Guide to the Davenport Family papers
1848-1966

Print this Finding Aid | Email this Finding Aid


Results

Overview of the Collection

Creator: Davenport family
Title: Davenport Family papers
Dates: 1848-1966 ( inclusive )
Quantity: 6.0 linear feet (10 containers, 85 oversize items)
Location of Collection: Homer Davenport oversize cartoons located in map cases. They are stored loose.
Collection Number: Ax 242
Summary: Timothy Woodbridge (T.W.) Davenport (1826-1911) and his family left Ohio for Oregon in the early 1850s, settling in the upper Willamette Valley. T.W. Davenport was a farmer, surveyor, state representative, state senator, and special Indian agent at the Umatilla Agency in the 1860s. T.W. Davenport’s son, Homer Davenport (1867-1912) became the most highly paid political cartoonist of his time. He also traveled to the Ottoman Empire, returning with the first purebred Arabian horses in America. The Davenport Family Papers contain the personal papers of T.W. Davenport, Homer Davenport, and the Davenport family. The collection includes correspondence, essays, drawings, photographs, and newspaper clippings. Of note are the handwritten and typewritten memoirs of T.W. Davenport and original political cartoons by Homer Davenport.
Repository: Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries

1299 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon, 97403-1299
(541) 346-3068
spcarref@uoregon.edu

Languages: Collection materials are in English. 
Sponsor: Funding for encoding this finding aid was provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Historical Note

Together with his father, Dr. Benjamin Davenport, Timothy Woodbridge (T.W.) Davenport set forth across the American continent in the spring of 1850. Because of misguided leadership of one of the members of their team, the Davenports decided to take an overland route from Ohio instead of opting for the quicker, water route along the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to Missouri. By the time they reached Missouri, the team was months behind the rest of the pioneers on the Oregon Trail and their oxen were already showing signs of wear. This late start may have been a blessing in disguise. As the Davenports proceeded across the Great Plains they heard of the massive cholera epidemic plaguing travelers that went before them. Before they reached the rigorous Rockies, the Davenports wisely decided to return to Newark, Missouri where they would wait out the winter. In Missouri Benjamin set up a medical practice for the winter and was able to purchase a new team of oxen for the trip. In the spring of 1851 the Davenport family once again set out across the plains, this time reaching Oregon Territory in the fall of that year and settling upon a 320-acre donation claim in the Waldo Hills of the upper Willamette Valley.

The first member of the Davenport family had arrived in America from England prior to 1640, originally settling in Dorchester, Massachusetts. The family remained in the Northeast for several generations. Benjamin Davenport, father of Timothy Woodbridge, was born in Columbia County, New York in 1799, the thirteenth child of Jonathan Davenport. Jonathan Davenport died when Benjamin was young. One of the few memories that Benjamin had of his father was of Jonathan lacing up his boots and exclaiming in pain. Jonathan removed his boots and socks to find a red pimple on his foot. Jonathan popped the pimple and died soon thereafter because of an infection in his foot. While the veracity of this story is hard to determine, it may have been a spark for young Benjamin to embark upon a medical career.

Benjamin Davenport left the Northeast for a while as young man, traveling to the South. Benjamin spent five years in the South, primarily in Kentucky and Louisiana. Despite a lack of formal education, Benjamin began practicing medicine. Relying on his quick wits and sound judgment, Davenport studied in his spare time and earned a reputation as a fair physician. While in the South, Benjamin objected to slavery, and he passed this sentiment onto T.W. When he returned to the North he would become an anti-slavery Whig and his home would eventually become a stop on the Underground Railroad. Upon his immediate return he resumed his medical studies with more rigor, eventually graduating from Pittsfield Medical College in Pittsfield, Massachusetts in 1826.

In 1825 Benjamin Davenport married Sarah R. Gott. Sarah had been born in 1803 to Story Gott, a wealthy landowner from Columbia County, New York. Story Gott was a popular man, known for his generosity and Epicurean tastes, as well as his distinguished service for the patriot cause during the American Revolution.

Timothy Woodbridge Davenport was born to Benjamin and Sarah on July 30, 1826 on a farm in Columbia County, New York. He was baptized in the Presbyterian faith and named after a blind minister, Timothy Woodbridge. The twenty-six letters of this name seemed too cumbersome for such a young boy so he earned the nickname T.W. His early years were spent at his maternal grandfather’s farm while his father continued with his medical education in New York.

Benjamin remained in New York, practicing medicine, until 1830. In the spring of that year his second son, Joseph, was born. That summer, in the first of series of moves westward, Benjamin moved his family and practice to Pennsylvania. He remained in Pennsylvania for five years before moving to Ohio where he jumped from town to town, finally taking up residence in Homer, Ohio.

While in Ohio, Dr. Davenport worked as an abolitionist helping slaves escape northward as part of the Underground Railroad. This period represented one of growth for T.W. as well. T.W. received the benefits of education, both in public schools and with private tutors. His studies ranged from classic Greek to Algebra and Geometry, which were beyond the normal curriculum for the time. The emphasis placed on education at an early age is clear from T.W.’s eloquent writing style. In 1845 T.W. went to Illinois as a schoolteacher and remained for two school years.

After two years as a schoolteacher in Illinois, T.W. decided to follow his father’s example and study medicine. T.W., however, was not as interested in the medical profession as his father and after one year at Sterling Medical College he returned to teaching in Woodstock, Ohio, though without much interest. When his father proposed a move across the country, T.W. jumped at the chance, planning to become a surveyor in Oregon.

The first years in Oregon were busy ones for the Davenport family. T.W. engaged in surveying and farming, but as his son Homer noted he was always a “politically minded farmer.” T.W. married his second cousin, Flora Geer, a gifted artist, and daughter of a prominent local family in 1854. In 1855 father and son, spurred by their abolitionist beliefs, helped organize the fledgling Republican Party in Oregon. This involvement led to the beginning of a political path for T.W. who would be elected to the first Republican state nominating conventions in 1858 and 1859.

While things seemed to be on an upswing for T.W. in these early years, tragedy struck in February 1857 with the death of Dr. Benjamin Davenport at the age of fifty-seven.

The outbreak of the Civil War in 1861 thrust the country into turmoil, though Oregon was able to stay out of the path of destruction. T.W.’s youngest brother Benjamin Franklin Davenport joined the Union cause, serving three years in Company C of the 1st Oregon Infantry. Being too old for military service, T.W. was asked by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, William H. Rector, to serve as Indian Agent of the Umatilla Agency in September 1862.

T.W. entered a system fraught with corruption and broken promises. Many people gave lip service to the “civilizing” mission of the reservation system, but few people believed it was possible to “reform” the Native American population. T.W. was an exception. He honestly believed that he could make a difference, so he set out in October 1862 to the Umatilla Reservation in northeastern Oregon brimming with confidence.

The first action taken by T.W. upon arriving at the reservation was to appoint a man named Mr. Pinto to the position of schoolteacher. By doing so, T.W. amended a promise broken by his predecessor. This action upset the reservation doctor who wanted his wife, despite her lack of qualifications, to fill the vacancy. The reservation doctor resigned in protest, but told the reservation Indians that he had been fired, which angered the Indians. While T.W. managed to placate the outraged tribal leaders this incident illustrates how T.W.’s good intentions were met with resistance from the beginning of his term. T.W. was constantly challenged by Indians who, understandably, refused to move onto the reservation and by Army officers who expressed hatred for Indians. While he would write a fond reminiscence about his experience for the Oregon Historical Quarterly forty years later, T.W.’s term was not as successful as he hoped and he returned to the Willamette Valley in 1863 after less than a year of service.

The next few years would be ones of growing political success for T.W. He was elected Marion County surveyor in 1864 and reelected in 1866. In 1868 he was elected to the state legislature and reelected in 1870. He was nominated again in 1872, but declined the position. As always, these years of success were mixed in their blessings. While his political success grew, personal tragedy struck.

In November, 1870 T.W.’s wife Flora was struck with smallpox and died. The couple had produced four children. Their daughter Olive had died at age four and their son John did not live past infancy. After his wife’s death, T.W. became the single father of daughter Orla and his three-year-old son, Homer. That winter was a hard one for the Davenport family as T.W. grieved for his wife and, with the aid of his mother, cared for two children who were recovering from smallpox as well. The intense rains added to the isolation, darkening the already gloomy mood. Young Homer, trapped by rain and illness, spent his time drawing with intense vigor.

T.W. married Nancy Elizabeth Gilmour (Lizzie) in October 1872. Clyde was born in 1873, Adelaide (Adda) in 1875, Alice in 1878, Georgia in 1880, and May Delle in 1885. T.W.’s political career took some time to get back on track. He ran for Congress in 1874 on the Independent ticket, but his bid was unsuccessful. In 1882 he was elected to a term in the state senate and in 1895 Governor William P. Lord appointed him to a four-year term as the state land commissioner. Throughout this time T.W. continued to write political and historical essays on subjects ranging from the origin of abolitionist sentiment in Oregon to the support of William Jennings Bryan and the Populist cause.

Homer Davenport seemed to be a perfect blend of his parents. He had his father’s political sensibilities and his mother’s artistic talent. These traits combined to form a political cartoonist with a touch of genius. In fact, his mother actively tried to bear a genius. Following the advice of a eugenicist, Flora abstained from meat and salt during pregnancy and attempted to get exercise and fresh air. The key element in this design lay with the conception. The child must be conceived during daylight hours, preferably outdoors.

Homer’s artistic genius came not from art schools or scholarly study, but rather from a combination of an active imagination and a keen eye for detail. T.W. lovingly recalled the hours Homer would spend watching the interactions of barnyard animals and then recreating their actions. As he grew he would examine art books and nearby galleries, but he would not imitate the work he saw, preferring to use his imagination as a muse.

As a young man Homer grew restless. He worked at the family store for a while without much interest. Homer left home as a young man drifting from job to job, working as a railroad fireman, a jockey, and even a circus clown. His drifting led him to Portland where he landed a position as an artist for the Portland Mercury.

While in the employ of the Mercury, Homer was sent to New Orleans to make some drawings of the Dempsey-Fitzsimmons boxing match. While on the train he drew some pictures of an African-American minister preaching on a train in Texas. He sent these sketches to his father, who was so impressed with them that he sent them on to cousins in Chicago. As legend has it, these relatives opened the drawings while entertaining the head of the art department for the San Francisco Examiner. Homer was quickly offered a position at the larger newspaper, and he quickly accepted, beginning work in 1892.

The circulation of the Examiner spread Homer’s cartoons to a larger audience. Homer soon gained a reputation for bold cartoons that were not afraid to tackle any issue, including the political machine that ran the city. These cartoons soon caught the attention of William Randolph Hearst. When Hearst purchased the New York Journal in 1895, he wooed Homer away from San Francisco and into the national spotlight.

At the New York Journal Homer increased his attacks on corruption in politics, targeting the big trusts and the McKinley campaign for being beholden to big business. One figure that Homer attacked with particular vehemence was McKinley’s campaign manager “Dollar” Mark Hanna. Davenport portrayed Hanna as grossly oversized, wearing a suit covered in dollar signs and smoking a large cigar. These cartoons enraged his critics so much that they attempted to pass an anti-cartoon bill through the New York legislature in 1897. Fortunately for Davenport public opinion was on his side and the bill was defeated.

Homer Davenport’s political cartoons opened doors for him around the world. He visited the British Parliament, becoming one of the first American cartoonists to watch the assembly. With the aid of friend Theodore Roosevelt, Homer traveled to the Ottoman Empire, returning with the first purebred Arabian horses in America. These horses became his passion. Despite being the highest paid cartoonist in the nation, he preferred to remain on his New Jersey farm with his children and his beloved horses.

Homer’s life was cut short in 1912 when he died of pneumonia after covering the sinking of the Titanic. Hearst, to honor his beloved cartoonist, had his body sent back to Silverton to lay next to his father. T.W. died only a year before Homer, in 1911.

Content Description

The Davenport Family Papers are divided into five series according to family member and then collection type. The first two series are dedicated to the most famous of the Davenports, Timothy Woodbridge and Homer Calvin Davenport, who were both influential in late nineteenth century state and federal politics. The collection contains family reminiscences, correspondence, photographs, newspaper articles and cartoons by Homer Davenport.The Davenport Family Papers are divided into five series according to family member and then collection type. The first two series are dedicated to the most famous of the Davenports, Timothy Woodbridge and Homer Calvin Davenport, who were both influential in late nineteenth century state and federal politics. The collection contains family reminiscences, correspondence, photographs, newspaper articles and cartoons by Homer Davenport.

Series I, Timothy Woodbridge Davenport Papers contain the personal papers of the prominent politician and are divided into several subseries. Subseries A contains a wide correspondence from the 1860s till his death in 1911 with family members and political acquaintances, which reflects T.W. Davenport’s dedication to his family and his Republican sentiment. Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by recipient and/or by writer, and then chronologically. Subseries B contains legal documents; including land deeds and a Umatilla Agency receipt roll for the Walla Walla tribe from 1862. Subseries C, Personal Writings and Essays, contains poetry, political essays, and letters to the editor. Subseries D, Memoirs, includes handwritten and typewritten memoirs by Timothy Woodbridge Davenport.

Series II, Homer Calvin Davenport Papers, contain documents that reflect his career as a political cartoonist and his love for Arabian horses and exotic birds. Subseries A, Correspondence, contains several letters to his sister, Adelaide, and his father, T.W. There are also several telegrams regarding the death of T.W., including one from former President Theodore Roosevelt. Subseries B, Newspaper Clippings, contains newspaper articles and published cartoons both by Homer Davenport and about him. Many of the newspaper clippings are glued on both sides of a page. Subseries D, Memoirs and Character Sketches, includes writings about Homer Davenport by authors Timothy Woodbridge Davenport and Jean Morris Ellis.

Series III, Miscellaneous Davenport Family Papers, is broken down into three subseries by other individual family members, for whom a substantial amount of papers are included in this collection. Subseries A, Adelaide Davenport Correspondence, includes several letters to the Davenport family biographer, Robert Down, among others. Subseries B, Lizzie (Nancy Elizabeth) Davenport Correspondence, includes several letters from her daughters and telegrams regarding the death of Homer Davenport, because Lizzie was his stepmother. Subseries C, Timothy Clyde Davenport Correspondence, is largely outgoing letters to his parents, T.W. and Lizzie, and reflects his years at a sanatorium . The final Subseries D, Miscellaneous Davenport, largely includes correspondence to and from family members and memorabilia such as the Frederic Remington monument brochure, poems from “Captain Jack” John W. Crawford, and a lock of hair from a funeral director in Los Angeles.

Series IV, Photographs, is broken in to two subseries by size. Both Subseries A and B include images of the Davenport family members, various acquaintances, and Arabian stallions and pheasants. These are arranged alphabetically first by family members, and then other individuals.

Series V, Oversize, contains more photographs in Subseries A, legal documents and awards in Subseries B, and newspaper clippings in Subseries C. Subseries D contains scrapbooks including books of Timothy Woodbridge and Homer Davenport’s deaths and newspaper clippings. Subseries E contains Homer Davenport miscellany including signed poetry by “Captain Jack” John W. Crawford, Homer Davenport’s book, The Dollar or the Man, and advertisements for his autobiography, The Country Boy. These are all arranged the same way as described above. Subseries F, Original Cartoons by Homer Davenport, contains approximately 100 drawings and are arranged by title.

Use of the Collection

Restrictions on Access :  

Collection is open to the public.

Collection must be used in Special Collections & University Archives Reading Room.

Restrictions on Use :  

Property rights reside with Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries. Copyright resides with the creators of the documents or their heirs. All requests for permission to publish collection materials must be submitted to Special Collections & University Archives. The reader must also obtain permission of the copyright holder.

Archival may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal and/or state right to privacy laws and other regulations.

Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g. a cause of action for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of Oregon assumes no responsibility.

If a researcher finds sensitive personal information in a collection, please bring it to the attention of the reading room staff.

Preferred Citation :  

[Identification of item], Davenport family Papers, Ax 242, Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Administrative Information

Arrangement :

Collection is organized into the following series:

  • Series I: Timothy Woodbridge Davenport Papers
  • Series II: Homer Calvin Davenport Papers
  • Series III: Miscellaneous Davenport Family Papers
  • Series IV: Photographs
  • Series V: Oversize

Acquisition Information :  

The collection was a gift of Alice Davenport Bernard in 1965.

Processing Note :  

Collection processed by staff.

This finding aid may be updated periodically to account for new acquisitions to the collection and/or revisions in arrangement and description.

Related Materials :  

Other resources in Special Collections & University Archives about the Davenports are the following: Recollections of an Indian Agent, by T.W. Davenport; The Annotated Quest : Homer Davenport & His Wonderful Arabian Horses, by Homer Davenport, with annotations by Charles and Jeanne Craver; Cartoons, by Homer C. Davenport, with an introduction by Hon. John J. Ingalls; Annual Homer Davenport Memorial Arabian Horse Show Souvenir Catalog; and Homer, the Country Boy, by Mickey Hickman. These resources are included in the Rare Books Collection and the Oregon Collection in Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries.


Detailed Description of the Collection

Series I:  Timothy Davenport papers
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries A1: Outgoing correspondence
Box
Folder
1 1 Letter to Mary Burns re: death of her father April 18, 1911
1 2 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport October 14, 1892
1 3 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport February 9, 1893
1 4 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport May 29, 1893
1 5 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport June 1, 1893
1 6 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport October 14, 1892
1 7 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport October 14, 1892
1 8 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport October 27, 1898
1 9 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport October 28, 1898
1 10 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport November 2, 1898
1 11 Two letters to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport December 28, 1898
1 12 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport April 22, 1899
1 13 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport January 30, 1901
1 14 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport December 11, 1901
1 15 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport October 23, 1902
1 16 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport February 10, 1905
1 17 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport August 14, 1907
1 18 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport August 26, 1910
1 19 Letter to Adelaide "Adda" Davenport August 28, 1910
1 20 Letter to "Adda" and Jean Davenport October 16, 1908
1 21 Letter to "Adda" and Mary Davenport December 22, 1908
1 22 Letter to "Adda" and Mary Davenport January 7, 1909
1 23 Letter to "Adda" and Mary Davenport March 12, 1909
1 24 Letter to "Adda" and Mary Davenport March 20, 1908
1 25 Letter to "Adda" and Mary Davenport April 12, 1909
1 26 Letter to "Adda" and Mary Davenport July 16, 1909
1 27 Letter to "Big Baby" (possibly Adda or Mary) October 30 1908
1 28 Letter to Alice Davenport October 4, 1898
1 29 Letter to Alice Davenport September 21, 1898
1 30 Letter to Alice Davenport January 25, 1899
1 31 Letter to Alice Davenport February 10, 1899
1 32 Letter to Alice Davenport August 5, 1899
1 33 Letter to Alice Davenport October 17, 1910
1 34 Letter to Alice Davenport September 25 (no year, incomplete)
1 35 Letter to Homer C. Davenport April 28, 1901
1 36 Letter to Homer C. Davenport March 28, 1902
1 37 Letter to Homer C. Davenport December 15, 1902
1 38 Letter to Homer C. Davenport October 24, 1904
1 39 Letter to Homer C. Davenport December 20, 1904
1 40 Letter to Homer C. Davenport December 20, 1910
1 41 Letter to Homer C. Davenport February 12, 1911
1 42 Letter to Mary Davenport May 3, 1910
1 43 Letter to Mary Davenport May 9, 1910
1 44 Letter to W. Dawning November 28, 1902
1 45 Letter to "My Dear Children" July 13, 1900
1 46 Letter to "My Dear Ones All" September 9, 1910
1 47 Letter to Nancy Davenport July 20, 1872
1 48 Letter to Nancy Davenport August 20, 1872
1 49 Letter to Nancy Davenport September 6, 1872
1 50 Letter to Nancy Davenport September 10, 1872
1 51 Letter to Nancy Davenport June 28, 1874
1 52 Letter to Nancy Davenport May 31, 1878
1 53 Letter to Nancy Davenport June 30, 1894
1 54 Letter to Nancy Davenport and Children October 20, 1897
1 55 Letter to "Dear Ones All" September 28, 1910
1 56 Letter to "Dear Ones All" October 4, 1910
1 57 Letter to Editor of Examiner February 20, 1911
1 58 Letter to Editor of Los Angeles Examiner April 14, 1911
1 59 Letter to "Flora" May 3, 1863
1 60 Letter to "Flora" July 31, 1863
1 61 Letter to "Flora" August 18, 1863
1 62 Letter to "Flora" September 10, 1863
1 63 Letter to "Flora" February 24, 1864
1 64 Letter to Georgia August 19, 1910
1 65 Letter to Kate Morrison April 10, 1870
1 66 Letter to Kate Morrison March 25, 1891
1 67 Letter to Kate Morrison May 29, 1891
1 68 Letter to Kate Morrison February 22, 1893
1 69 Letter to Kate Morrison, missing page one undated
1 70 Letter to Kate Morrison April 27, 1893
1 71 Letter to Kate Morrison July 7, 1893
1 72 Letter to Kate Morrison October 10, 1893
1 73 Letter to Kate Morrison June 1, 1898
1 74 Letter to Kate Morrison August 28, 1898
1 75 Letter to Kate Morrison January 1, 1900
1 76 Letter to Kate Morrison February 21, 1901
1 77 Letter to Kate Morrison April 22, 1901
1 78 Letter to Kate Morrison August 2, 1904
1 79 Letter to Kate Morrison March 29, 1905
1 80 Letter to Kate Morrison March 4, 1907
1 81 Letter to Kate Morrison January 3, 1910
1 82 Letter to Kate Morrison undated
1 83 Letter to "My Dear" September 7, 1872
1 84 Letter to "My Dear Wife" May 20, 1910
1 85 Letter to "My Own Dear Wife" June 21, 1874
1 86 Letter to "Nannie and all the rest" August 5, 1910
1 87 Letter to Louis F. Post November 8, 1900
1 88 Letter to Mrs. Caroline Severance January 29, 1911
1 89 Letter to Mrs. Mareline Smith February 20, 1911
1 90 Letter to Senator Smith February 2, 1899
1 91 Letter to Clara H. Waldo February 4, 1894
1 92 Letter to Prof. F.G. Young September 30, 1907
1 93 Letter to Unknown September 8, 1897
1 94 Letter to Unknown September 6, 1907
1 95 Letter to Unknown August 7, 1910
1 96 Letter to Unknown: No date and missing first page October 16, 1908
1 97 Letter to Unknown: No date and missing first page October 16, 1908
Subseries A2: Incoming correspondence
Box
Folder
2 1 Letter from Benjamin Davenport July 25, 1848
2 2 Letter from C.W. Fairbanks December 17, 1907
2 3 Letter from Ben B. Lindsey October 4, 1910
2 4 Letter from Henry E. McGinn undated
2 5 Letter from J.B. Pond December 6, 1902
2 6 Letter from J.B. Pond December 30, 1902
2 7 Letter from Louis F. Post November 22, 1900
2 8 Letter from Lloyd Samson December 7, 1906
2 9 Letter from Hazard Stevens January 8, 1904
2 10 Letter B. Washington January 23, 1909
2 11 Letter from unknown January 23, 1909
2 12 Letter from unknown January 4, 1903
Subseries B: Legal Documents
Box
Folder
3 1 Umatilla Agency, Receipt Roll, Walla Walla "C" property return, 4th Qr. 1862, Umatilla Indian Reservation 1862
3 2 Warranty Deed of Marion county property September 4, 1882
3 3 Warranty Deed of Marion County property October 5, 1885
3 4 Warranty Deed of Clackamas county property: Lots 22 and 23 of block 73 June 16, 1891
3 5 Oregon Land Company Deed: Lot 22 of block 23 March 4, 1892
3 6 Power of Attorney to Sell Real Estate February 20, 1941
Subseries C: Personal Writings and Essays
Box
Folder
3 7 "An Object Lesson in Paternalism"
3 8 Poem, "One Little Voice is Hushed Forever"
3 9 Notes from a poem, "How Shall I Know Thee in the Spirit Sphere"
3 10 Untitled paper (missing page one)
3 11 His Guide, Philosopher and Friend
3 12 Petition to the Legislative Assembly of the State of Oregon
3 13 To the State Board of Land Commissioners January 27, 1898
3 14 "Political Principles"
3 15 "The Haunted House of Humboldt County"
3 16 To the Editor of the Tribune April 26, 1903
3 17 To the Editor [about Senator John H. Mitchell]
3 18 To the Editor of the Statesman [about Land Office Tenure]
3 19 "Elihu Root vs. Direct Legislation and the Election of U.S. Senators by the People"
3 20 An Open Letter to the Legislative Assembly of Oregon
3 21 "A Birth Day Present to Homer 38 Years Old"
3 22 "Reminiscences" [possibly about T.W. Davenport's father, Benjamin]
Subseries D: Memoirs and Character Sketches
Box
Folder
3 23 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 1)
3 24 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 2)
3 25 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 3)
3 26 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 4)
3 27 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 5)
3 28 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 6) January 27, 1898
3 29 Handwritten memoir of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport (Part 7)
3 30 Memoirs of Timothy W. Davenport (transcribed)
3 31 Typewritten character sketch of Timothy Woodbridge Davenport

^ Return to Top

Series II:  Homer Calvin Davenport papers
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries A1: Outgoing correspondence
Box
Folder
4 1 Letter to "Adda" Davenport January 9, 1891
4 2 Letter to "Adda" Davenport January 15, 1891
4 3 Letter to "Adda" Davenport June 13, 1892
4 4 Letter to "Adda" Davenport August 8, 1892
4 5 Letter to "Adda" Davenport March 5, 1896
4 6 Letter to "Adda" Davenport September 1, 1906
4 7 Letter to Alice Davenport February 9, 1896
4 8 Letter to Alice Davenport October 17, 1911
4 9 Letter to Mrs. J.W. Davenport April 27, undated
4 10 Letter to Mary Davenport October 21, 1910
4 11 Letter to Mary Davenport Undated
4 12 Letter to T.W. Davenport December 24, 1896
4 13 Letter to T.W. Davenport August 1, 1897
4 14 Letter to T.W. Davenport March 24, 1902
4 15 Letter to T.W. Davenport May 13, 1902
4 16 Letter to T.W. Davenport February 3, 1903
4 17 Letter to T.W. Davenport April 22, 1903
4 18 Letter to T.W. Davenport September 10, 1903
4 19 Letter to T.W. Davenport January 8, 1905
4 20 Letter to T.W. Davenport January 1, 1906
4 21 Letter to T.W. Davenport August 19, 1906
4 22 Letter to T.W. Davenport October 13, 1906
4 23 Letter to T.W. Davenport December 14, 1906
4 24 Letter to T.W. Davenport May 3, 1907
4 25 Letter to T.W. Davenport June 1907
4 26 Letter to T.W. Davenport July 30, 1907
4 27 Letter to T.W. Davenport January 29, 1908
4 28 Letter to T.W. Davenport December 12, 1910
4 29 Letter to T.W. Davenport Undated
4 30 Letter to Mother February 6, 1912
4 31 Letter to Mother and sisters June 28, 1911
Subseries A2: Incoming correspondence
Box
Folder
4 32 Telegram from James R. Garfield April 29, 1911 May 1, 1911
4 33 Telegrams from Theodore Roosevelt May 11, 1911 May 2, 1911
4 34 Letter [proof] from Homer Clyde Davenport Undated
4 35 Letter from Department of State January 4, 1906
4 36 Letter from Charles W. Fairbanks May 2, 1911
4 37 Letter from Charles Dana Gibson Undated
4 38 Letter from Ahmut Hafez December 24, 1906
4 39 Telegrams from John E. Hedges and Henry George, Jr. April 30, 1911
4 40 Letter from Frederic Remington Undated
4 41 Letter from C. W. Smith May 10, 1911
4 42 Telegrams from Katherine Tingley, re: T.W. Davenport's death May 1, 1911 May 4, 1911 May 4, 1911
4 43 Letter from unknown [illegible] Undated
Subseries B: Newspaper clippings
Box
Folder
5 1 "The Real American Woman," by Homer Davenport March 27, 1911
5 2 "Life Sacrificed to Gold and Cupidity," by Homer Davenport March 28, 1911
5 3 "On the Reno Trail," by Homer Davenport April 3, 1911
5 4 "King and Athlete," by Homer Davenport 1911
5 5 "The Day of the Child," by Homer Davenport 1911
5 6 "Don't Run Across the Street in this Age," by Homer Davenport 1911
5 7 "Davenport Says Good-Bye" May 7, 1912
5 8 "Homer Davenport Dies in New York" May 12, 1912
5 9 "Homer Davenport Monument" May 22, 1912
5 10 "Homer Davenport Statue Contributions Asked Here," by Otheman Stevens July 30, 1923
5 11 "Arab Horses at Pomona" July 12, 1925
5 12 "He's Good Enough for Me," by Homer Davenport November 6, 1932
5 13 "The Johnsonian Sphinx as Davenport Sees It," by Homer Davenport
5 14 Roosevelt drawing by Homer Davenport
5 15 "Davenport is Recalled," The Sunday Oregonian
5 16 "Mr. Harriman as a Witness," by Homer Davenport
5 17 "Roving Sea Gull Brings Romance to Chicken Yard," by Winifred Black
5 18 Memorial to Homer Davenport in Oregon Daily Journal
5 19 "Up to Oregon People," by Adda Davenport-Martin
5 20 "Why Our School Fund is Small"
5 21 "Homer Davenport's Biographers"
5 22 ""Once Overs," by O.O. McIntyre
5 23 "Overpopulation," by Guglielmo Ferrero
5 24 "Davenport on Mr. Dooley," by Homer Davenport
5 25 "Still Waiting," by Homer Davenport
5 26 Article re: death of Homer Davenport, incomplete November 6, 1932
5 27 Unknown article
Subseries C: Memoirs and Character Sketches
Box
Folder
5 28 Homer Davenport Memoir (84 page typed)
5 29 "Homer Davenport, A Character Sketch," by Jean Morris Ellis
5 30 Birth Day Present, by T.W. Davenport 1905
5 31 The Story of Homer Davenport, Unknown author
5 32 Chapter V, Unknown author
5 33 "If Homer Had Done So," Unknown author
5 34 Sketch of Homer Davenport, by Timothy Woodbridge Davenport
5 35 Sketch of Homer Davenport, Unknown author
5 36 Homer Davenport's Tradition by Adda Davenport
5 37 Sketch of Homer Davenport by Adda Davenport
Subseries C: Memoirs and Character Sketches
Box
Folder
5 28 Homer Davenport Memoir (84 page typed, legal size)
5 29 Homer Davenport, A Character Sketch, by Jean Morris Ellis
5 30 Birth Day Present, by T.W. Davenport 1905
5 31 The Story of Homer Davenport, Unknown author
5 32 Chapter V, Author unknown
5 33 "If Homer had done so," Unknown author
5 34 Sketch of Homer Davenport by Timothy Woodbridge Davenport
5 35 Sketch of Homer Davenport by Unknown Author
5 36 Homer Davenport's Tradition by Adda Davenport
5 37 Sketch of Homer Davenport by Adda Davenport

^ Return to Top

Series III:  Miscellaneous Davenport Family papers
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries A: Adelaide Davenport correspondence
Box
Folder
6 1 Letter to Robert Down September 12, 1929
6 2 Letter to Robert Down September 23, 1929
6 3 Letter to Robert Down October 22, 1929
6 4 Letter to Robert Down January 31, 1931
6 5 Letter to Robert Down August 26, 1930
6 6 Letter to Robert Down January 4, 1931
6 7 Questionnaire to Robert Down
6 8 Letter to John Raudolf Haynes November 23, 1915
6 9 Letter to H.O. Hunter November 16, 1929
6 10 Letter to Judge Henry E. McGinn June 3, 1934
6 11 Letter to Nattie November 17, 1927
6 12 Letter from Ada undated
6 13 Letter from Winifred B. Bonfils October 24, 1929
6 14 Letter from Florence B. Cartwright undated
6 15 Letter from J.W. Crawford October 31, 1910
6 16 Letter from David and Mary October 16, 1918
6 17 Letter from Robert Down September 24, 1929
6 18 Letter from George H. Himes January 14, 1924
6 19 Letter from Carroll Warder January 22, 1919
Subseries B: Lizzie (Nancy Elizabeth) Davenport correspondence
Box
Folder
6 20 Letter to Adelaide Davenport May 29, 1893
6 21 Letter to Adda D. Martin October 13, 1898
6 22 Letter to Adelaide Davenport June 20, 1918
6 23 Letter to Adelaide Davenport October 19, 1918
6 24 Letter to Alice May 26, 1918
6 25 Letter to Alice July 10, 1918
6 26 Letter to Alice August 30, 1918
6 27 Telegram from Reakirt May 2, 1912
6 28 Telegram from Zada, re: Homer Davenport ill with pneumonia April 30, 1912
6 29 Letter from Pasadena Correspondent, re: Homer Davenport’s burial May 6, 1912
6 30 Postcard from unknown
Subseries C: Timothy Clyde Davenport correspondence
Box
Folder
6 31 Letter to T.W. Davenport July 16, 1890
6 32 Letter to T.W. Davenport October 12, 1890
6 33 Letter to Lizzie Davenport September 25, no year
6 34 Letter to Mother November 17, 1890
6 35 Letter to Mother January 26, no year
6 36 Letter to Parents undated
6 37 Letter to Papa and Mamma November 18, 1890
6 38 Letter to Papa and Mamma November 21, 1890
6 39 Letter to Sister Adda undated
6 40 Letter to unknown [Series III, Subseries C, Box 6, Folder 40] undated
Subseries D: Miscellaneous Davenport
Box
Folder
6 41 Letter to "Cousin" from unknown [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 41] July 28, 1862
6 42 Letter to H.A. Longhary, from Julia Chandler [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 42] March 23, 1871
6 43 Letter from Maria Bradley [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 43] December 5, 1890
6 44 Letter to Adda from Timothy Woodbridge Davenport [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 44] September 27, 1898 September 28, 1898
6 45 Picture drawn by Adelaide Davenport of "Si-eed" [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 45] 1908
6 46 Letter to Will, from Walt [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 46] October 1, 1915
6 47 Letter to Mr. and Mrs. Armstrong, from Ella H. Durley [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 47] January 20, 1919
6 48 Letter to Sissos, from Melmo [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 48] October 23, 1927
6 Questionnaire for John C. Davenport from Secretary of Oregon Pioneer Association [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 49]
6 50 Manuscript, unknown author [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 50]
6 51 Postcard to Sarah Davenport, from Cleo and Clara Foster [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 51]
6 52 "A Personal Glimpse of Myself:" By Adelaide Davenport Armstrong [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 52]
6 53 Homer Davenport Memorial Fund letter and card [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 53]
6 54 Memoir by Hazard Stevens [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 54]
6 55 The Frederic Remington Monument Fund brochure [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 55]
6 56 Poem, "I am bigger and stronger to-day by far," by John W. "Capt. Jack" Crawford [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 56]
6 57 Lock of hair and lace in a W.A. Brown, Funeral Director, Los Angeles envelope [Series III, Subseries D, Box 6, Folder 57]

^ Return to Top

Photographs (PH111)
6.0 linear feet
Davenport family
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
1 Small prints
2 Medium prints
4 Large prints
4 Oversize prints
1 PH111_001: Adelaide Davenport [portrait]
1.0 photographic print
3 inch circle inches
undated
PH111_002: Adelaide Davenport [in tartan gown, seated by prop piano]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6 inches
Jones, W.L. of Silverton
undated
PH111_003: Adelaide Davenport [portrait, profile with glass]
1.0 photographic print
4 x 5.5 inches
undated
PH111_004: Adelaide Davenport [portrait]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6 inches
Benjamin, O.C. of Orange, NJ
undated
PH111_005: Adelaide and Mary Davenport [portrait]
1.0 photographic print
3 x 5 inches
Cronise
undated
PH111_006: Adelaide Davenport, Alice and Cleo Davenport, Mattie Gilmour [four children, tinted tintype]
1.0 photographic print
3 x 4 inches
undated
PH111_007: Adelaide Davenport, Jimmy Swinnutter, John the Hosteler and monkey [snapshot in stable door]
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 4.5 inches
undated
Folder
7 8 PH111_008: Gloria Davenport, “To her Grand Pa”
1.0 photographic print
7 x 9.25 inches
March 8, 1905
7 9 PH111_009: Gloria Davenport and Mildred, “To Sisters, My Beauties,” New York
1.0 photographic print
9 x 12 inches
Pack of New York
1910
1 PH111_010: Grandpa Davenport and Aunt Alice
1.0 photographic print
2 x 2.75 inches
Field, J.H. of Berlin, WI
undated
1 PH111_011: Homer Calvin Davenport [Portrait in top hat]
1.0 photographic print
3 x 4.25 inches
Eastman of Portland
undated
7 12 PH111_012: Homer Calvin Davenport [portrait with foulard]
1.0 photographic print
8.25 x 10.75 inches
Bushnell
undated
7 13 PH111_013: Homer Calvin Davenport [portrait in soft hat, 2 copies]
1.0 photographic print
8 x 13 inches
Harris & Ewing of Washington, D.C.
1909
7 13 PH111_014: Homer Calvin Davenport [portrait in soft hat, 2 copies]
1.0 photographic print
8 x 10..25 inches
Harris & Ewing of Washington, D.C.
1909
7 14 PH111_015: Homer Calvin Davenport
1.0 photographic print
7.25 x 9.25 inches
Bell, Curtis
undated
7 15 PH111_016: Homer Calvin Davenport, “Pure desert bred Arab Nedjrau”
1.0 photographic print
8 x 10..25 inches
undated
7 16 PH111_017: Homer Calvin Davenport on Morgan horse
1.0 photographic print
7 x 9.25 inches
ca. 1896
7 17 PH111_018: Homer Calvin Davenport on Morgan horse
1.0 photographic print
7 x 9.25 inches
ca. 1908
7 18 PH111_019: Homer Calvin Davenport and unknown child [snapshot]
1.0 photographic print
5.25 x 6.5 inches
undated
7 19 PH111_020: Homer Calvin Davenport and Jimmy Swimmerton [portrait, standing]
1.0 photographic print
6.25 x 8.75 inches
undated
7 20 PH111_021: Homer Calvin Davenport and Silverton Trombone Band [all identified]
1.0 photographic print
6 x 10 inches
undated
7 21 PH111_022: Homer Calvin Davenport and Baseball team [studio portrait with gear, all identified]
1.0 photographic print
8 x 10.5 inches
undated
7 22 PH111_023: Said beating “The Weird Coffee Tune” [Arab man grinding coffee beans, surrounded by Davenport's friends]
1.0 photographic print
7 x 7.25 inches
undated
7 23 PH111_024: [Homer Calvin Davenport in group of men, identified, possilby pioneers]
1.0 photographic print
8 x 10 inches
undated
7 24 PH111_025: Homer Calvin Davenport’s Funeral, by J.D. Drake (2 photographs, one on front and one on back)
1.0 photographic print
7 x 11 inches
Drake, John D.
1912
7 25 PH111_026: Homer Calvin Davenport’s Funeral, by J.D. Drake (2 photographs, one on front and one on back)
1.0 photographic print
7 x 11 inches
Drake, John D.
1912
7 26 PH111_027: Homer Calvin Davenport and Silverton Marine Band [all identified]
1.0 photographic print
7 x 10 inches
November 1884
1 PH111_028: Homer Clyde Davenport and his dog, Dick Swiveler [studio portait of child and bull terrioer]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
Brody of Orange, NJ
undated
7 28 PH111_029: Young Homer Clyde and Bull Dogs [snapshot in stable door]
1.0 photographic print
5 x 6.5 inches
undated
7 29 PH111_030: Homer Clyde, Age 3-1/2 years [portrait in sailor suit]
1.0 photographic print
5.25 x 7.5 inches
Benjamin, O.C. of Orange, NJ
undated
7 30 PH111_031: Homer Clyde, Age 2-1/2 [portrait in dress]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
Schill of Newark, NJ
undated
7 31 PH111_032: Homer Clyde, Age 22 mo. [portrait in sailor dress]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
Benjamin, O.C. of Orange, NJ
undated
7 32 PH111_033: Homer Jr., [portrait as boy, oval vignette]
1.0 photographic print
2.75 x 3.5 inches
undated
7 33 PH111_034: Homer Jr. [portrait as boy, in double-breasted jacket]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
undated
7 34 PH111_035: Young Homer Clyde Davenport, Homer’s son
1.0 photographic print
6 x 9 inches
Klindienst, W.H. of Morristown, NJ
undated
7 35 PH111_036: Homer Clyde Davenport and Mildred
1.0 photographic print
4" circle inches
Channell Studio of Orange, NJ
undated
7 36 PH111_037: Homer Clyde Davenport and Mildred, oval
1.0 photographic print
5.5 x 8 inches
[Illegible]
undated
7 37 PH111_038: Clyde D., Silverton [portrait of boy]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
undated
7 38 PH111_039: Clyde, 17 years
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6 inches
Jones, W.L. of Silverton
undated
7 39 PH111_040: Clyde Davenport [aged 17, copy of #38]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
Jones, W.L. of Silverton
undated
7 40 PH111_041: Mary Davenport [toddler, holding book]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
undated
7 41 PH111_042: Mary Davenport [standing]
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 8 inches
undated
7 42 PH111_043: Mary Davenport [headshot]
1.0 photographic print
7.25 x 9.25 inches
undated
7 43 PH111_044: Mary Davenport [profile]
1.0 photographic print
5.25 x 9.5 inches
undated
7 44 PH111_045: Mary Davenport, in hat
1.0 photographic print
7 x 9.25 inches
undated
7 45 PH111_046: Mary and Cleo Davenport, Ages 7 and 2
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
Jones, W.L. of Silverton
undated
7 46 PH111_047: Mary Davenport and graduating class of Silverton
1.0 photographic print
5 x 8 inches
undated
7 47 PH111_048: Mildred Davenport, 3 year taken on birthday
1.0 photographic print
4 x 5.5 inches
Alisky of San Francisco, CA
undated
7 48 PH111_049: Mildred Davenpor [clutching dress]
1.0 photographic print
5 x 7 inches
Channell Studio of Orange, NJ
undated
7 49 PH111_050: Mildred Davenport [bow in hair]
1.0 photographic print
6 x 9 inches
Klindienst, W.H. of Morristown, NJ
undated
7 50 PH111_051: Mildred Davenport Riding on Arab Mare [halftone]
1.0 sheet
5 x 5.75 inches
undated
7 51 PH111_052: Mildred Davenport and Gloria
1.0 photographic print
4.75 x 5.25 inches
Klindienst, W.H. of Morristown, NJ
undated
7 52 PH111_053: Orla Davenport, 16 years [2 copies]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
Paxton, A.B. of Albany
undated
7 53 PH111_054: Julie Bernard
1.0 photographic print
7.5 x 9 inches
Evans of Los Angeles, CA
March 22, 1921
7 54 PH111_055: Jean Morris Ellis
1.0 photographic print
4 x 6.75 inches
undated
7 55 PH111_056: Nancy Elizabeth Gilmour [2 copies]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
Paxton, A.B. of Albany
undated
7 56 PH111_057: Alice and Jessica Jacobs
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6 inches
Jones, W.L. of Silverton
undated
7 57 PH111_058: Aunt Lucinda
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6 inches
Plummer of Seattle, WA
undated
7 58 PH111_059: Jules Pages, Paris, August
1.0 photographic print
5 x 7 inches
1899 Aug
7 59 PH111_060: Edgar Seldon
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 5.5 inches
Apeda of New York
July 11, 1911
7 60 PH111_061: A.W. Smith
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6 inches
Foster, Campblee & co. of Richmond, VA
undated
7 61 PH111_062: Marshall P. Wilder
1.0 photographic print
7 x 9 inches
Marceau of New York
August 6, 1911
7 62 PH111_063: Lady Amherst Pheasant, one of many aviaries at home
1.0 photographic print
5 x 6.5 inches
undated
7 63 PH111_064: Ho-Ki pheasant, Wild Java peacock, Reeves pheasant and a Plaud goose, New Zealand
1.0 photographic print
5.25 x 6.25 inches
undated
7 64 PH111_065: Col. Bill Sterrett on Arab stallion Abeyan [see caption]
1.0 photographic print
7 x 9 inches
undated
7 65 PH111_066: Horses at an Arab encampment
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 6 inches
undated
7 66 PH111_067: Silverton [main street with tree at center]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
1865
7 67 PH111_068: Water Street from Main St. NE, Silverton, Oregon 1907
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 5.5 inches
Drake, John D.
1907
7 68 PH111_069: Negatives
1.0 negative
undated
7 69 PH111_070: Negatives of Davenport cartoons
1.0 negative
undated
7 70 PH111_071: Said Abdullah Arabian slave boy [Bas-relief sculpture by Adelaide Davenport]
1.0 photographic print
4 x 6.5 inches
undated
7 71 PH111_072: “Arabian” modeled by the author [Bas-relief sculpture of man in Arab robes, by Adelaide Davenport]
1.0 photographic print
7 x 10.5 inches
undated
7 72 PH111_073: Original Davenport cartoons for sale, with letter (2 photos)
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 3.5 inches
September 1966
8 1 PH111_074: Adelaide Davenport
1.0 photographic print
8 x 10 inches
undated
8 3 PH111_075: John C. Davenport
1.0 photographic print
9 x 13 inches
Gylfe, A. of Aberdeen
undated
8 4 PH111_076: John C. Davenport, profile
1.0 photographic print
4 x 5.25 inches
undated
8 5 PH111_077: Bust of T.W. Davenport by Adelaide Davenport
1.0 photographic print
4 x 5 inches
undated
8 6 PH111_078: Sarah Davenport, Age 68 (tintype)
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
June 24, 1871
8 7 PH111_079: Sarah Davenport, with book
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
undated
8 8 PH111_080: Timothy Davenport [as a young man]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
undated
8 9 PH111_081: Timothy Davenport [middle-aged]
1.0 photographic print
2.5 x 4.5 inches
Paxton, A.B. of Albany
undated
8 10 PH111_082: Timothy Davenport with Jean Morris Ellis
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 6.5 inches
undated
8 11 PH111_083: Timothy Davenport and Mrs. Davenport [Seated on bank of river, bridge in background]
1.0 photographic print
6 x 8 inches
undated
8 12 PH111_084: Timothy Davenport looking at a memorial
1.0 photographic print
4.5 x 6.5 inches
undated
8 13 PH111_085: Timothy Davenport bust by Adelaide
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 4.5 inches
undated
8 14 PH111_086: Cousin Walter Davenport of Colfax, Washington
1.0 photographic print
9 x 12 inches
Libby of Spokane, WA
undated
8 15 PH111_087: Harrison Fisher [inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
4.25 x 8 inches
Sarony of New York
1910
8 16 PH111_088: Good Morning, Robert Fitzsimmons [boxer, shaking hands in garden with T.W. Davenport]
1.0 photographic print
5.25 x 6.5 inches
undated
8 17 PH111_089: Robert Fitzsimmons [Portrait in evening clothes of noted boxes, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
7.5 x 11 inches
Bellsmith of Ohio & NY
undated
8 18 PH111_090: Thomas Lipton [aboard yacht "Erin," inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9 x 12.5 inches
October 7, 1903
8 19 PH111_091: Lillian Russell [profile portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
6.75 x 9.5 inches
Matzene Studio of Chicago, IL
undated
8 20 PH111_092: Lillian Russell [portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9.5 x 12.5 inches
Matzene Studio of Chicago, IL
undated
8 21 PH111_093: Lillian Russell [portrait in hat, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9.5 x 12.5 inches
Matzene Studio of Chicago, IL
1906
8 22 PH111_094: William Taft [inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9.5 x 13.5 inches
Arris & Ewing
1908
8 23 PH111_095: Professor Wakeman [portrait with unidentified woman]
1.0 photographic print
5 x 7 inches
Drake Brothers
undated
8 24 PH111_096: House in Silverton, Oregon with T.W. Davenport and others
1.0 photographic print
7 x 10 inches
undated
8 25 PH111_097: House in Silverton, Oregon, Davenport Home
1.0 photographic print
3.5 x 5.5 inches
undated
8 26 PH111_098: Nadgran, the Arabian stallion, “One of the World’s Fair Arabians”
1.0 photographic print
8.5 x 13 inches
undated
8 27 PH111_099: [Panel of 5 pictures of woman dressed in Asian clothing (possibly Mary Davenport)]
1.0 photographic print
5 x 12 inches
undated
8 28 PH111_100: [Elegant young woman, inscribed but illegible]
1.0 photographic print
8 x 12 inches
Campbell Studios, Waldorf-Astoria
undated
8 29 PH111_101: Alice Longworth [portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9.5 x 13.5 inches
Harris & Ewing of Washington, D.C.
June 5, 1909
8 30 PH111_102: Philander Colfax [portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9.5 x 13.5 inches
Arris & Ewing
May 24, 1909

^ Return to Top

Series V:  Oversize
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries A: Photographs
Box
Folder
9 1 PH111_103: T.W. Davenport
1.0 photographic print
11 x 14.5 inches
undated
9 2 PH111_104: Judge Waldo, Homer Davenport, FX Matthews, T.W. Davenport [and children, at Expo]
1.0 photographic print
10 x 11.75 inches
Kiser/Lewis & Clark
1905
9 3 PH111_105: Judge Waldo, Homer Davenport, FX Matthews, T.W. Davenport [at Expo]
1.0 photographic print
10 x 11.75 inches
Kiser/Lewis & Clark
1905
9 4 PH111_106: T.W., Homer and Homer Davenport Jr.
1.0 photographic print
10 x 11.75 inches
Drake, John D.
undated
9 5 PH111_107: Homer and Daisy in buggy
1.0 photographic print
11 x 14.5 inches
Cornell of Jersey City, NJ
ca. 1898-1899
9 6 PH111_108: Homer Clyde Davenport and horse [child with buggy horse from #109]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 14.5 inches
Cornell of Jersey City, NJ
ca. 1898-1899
9 7 PH111_109: Bert Gur and young Homer Clyde Davenport [holding gray horse with hood and blanket]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 17 inches
Cornell of Jersey City, NJ
ca. 1898-1899
9 8 PH111_110: Homer Davenport [oval portrait]
1.0 photographic print
9 x 13 inches
undated
9 9 PH111_111: Homer Davenport with his horse [gray]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 17 inches
Cornell of Jersey City, NJ
ca. 1898-1899
9 10 PH111_112: Homer with son Homer Clyde, Daisy with daughter, Mildred [In front of house, with gray horse and carriage]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 17 inches
Cornell of Jersey City, NJ
ca. 1898-1899
9 11 PH111_113: Theodore Roosevelt [portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
10 x 13 inches
Pack of New York
1905
9 12 PH111_114: Thomas Edison [portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
9.5 x 12.5 inches
Munn & Co.
1902
9 13 PH111_115: Homer Davenport’s home in New Jersey [exterior view]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 17 inches
Cornell of Jersey City, NJ
ca 1892
9 14 PH111_116: Davenport Home in Silverton, Oregon. Aunt Martha, Mamma, Papa, Adeliade, Binky [Front view, family in yard]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 13 inches
Jones, W.L. of Silverton
ca 1908
9 15 PH111_117: Clyde Davenport [pencil portrait]
1.0 art original
10 x 13 inches
undated
9 16 PH111_118: Joseph Cannon [portrait, inscribed]
1.0 photographic print
10 x 13 inches
undated
9 17 PH111_119: [Unidentified portait of young man, W.R. Hea?, inscribed to Daisy]
1.0 photographic print
10 x 12 inches
undated
9 18 PH111_120: Mary, Alice, Emery [other names not legible. Amateur theatrical group portrait]
1.0 photographic print
10.5 x 12 inches
Drake Brothers
undated
9 19 PH111_121: President McKinley and Charles W. Fairbanks [Riding in open carriage, inscribed by cousin Fairbanks]
1.0 photographic print
11 x 14.5 inches
November 14, 1907
4 PH111_122: T.W. Davenport and young Homer Clyde [Studio portrait]
1.0 photographic print
14 x 17 inches
Schill, Ludwig of Newark, NJ
undated
4 PH111_123: T.W. Davenport with young Homer Clyde
1.0 photographic print
11 x 14.5 inches
undated
4 PH111_124: [Children in boat on a lake/Newspaper clipping of Davenport cartoon of a Turk]
1.0 photographic print
12 x 17 inches
undated
Subseries B: Legal Documents and Awards
Box
Folder
10 4 Deed, Ralph C. Geer and wife to T.W. Davenport November 14, 1907
10 5 Headquarters Fire Department certificate to Homer Davenport May 5, 1908
10 6 U.S.A. Department of State certificate July 3, 1906
10 7 Salmagundi Club certificate May 3, 1912
10 8 “Homer’s pass to Arabia”
Subseries C: Scrapbooks
Box
Folder
10 9 Scrapbook for T.W. and Homer Davenport
10 10 Scrapbook of Homer Davenport
10 11 Scrapbook of Newspaper Clippings December 15, 1897-February 8, 1898
10 12 Scrapbook of Newspaper Clippings January 29, 1898-June 7, 1898
10 13 Scrapbook of Newspaper Clippings April 13, 1898-October 2, 1898
10 14 Scrapbook of Newspaper Clippings April 17, 1899-1911
Subseries D: Newspaper Clippings
Box
Folder
11 1 Davenport, the Journal’s Cartoonist in London / How things look now-a-days to Davenport
11 2 This is a Bad Year For the Bosses
11 3 Uncle Sam / It Near Killed Uncle / Noah Knickerbocker / Mr. Platt / What’s the Difference Between Being Appointed and Being Elected to the Senate?
11 4 James Whitcomb Riley / Make Your Bets Gentlemen / Paderewski’s Revenge / The Dark Ages / The Latest Craze That We All Have, “Talking Politics”
11 5 Supporting the World’s Gold / Simpson’s Fall; Roosevelt’s Rise
11 6 Platt Seeking to Conciliate / Pesky Things / Here’s To Prosperity / He Thinks I’d Make A Good Mayor / A Row in the Elephant’s House / Prices Advanced for the Benefit of the Workingman / Gen. Benj. F Tracy / Asbury Park’s Prettiest Bathing Girl
11 7 Jimmy Martin- You Dirty Boy / Statesman Simpson / How Speaker Reed Controls Debate
11 8 Long Distance Telephone Company/ Senator Grady/ Congressman William Sulzer / Senator Murphy / Senator McCarren / Humor of the day That Society May Not Have Seen
11 9 Kings in Exile / William Jennings Bryan / “Charlie” Bates
11 10 Third Round Knocked Out / Quigg Before the District leaders / The Mayor Spent Much Time Airing His Room / The Treasure Chest / Thomas McCord / Davenport’s Ideas of the Political Happenings of the Day October 5, 1897
11 11 Some Thoughtful Patriots / Politics and Society Share Honors Wit The Horse / Tom And Tim / A Sign of the Times / Platt Laughs Last
11 12 I Want Yer, Ma Honey, Yes I Do / Platt’s Party Names Wallace Quigg and Willis Meet and Plot Low’s Overthrow / Mr. Howe / Thorn Sat Listlessly All Day / Augustus N. Weller and His Bored Look
11 13 Uncle Sam, The “Monk” and His Master/ Who Says he Can’t Run On A Mowing Machines Ticket / Quay Enters the Tepee of the Great Chief / McKinley-Hobart Cannot Hide the Truth / Rep. Crawford
11 14 Silver or Gold? / Honest Money from J.P. Morgan
11 15 Is That Mr. Quay Going In? / St. John / The (Old) Boy Financer On Free Silver / Academy of Music / Skating Rink / Good-Night
11 16 Mark Hanna As He Is and As Davenport Made Him / Big John L. As He Appeared Against Sharkey
12 1 Homer Davenport’s Idea / Henry Glews /Our Navy, Our Army / Cuba, Under the Heel of Wall Street
12 2 The Spanish-American Situation / Never Touched Him / Article By W. Hearst
12 3 George Dewey, American / The Circus We Always Have With Us
12 4 Article-Two or More Wives
12 5 A Condition, Not A Theory / How Davenport Sees London
12 6 Article- Breeding Arabian Horses in the California Desert
12 7 When Davenport’s in Silverton
12 8 He Will Back It Up / A Six Day Race of Torture / Heroes of the War No. 1 / Heroes of the War No. 2
12 9 There Will Be A Hot Time In the Old Town To-Day! / Mr. Crocker Thinking / The Spanish Navy
12 10 How is Mr. Pulitzer/ Mr. Platt According to Cartoonist Davenport / Corey Regards the Peach with Curiosity / Quigg-Low / Jeremy Owens / State Chairman Hackett
12 11 The New National Gold Party / He Thought We’d Fool Him But We Didn’t / Now for Prosperity / The Platt and Black Teams in Tug of War / Crooked Claw, The Pawnee, Talks of Chances / Lauterbach Admits He Is Back in the Fight
12 12 A Modest Proposal/ Now You See It and Now You Don’t / A Humble Petition / The Leaning Tower of Plattism / Hanna / How Dingley Looks
12 13 Senator Stewart, Who is a Hot Poet / Col. James Hamilton Lewis / Mr. Platt Gets the President’s Ear / As Platt Would Like It / How We Should Help Cuba / James Hude Beekman / Joyce Taking A Bounder
12 14 Anti-Cartoon Bill, They Never Liked Cartoons / Croker returns to Yankee Soil / It Is To Laugh / Your Honor I Have Seen These Women At All Hours of the Night / Deliver Us From The Kansas? Mr. Sizer
12 15 The Dead Instructing The Living / A Buzzard Punctured / The Great White Filibuster / In A Hole / Singular Backsliding of the High Mr. Low
12 16 Satan Rebuking Sin/ Senator Morgan/ Uncle Sam- It’s About Time I Put An End To This / Uncle Sam- Pardon Me Mr. Havemeyer / Jake Patterson, Gives Heed To Quigg / Wicked Gibbs is Athirst
12 17 Platt Was There In Spirit / Havemeyer and Searles Listen To The Sugar of Lawyers / Their Share / The Trusts / Why The Easy Boss is Uneasy / Senator Mitchell / Secretary Alger
12 18 Quigg Was There In Person / What Should We Do Next For The Good Of The Masses? / He Didn’t Know T’was Loaded / Divine Healer / War dance in the House of Representatives / Senator Wetmore / Articles- Sherman Against Expansion, Washington’s Glory Gone, McKinley Leans Spainward, W.J. Bryan Accepts the Trust, Pennsylvania’s Hungry Slaves of the Mine
12 19 The Cornfield Handshake / M.M. Ester / Republican Convention
12 20 How Prosperity Struck The Land / Phil May’s Gutter-Snipes / Quigg Ponders / Lauterbach Feels wronged / The Arrival of the Great Chinaman / Thorn an Accessory / McKinley- Advanced Agents of Prosperity / Senator Hannon is Attentive / Mr. Simpson Spoke for 7 And A Half Minutes
12 21 “I Met Hanna Again And He Said He Was Glad”-Davenport / Hill Has Spoken / Joseph H. Choate, the Defender of the Trusts / A Jury That Ought To Please Mr. Choate / A War With Spain? / Vote for McKinley and Prosperity / Hanna, Dingley and Aldrich Secretly Confer / Pepper Box Chandler, Rises to a Question
12 22 Illustrating A Tale That Is True With A Moral That Is New / Grover Goes A-Gunning / The Kind of Candidate Mr. Crocker Would Like / Van Wyck for Mayor / The New Baby Elephant in the Political Zoo
13 1 When A Man Hunts Tigers He Doesn’t Care for Other Game
13 2 A Cartoonist Diary- On the Events of the Past Week As Seen by Davenport / Homer davenport Cartoonist / I Guess the Powers Wont Interfere if I stop that
13 3 One of Oregon’s Most Wonderful Products / Squaring the Account / Forward March / The Stern face of Victory
13 4 Jim Corrbet as He Looks To-Day / Homer Davenport Dons / Keep your Peanuts and Meat to Yourselves
13 5 Davenport Goes the Limit with Kid M’Coy, But Claims He Wasn’t Treated Right / Training For The Fall Campaign / Germany will Erect this Statue to Bismark
13 6 An International Hymn / Making Use Of Him While They Have Him / How Have The Great Man Shrunk What Artist Swinnerton at Coney Island
13 7 A Marion County Boy’s Fame
13 8 The Wonderful Canal That Black Built /Pizen Tom At Play / Singular Timidity of a Steed
13 9 War Heroes, No. 3 / The Kind of Smoking That Hurts / Training for the fall campaign/ Decoration Day, 1899 / Dog days in the Torture Chamber / Too Hot For Politics
13 10 No Wonder Sharkey Swings / The Race and Brutal Baboon of the Desert
13 11 No Assistance Wanted / Old Money Bags is a Bit Nervous
13 12 The Last days of Spain / The Old Man Refuses to be Comforted / Spain’s Ships Would Never Brave this Coast
13 13 Davenport’s Wall Street Studies No. 4, 5, 6, 7 / Who said War
13 14 Cartoonist Davenport’s Impressions of the Great Beef Conspiracy Against Our Soldiers Health / Armed with Nothin’ But Red Light Whiskey / Articles- Should married Women Follow Professional careers, The man with the hoe
13 15 Would Dewey like this?/ The Gauntlet is Down / Fitzsimmons Head by Davenport / Presidential Possibilities / It Is To Laugh / A Question Answered
13 16 Once More The Power Of The Press / Uncle Sam And Uncle George Agree / Presidential Possibilities / A Job for Grover
13 17 The Great Issue for 1900 / I Wish The Circus Was Over / John Clark, In Thought
13 18 Article- Deyr, Oldest Arabian Horse in America, Dies
13 19 Davenport in the Syrian Desert
13 20 Our Best Citizenship / Irreparable Loss / The Cuban Mother / Article- The White Mouse in the White House
13 21 Homer Davenport Inquires / Like a Chicken With it’s Head Off / The Red Tape Nurse / Davenport Pictures Kelly-Sullivan Fight
13 22 A Recent Incident of Democratic Life at Saratoga / After the War Wave Rolled back / That’s the Mayor / Honor the Gunner
14 1 Article from Oregon Journal: October 10, 1937. “Davenports First Model October 10, 1937
14 2 Davenport Pleads For Animals Tortured to Make Man’s Pleasure
14 3 Article and Drawings by Homer Davenport in the Evening Mail, "From East to West 60 Years Ago and Now" September 11, 1909
14 4 Article-Homer Davenport and some of the Magnificent Horses He Brought from Arabia
14 5 Los Angeles Examiner September 5, 1934
14 6 Which is Better, To Slay or to Study?
14 7 The Oregonian Sunday Magazine, Picture and drawings of Homer Davenport October 30, 1949
14 8 Murderer a Gentleman Compared to the Kidnapper / Article- A plea for the Horse, with handwritten note on side
14 9 Article- Homer Davenport’s Genius Shown First By Work for the Oregonian
14 10 Article- Marriage Combination Travesty In My Case, Says Homer Davenport
14 11 Speaker Champ Clark / Article by Homer Davenport
14 12 Martyrs to Avarice and Indifference
14 13 Article- History’s Twelve Greatest Dates
14 14 Articles- Los Angeles Times May 18, 1932
14 15 Articles- Los Angeles Times March 8, 1925
14 16 Article- Sunday Oregonian, “Homer Davenport: Went South With Banner Of West" January 28, 1945
14 17 A Plea for Man’s Most Faithful Friend
14 18 From East to West, 60 Years Ago and Now
14 19 In The Globe, A Series of Cartoons, beginning to-morrow, by Homer Davenport December 9, 1910
14 20 Lets Buy Mother A New Axe
14 21 Which is Better, To Slay or To Study?
14 22 Hanna Forced Out Of Power
14 23 The Best Dog Story That Davenport Ever Told
14 24 The Hearst Papers’ 50 Year Fight With the Nicaraguan Canal
15 1 A Little Flirtation
15 2 No Personal Heroism / McKinely Snubs /Holding them up to Public Scorn
15 3 Facsimile of Bismarck’s letter / Congressman W.D. Bynum of Indiana / Williams and McKinley / Hanna Safe
15 4 Mr. Bryan pleased / Collis, Assailed by Reynolds / Getting Acquainted / Fair Minded Society Cheers an English Winner
15 5 Vacation Series Sketch No. 1, 2, 3 / Confession up to date / Gen Tracy is in the race For Good
15 6 Hard Luck, McClellan / The Secret of Mr. Bryan’s Voice / Paul Lawrence Dunbar
15 7 Why Will He Wait Till It Breaks? / Gold Bites the Dust
15 8 Captain Dodd’s Display of Tricky Troopers at the Madison Square Garden / Articles- An outside Judgment / The Prophesies of the press with the Quotations of the Stock Exchange / Are the American People Simpletons
15 9 Thomas C. Platt As Seen by the Caricaturists of the Day / Some More Types / The Adjutant Boss / Thou Wert that all to me / Canvassed
15 10 Indiana / George Du Maurier
15 11 Some Attitudes of Governor John P. Altgeld at the Cooper Union meeting / Lauterbach and Quigg / Hanna (Expostulating)
15 12 Preliminary Practice at Lakewood / Ready for Business / Fitzsimmons Observes the Courtesy of the Highway and says “Good Morning, gents.”
15 13 Strengthening Platt’s Quigg / M’Kinley’s Eye On A New Term
15 14 Mr. Hill of Humbolt / Alvinza Hayward’s Breastplate / Hanna Moves A Public Building Bill / Major Gillis / Quay and Hanna / Morehouse / The Shaming of Morehouse / Mr. Pulitzer at the Morgue / The Awful Tyranny of Speaker Reed
15 15 Where Mr. Hanna Stands on the Labor Question / Estee Holding his reception / Uncle Sam: “Accident?”
15 16 Mr. Bryan Speaking in Front of the City Hall at Albany / Scrambling back / Sixteen to One
15 17 James J. Martin / John C. Sheehan / James P. Keating / Ex-Mayor Malloy of Troy / Henry D. Purroy / James W. Boyle and Ex-Judge White / Senator Butler, of South Carolina / Hanna is Obliged to Invent One for Bryan / Where Mr. Hanna Stands on the Labor Question
15 18 It’s Strong Against Low and the Union / Bound to See McKinley into the White House / Washington characters as Kemble Sees Them / Mr. Bailey of Texas / “Wicked” Fred Gibbs / Colonel Tom Coakley / The Daily Round in Corbet’s Training Quarters, as Davenport Sees It / Corbett As He Appears to Davenport / Fighting Tiger
15 19 A Man Well In Hand / What Stricken One has Me Uplifted / C. Henry Genslinger and His Mis Stars / To Heavy a Load to Carry / The Doubtful States by Counties---- Kentucky For Bryan
15 20 The Push And Its Obstacles / J. E. David / Davenport’s Impressions of the Horse Show
15 21 Senator Jones, of Arkansas / Senator Hill of New York / He Would Make Our Tariff
15 22 Nelson W. Dingley / Bringing in the Heavy-Weight / Homer Davenport in Paris
15 23 The Final Charge of the Buncombe Brigade / How Can He Loose Me
15 24 Low to Cleveland / Low’s Letter / Stand back I Will Take Care Of This Old Man / Wont Someone Please Give Me A Canadite
15 25 A Pull That Proved Stronger Than The Blinds Pool’s / There’s a Hot Time in the Old Tent To-Night
15 26 The Blow It Near Killed Father / A Few Really Pertinent Question / Naughty Lona and Husband
16 1 Three Old Sports From Oklahoma/ Uncle Sam: “That D--- Parrot Can’t Talk
16 2 Three Old Sports From Oklahoma / Uncle Sam: “That D--- Parrot Can’t Talk
16 3 Fitzsimmons as He Appears to Homer Davenport
16 4 Alas! Poor Fido! / The Press To the Rescue / Calling Out the Reserves / De Lome Joins the Pulitzer / See That Hump
16 5 Some of the People Seen By Davenport At the Saratoga Convention
16 6 I am a Democrat Perhaps
16 7 Alfred Henry Lewis / Mr. Davenport at Work / Mr. Johnson told Me I Could Use His Studio / Dingley
16 8 A Man of Mark / A Fable for Both Kinds Of Democrats
16 9 A Winner / Mark Hanna and His Protégé
16 10 The Gold Standard/ Hanna to the Voter / Hanna / Tom Reed / John M. Palmer / Scene and Incidents During the Dixon-White Fight at the Broadway
16 11 Democracy- It’s about time to Scratch Off That Score / Two Prominent Figures At Buffalo
16 12 If You See It In The Sun You’re Lucky/ Did He Fall Or Was He Pushed?/ Sending Quigg to Strong/ Elephant
16 13 Alvinza Hayward and His Moffet Listened Eagerly / Senator Voorheis of Amandor / Here’s to You / Increased Activity Among The “Active Members.” / Elise Searing
16 14 Strike Talk Often Leads To A Lockout / The Nations Hero / Will The People Vote To Make It Real
16 15 The Foul Power Of The Trusts At Washington / A Composite of the House / A Composite Picture of the U.S. Senate / What Arbitration Means For Uncle Sam / Quay Brooding over The Question / No, William: Nothing More At Present, Thank You / Beckley Gets a High One
16 16 Vacation Series 4, 5, 6 / Lou Payn / Mr. Platt Thinks There’s Too Much Sameness About This Procession / The Situation Is Obvious
16 17 Infant Industry Mack / Senator Percy Henderson / Senator Dunn / Uncle Sam: How They Did Fool Me and the People / Some Fun In Registration Day Doings
16 18 When Stuff Meets Stuff / Some Ink Splashes at the Walcott-“Scaldy Bill” Fight
16 19 The Paynful Situation At Albany / The republican Senators Hear of Havemeyer’s Escape / Sheehan Calling the Convention to Order / Principal persons Connected with the International Arbitrary Treaty
16 20 A Democratic Rise In Ohio / A Diminutive Chip of The Old Block / The Artistic Set In Paris- As Seen By Homer Davenport / Can Black Land Him?/ The Bridegroom, Senator Platt / All Hands Against The Biggest Boss / The Three at the Left Are Opposing The Three at the Right
16 21 A Venetian Episode / Platt Revives Strong and War begins / Sherman is McKinley’s Bogie
17 1 An Artist’s Tribute to the Memory of His Father
17 2 14,00 Miles, 500 Speeches, and Mr. Bryan still as vigorous as ever
17 3 Croker Sings: “Oh, Come, My Love, to Me,” We May Not Abide by the Result / We May Not Abide by the Result, Strong and Quigg Discuss the Prospects of Low’s Withdrawal, Mr. Buck Duke’s “Niggah” Friend
17 4 An Ideal Cabinet for a Plutocratic President, The “Push” and its obstacles, _____ states by counties-- no.2—Ohio
17 5 He did it-But it was death to the mule, The Elephant no goes round and round, the band begins to play, Some types of the horseshow face
17 6 Crispi Thinks It an Example for Italy
17 7 Let’s Have a Little Fun with Him, General Rejoicing After the Nomination
17 8 Men I Have Sketched 1911
17 9 John Davenport, Colfax, With “Chinned” Beard
17 10 The Saturday Evening Mail cover July 14, 1906
17 11 Dog Stories By Davenport, I. ‘Old Fly’ February 12, 1907
17 12 Dog Stories By Davenport, II. Bob and Pup February 13, 1907
17 13 Dog Stories By Davenport, III. Prince the Martyr February 14, 1907
17 14 “Given An Ovation, Homer Davenport Lectures at the White Temple" sometime after 1906
17 15 “The Arabian Horses,” by P.M. Babcock August 3, 1918
17 16 “Cradle of the Trotting Horse,” by Earl Chapin May 4, 1929
17 17 “Sheepskins for Thoroughbreds,” by Bozeman Bulger November 21, 1931
17 18 “Bits for Breakfast,” by R.J. Hendricks undated
17 19 “And the World Spins On,” by O.O. McIntyre undated
17 20 “Flashlight of City Hall wedding at which the Mayor officiated” undated
Subseries E: Homer Davenport Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
18 1 S.E. Kiser poem, “The Missing One,” signed October 6, 1898
18 2 Book, The Dollar or the Man, by Homer Davenport, copy inscribed for T.W. Davenport 1900
18 3 “My announcements that the mayor got out just before he died, to James B. Pond, 1903” 1903
18 4 J.W. Crawford poem, “I am bigger and stronger today by far,” signed July 19, 1906
18 5 Tag from the Western Tour of Col. Theodore Roosevelt August 23, 1910-September 11, 1910
18 6 Card with J. W. Crawford poem, “Bronte”
18 7 Small picture of Arab horse, Mrs. Davenport and her daughter on the Kellogg ranch
18 8 Remington and Davenport
18 9 Advertisements for Homer Davenport’s autobiography, The Country Boy
18 10 Ostrich drawing by Homer Davenport
18 11 “I went with sister to see Clara Morris in Camile,” by Homer Davenport
18 12 “Father surveyed a lot,” by Homer Davenport
18 13 Personalized stationery and envelope
Subseries F: Original Cartoons by Homer Davenport
These are housed in flat file cases and are not currently indexed. Please check with staff for access to these cartoons.

^ Return to Top

Subjects

  • Personal Names :
  • Davenport, Homer, 1867-1912
  • Davenport, T.W. (Timothy Woodbridge)
  • Roosevelt, Theodore, 1858-1919
  • Stevens, Hazard, 1842-1918
  • Family Names :
  • Davenport family--Archives
  • Geographical Names :
  • Oregon National Historic Trail
  • Oregon--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Umatilla Indian Reservation (Or.)
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1965
  • Subject Terms :
  • Arabian horse--Breeding
  • Cartoonists--United States
  • Indian agents--Oregon
  • Political cartoons
  • Umatilla Indians

    ^ Return to Top