Guide to the Western Washington University Centennial Oral History Project Records
1975-2000

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Overview of the Collection

Creator: Center for Pacific Northwest Studies
Title: Western Washington University Centennial Oral History Project Records
Dates: 1975-2000 ( inclusive )
1988-2000 ( bulk )
Quantity: 6 Linear feet (14 Hollinger Boxes)
Collection Number: XOE_CPNWS0075wwuoralhist
Summary: The Western Washington University Centennial Oral History Project Records documents the reflections of various faculty, staff, presidents and other administrators of the university from its origins as Bellingham Normal School to its current university status for the celebration of of its centennial.
Repository: Western Washington University
Heritage Resources

Center for Pacific Northwest Studies
Goltz-Murray Building
808 25th St
Bellingham, WA 98225-9123
Phone: 360 650 7747
Email: heritage.resources@wwu.edu
http://library.wwu.edu/heritageresources

Languages: Collection materials are in English. 
Sponsor: Funding for preparing this finding aid was provided through a grant awarded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. Funding for encoding the finding aid was awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Historical Note

The WWU Centennial Oral History Project was initiated in 1993 by a dedicated group of staff and faculty. The goal of the project was the development of oral history interviews for use in the planned centennial celebration at Western Washington University, commemorating 100 years of scholarly achievement. The result was an invaluable set of interviews, which document the history of the University and supplements the archival record. The history of WWU actually dates to 1893, when Washington State Governor, John H. McGraw signed legislation approving the creation of the Bellingham Normal School, but due to lack of funding, the school did not open until the fall of 1899. Bellingham Normal School became Western Washington School of Education in 1937, then Western Washington State College in 1961, and finally achieved university status in 1977.

The Centennial project provides information and presents a wide range of viewpoints documenting the university's growth and achievements over the past century. The individuals that project organizers sought to interview include former university faculty, staff, trustees, and alumni. The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies coordinated this project and expects it to expands as more interviews take place beyond Western's 1999 centennial.

Content Description

This collection includes oral histories, audio tapes and transcripts documenting the development of Western Washington University. Most of the interviews were commissioned as part of the University's Centennial Celebration. and were conducted with former faculty, staff, and students whose connections to Western date from roughly 1920 to 2000. They deal with campus history, focusing particularly on the administrations of Dr. William Haggard, Dr. James Jarrett, Dr. Harvey Bunke, Dr. Jerry Flora and Dr. Paul Olscamp. The collection also includes several departmental histories, including Departments of Education, Geography, Humanities and Political Science. Several interviews focus on the development of Fairhaven College, Huxley College of the Environment and the College of Ethnic studies as well as the formation of the College of Fine and Performing Arts.

The oral histories reflect the evolution of Western from its genesis as a normal school to a liberal arts college to a multi-disciplined regional university. Through the interviews, researchers can gain a sense of that transition, as well as the complexities of the inter-relationships between administration, faculty and students.

Use of the Collection

Restrictions on Access :  

Some access restrictions apply. Contact repository for details.

Restrictions on Use :  

Some use restrictions apply. Contact repository for details.

Preferred Citation :  

Western Washington University Centennial Oral History Project Records, Center for Pacific Northwest Studies, Heritage Resources, Western Washington University, Bellingham WA 98225-9123.

Administrative Information

Arrangement :

The Western Washington University Oral History Project Records is arranged in accordance with the following series arrangement

  • Series 1: Transcripts and Summaries, 1975-2000
  • Series 2: Audiocassette Recordings, 1988-2000

Detailed Description of the Collection

The following section contains a detailed listing of the materials in the collection.

Series I:  Transcripts and Summaries, 1975-2000
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries I: Paper transcripts and summaries 1975-2000
Box/Folder
1/1 Adams, Henry L. interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Henry L. Adams, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, joined Western's faculty in 1957. He discussed the changes in administration from President William Haggard to President James Jarrett. He recalled his role as the first chairman of the new honors programs. He discussed his relationship with faculty members Herb Taylor, Arthur Hicks, and Jerry Flora among others. He also recalled Paul Woodring’s aspirations for Fairhaven College. Dr. Adams reminisced about Chuck Harwood. He discussed the era of the “flower children” in the 1960s and the effect of the Vietnam War on Western. He talked of influential individuals such as Thad Spratlen, Angelo Anastasio, Erwin Mayer, and Don Blood. He then told of the changes in the psychology department and ended with a discussion of changes in the honors and general studies programs. This folder also contains a history of the Psychology Department to 1983 written by Dr. Henry Adams. Transcript of interview available.
2000 July 5
1/2 Aitken, Margaret H. interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr. Margaret H. Aitken, Chair of the combined women’s and men’s Physical Education Department and chair of the Women’s Department, came to Western in 1946 to join the Physical Education Department. She left in the 1950s to pursue a doctorate degree, but later returned to the department. She discussed the change in women's sports from casual intramural events to intercollegiate athletics. She briefly recounted the administrative change from President William Haggard to Dr. James Jarrett. Dr. Aitken also talked about the growth of the university during her years there. In 1964, she became the chair of the Women’s Department. In 1972, President Jerry Flora combined the men's and women’s Physical Education Departments and appointed Dr. Aitken the new department chair. She recounted problems faced by the newly combined department and also talked about the impact of Title IX on women’s athletics. She told of the lack of turmoil in the Physical Education Department during the 1960s and 1970s when other areas saw unrest. This folder also contains newspaper articles and other documents relating to Dr. Aitken’s years at Western. Transcript of interview available.
1996 July 8
1/3 Anastasio, Angelo interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Angelo Anastasio, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology, joined the Western faculty in 1954. He discussed the administrations of Presidents William Haggard and Dr. James Jarrett. He also discussed the increase in bureaucracy during his time at Western as well as the creation of the Sociology/Anthropology department. He recounted the effect of the Vietnam War on the university. He discussed the administrations of various presidents including William Haggard, James Jarrett, Harvey Bunke, Jerry Flora, Paul Olscamp, and Robert Ross. He also identified several individuals who he believed were instrumental to the history of Western, including Keith Murray, Herb Taylor, and Arthur Hicks. Transcript of interview available.
1993 May 27
1/4 Arnett, Chappelle interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr.Chappelle Arnett, Professor of Physical Education, chair of Physical Education Department, joined the faculty of the Women’s Physical Education Department in the 1960s. She spoke of her relationship with Ruth Weythman, then chair of the department. She also discussed the merger of the men's and women’s departments and the election of Margaret Aitken as chair. She told of the hard times and the support the department received from various faculty, including President Jerry Flora. During her tenure, several physical education faculty members left Western, including Bill Tomaras and Don Peterson. She discussed her appointment as department chair and the changes that occurred at the time. She recalled her work on sexual stereotypes and with “Project Active” which focused on sexual equality and elementary schools. Dr. Arnett then discussed the changes brought about by Title IX and how Linda Goodrich, Kathy Knutsen, and Terry McMahon effectively used it. She then discussed changes in women’s athletics and told of the differences between Western and other state institutions. Dr. Arnett discussed staff attitudes to the reductions in force (R.I.F.'s) in the department. She talked about the department's relationship with other programs on campus and her interactions with retired faculty. This folder also contains newspaper articles and other information about Chappelle Arnett. Transcript of interview available.
1996 July 2
1/5 Benner, Rick interviewed by Steve Inge
Mr. Rick Benner, Facilities Planning Manager at Western Washington University, became Western Washington University's Planning Manager in 1987. His job was to remain faithful to the 1968 George Bartholick campus design when planning for further University development. In 1974, a Facilities Development Plan was created to take into account a larger student population. In 1989, the campus plan was changed to account for fewer projected students and a need for added structural development to accommodate expanded programs in the sciences. In addition Mr. Brenner mentioned the difficulties of finding more space for the campus without infringing on the city of Bellingham. Transcript of interview available.
1999 April 1
1/6 Boles, Jerry interviewed by Steve Inge
Mr. Jerry Boles, Vice Provost for Information and Telecommunication Services, arrived at Western in 1991 to assume the new position of vice provost of information services. He recalled that his first priority was to establish a technological infrastructure. He discussed a project to automate the library and early attempts to link campus technologically. Boles also discussed the drive to provide faculty and students access to computers and workrooms. He discussed potential changes in campus technology in the years ahead. He mentions those who were key to technological change such as Larry DeLorme, Marie Eaton, Ken Mortimer, Karen Morse, and Pete Elich. Transcript of interview available.
1999 April 21
1/7 Bond, Mary interviewed by Lynne Masland
Mary E. Bond, was connected to Western on several levels. She was the daughter-in-law of Elias A. Bond, a Western alumnus, the wife of former faculty member E.A. “Nick” Bond, and she attended the campus school as a youth. Mary Bond discussed her education at Western from the time she attended the campus school in Old Main in 1923 though her graduation from Western in 1937. She recounted stories about her father-in-law, Dr. E.A. Bond. She discussed the role Dr. Bond and Carroll Haeske in the purchase of Lakewood, Western's property on Lake Whatcom. She also recalled Dr. Bond starting the recreation program at WWU. She also discussed each of Dr. Bond’s children and their careers. She explained various family pictures. She recounted the Bond family's relationship with Alan Ross. She told of her marriage to Elden “Nick” Bond, his career, and his time in the navy. She then talked about her children and her youngest son’s career as well as her mother-in-law's role in creating the Faculty Dames. The Interview with Mary Bond continued on January 26, 1996. In this session, Mrs. Bond continued her discussion of the Faculty Dames and the evolution of that group into the Women of Western. She also mentioned Mr. Kibbe. She discussed the personal struggles of President Charles Fisher's family. She recalled that she completed her student teaching at the campus school. She then discussed the development of the home economics department. She talked about members of the faculty including Leona Sundquist, Mabel Zoe Wilson, Miriam Snow Mathes, Coach Lappenbusch, Dean Marquis, Irving E. Miller, and Mr. Phillipi. Transcript of interview available.
1995 December 3; 1996 January 26
1/8 Bouverat, Roberta interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr. Roberta Wong Bouverat, alumnus of Western, Professor of Education, came to Western in 1955 where she completed her Bachelor of Arts degree and her Master’s degree. She talked about her eventual return to Western to teach and her relationship with Dr. Bearnice Skeen. She discussed the advantages of being a student at Western especially in the field of education. She mentioned specific teachers such as Ruby McInnis, Van Wingerden, and Mabel Hodges. She also recounted stories about undergraduate teachers like Dr. Arntzen, Dr. Blood, and Dr. Taylor. She discussed campus life from the view of both a student and a teacher. She remembered, while a student, working in the nurse’s office. Dr. Bouverat joined the faculty at Western in the 1970s. She recalled teaching early childhood education and the lack of departmental support. She retired in 1990 and continued teaching elsewhere. She discussed the change in the expectations of Education students from the 1950s to 1980s. She discussed changes in her own work on early childhood education with programs like Head Start. She talked about her life since she retired from Western and discussed the change in the education program from a program, to a school, to a college. Transcript of interview available.
1996 July 9
1/9 Brewster, Laurence interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Laurence W. Brewster, Professor Emeritus of the Speech Department, was hired by Dr. William Haggard in 1948. He held a position in the Speech and theater department along with Mr. Victor Hoppe and Mr. Sene Carlile. Dr. Brewster split the teaching of speech classes with Mr. Hoppe and Mr. Carlile and handled radio work on KVOS. He took charge of several radio programs including College Newsweek in Review, Faculty Speaks, and Poets and Poetry. With the retirement of Mr. Hoppe in 1952, Dr. Brewster and Mark Flanders took charge of the theater department. The Speech department originally controlled the Theater department until the early 1970s when Dr. Bill Gregory helped form the College of Fine and Performing Arts. Dr. Brewster also talked about the Curriculum Committee, a committee to decide on the addition or deletion of courses in departments. Dr. Brewster spoke highly of Dr. Haggard – both his control of the school and his honesty. He also discussed the entertainment programs the college sponsored in the 1950s. Sometimes the college brought in famous individuals such as Burl Ives, Edward Weeks, and Vincent Price. He also discussed the turbulence on campus in the 1960s as a result of the Vietnam War. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 2
1/10 Brewster, Laurence interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Laurence W. Brewster, Professor Emeritus of Speech and Theatre Dr. Laurence Brewster was hired in 1948 by President William Haggard. Originally Dr. Brewster focused on classes in radio and speech. He also took charge of College Newsweek in Review, a live radio program broadcast from KVOS every Friday. In addition, he ran radio programs called Faculty Speaks and Poets and Poetry. When Mr. Victor Hoppe, the theatre director, retired in 1952 Dr. Brewster took over. Dr. Brewster became the first person to direct a play on the stage in the Performing Arts Center. (Mr. Hoppe felt that the auditorium in the Performing Arts Center was too big and so he put on The Merchant of Venice in the foyer before he retired). Dr. Brewster also directed the first two musicals, Martha and Die Fledermous, at Western. He also mentioned the changing relationships between faculty and students at Western as the school grew. Transcript of interview available.
1999 March 23
1/11 Broad, Carter interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Carter Broad, Professor Emeritus of Biology, joined the Western faculty in 1963 as a professor and chairman of the Biology department. The Biology department started its masters program in 1966, and Dr. Broad felt this improved the department overall. He talked about the changing emphasis of teaching and research at Western over the years. Dr. Broad also mentioned his field experience in Alaska in connection with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Bureau of Land Management. They looked at the beach component of the effects of off-shore oil drilling in the Alaskan Arctic. This project involved people from the Biology department, Huxley College and Fairhaven College. He also discussed the history of Huxley College. Dr. Broad did not find Western in the 1960s to be too tumultuous since disturbances never escalated to the levels found at Berkeley. Overall, Dr. Broad showed a great affection for Western. Transcript of interview available.
1993 February 26
1/12 Brown, Willard interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Willard A. Brown, Professor Emeritus of Physics and Astronomy, discussed his work in the Navy during World War II. He received his Bachelor's degree in physics from the University of Washington and then worked at Boeing as a research analyst on guided missile systems. He discussed teaching high school on Bainbridge Island. He was hired by Western in 1956 during President William Haggard's administration as a supervisor of student teachers. Dr. Brown received his Master's degree from Washington State University at that time. He discussed losing the opportunity for tenure during President James Jarrett's administration due to the requirement of a Doctoral degree. Dr. Brown discussed receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Florida. He returned to Western in 1966. He discussed President Haggard and the changes brought by President Jarrett. He discussed the Humanities program. He talked about President Harvey Bunke. He also talked about the history of the Physics department. Dr. Brown described his association with the Science Education Group. He discussed his department's loss of the Master's degree in Science in the late 1970s. He also discussed the addition of Astronomy to the Physics department. Dr. Brown described his committee work at Western. He discussed presidents Jerry Flora, Ken Mortimer and Robert Ross. He also discussed changes in faculty and students over the course of his career.
1993 April 23
1/13 Bruce, Robert interviewed by Steve Inge
Mr. Robert Bruce, AIA and campus planner at Western Washington University, is an employee of Western Washington University as well as maintaining a private practice. Mr. Bruce came to Western in 1967. At first he worked on small projects and restorations. Eventually, President Ken Mortimer asked him to participate in developing a campus master plan. The building of Western’s campus has always presented a challenge because of the number of different environments (bogs, bedrock, hills, valleys). Mr. Bruce also discussed the problems of parking on campus and acquiring new property. He talked about various spaces available to the University for further development. He also discussed the future communications building. Transcript of interview available.
1999 April 21
1/14 Buckland, Roscoe interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Roscoe L. Buckland, Professor Emeritus of Liberal Studies, joined Western's faculty in 1970 during President Jerry Flora's administration. Dr. Buckland described his role in forming the Liberal Studies program at Western. In addition, Dr. Buckland helped organize conferences and visits from notable speakers such as Wayne Morse (senator from Oregon), Nicholas Von Hoffman (commentator from Washington D.C.), and Joseph Campbell. He also acted as chair of the General Education Committee and administrator of the General Education Program. Transcript of interview available.
1993 June 1
1/15 Bulcroft, Kris interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Kris Bulcroft, Associate Professor of Sociology and Special Assistant to the Provost for Teaching and Learning, joined the faculty of Western Washington University in the winter of 1990 as a temporary professor in the Sociology department. The professor she stood in for died in a plane accident. Dr. Inge Paulus and Dr. Carl Simpson supported her and she eventually gained tenure. In 1993 Dr. Bulcroft got an Excellence in Teaching Award and in 1994 she acted as Faculty Senate President. She also worked with Dr. Larry DeLorme on distance education. Together they started the Center for Instructional Innovation and the Freshman Interest Group program. Dr. Bulcroft worked during both the Ken Mortimer administration and the Karen Morse administration.Transcript of interview available.
1999 January 21
1/16 Bunke, Harvey interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Harvey C. Bunke was the President of Western Washington State College from 1965 to 1967. He recalled how isolated Bellingham was at the time and felt the college needed new people and ideas. Dr. Bunke challenged the traditional formula by which state funds were allocated to colleges which in turn caused conflict with the president of the University of Washington, Dr. Odegaard. He also conflicted with the strongest trustee on the board, Marshall Forrest. Dr. Bunke also started Fairhaven College and the Western Foundation. The student body government demand to invite Timothy Leary to speak on campus led to Dr. Bunke's resignation. While Dr. Bunke planned to let him speak, the trustees did not fully agree. Timothy Leary was allowed to speak but Dr. Bunke resigned under pressure from the Board. Jerry Flora then took over as president. Transcript of interview available.
2000 August 29
1/17 Cary, Meridith interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr. Meridith Cary, Professor of English, joined Western's faculty in 1964. In 1972, she and Marge Ryan team-taught a Women’s literature course. She also helped design and promote the Women’s Studies program at Western acting as manager for the first five years. She described a period when the administration cut faculty from all departments, and remembered that the English department faculty handled it with distinction. Dr. Cary has also authored works in a number of different genres. This folder contains a number of articles and bulletins from the Public Information Office at Western.Transcript of interview available.
undated; 1996 June 25
1/18 Clothier, Nita interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Nita Clothier, Professor Emeritus of Liberal Studies, started at western in 1947 as a student. She remembered the campus and faculty fondly, including President William Haggard. During Dr. Clothier’s student days the staff included a dean for men and a dean for women. In 1952, she came back to Western for her BA and to teach. She discussed in detail the transformation of courses through the 1960s and 1970s. She also started the study-abroad program Western in Greece in 1978. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 12
1/19 Collier, Robert interviewed by Don Eklund and Todd Welch
Dr. Robert P. Collier was the dean and chairman of the Department of Business and Economics. Dr. Collier held the position of dean of the College of Business and Economics at Western for twenty-three years. After piloting in World War II, and teaching in several colleges, Dr. Collier joined Western in 1976. He was the first dean of the College of Business and Economics. He also started the masters program in Business and Economics. Dr. Collier felt that President Paul Olscamp did not give the College of Business and Economics the support they deserved. It took fourteen years for the program to become accredited. Despite problems with administration, Dr. Collier looked back with fondness for his students and his work. Even after retirement, he kept busy by serving on the Board of Directors of the Western Washington University Retiree’s Association. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 5
1/20 Critchfield, Howard interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Howard J. Critchfield, Professor Emeritus of Geography, joined the faculty of Western Washington College of Education in 1951, during Dr. William Haggard’s presidency. In 1952-53, the college began to offer a Bachelor of Arts degree in Geography. Dr. Critchfield also recalled the importance of the Curriculum Committee in making academic organizational decisions. He felt this was especially true during James Jarrett’s presidency. According to Dr. Critchfield, Dr. Artzen held the most important place on this committee. During President Jarrett’s administration the few big departments – Social Science, Science, and so on- were split into smaller departments. In 1966, the Geography department began to offer a master's degree. Dr. Critchfield remembered the stresses caused by the Vietnam War – especially on male students who needed to keep their grades up to avoid being the draft. The faculty also felt stress in the early 1970s when the school needed to make budget cuts. Dr. Critchfield acted as State Climatologist starting in 1976. He also helped develop the map library along with Dr. Bob Monahan. Transcript of interview available.
1993 April 13
1/21 Davis, James interviewed by James Scott
Dr. James W. Davis, Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, joined Western's faculty in 1974. At that time, there occurred a reduction in force (R.I.F.). Many non-tenured faculty took Western to court for cutting their positions. In 1975, Dr. Jerry Flora’s presidency ended. During the R.I.F. the creation of some colleges took place while others disappeared. For a time, Fairhaven almost vanished. Outside of school Dr. Davis was active in politics and was one of the founders of the Visitor and Convention Bureau. He also spoke highly of Western’s library and its director at the time, Ray McInnis. Transcript of interview available.
1993 June 30
1/22 Davis, James interviewed by James Scott
Dr. James W. Davis, Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, joined the faculty of Western in 1974, which was the last year of President Jerry Flora’s administration. He served under Jerry Anderson, Vice President for Academic Affairs. During his first year, a recession in Washington State and very low enrollment caused a reduction in force (R.I.F.) in the faculty. He discussed in detail its effects and the extreme tension it created. He also helped establish the computer science department in his last year as dean (the early 1980s). Dr. Davis also recalled the hiring of Anne Dillard, the novelist, for an English position. Transcript of interview available.
1999 June 17
1/23 DeLorme, R. L. interviewed by Sam Kelly
Dr. Roland L. DeLorme, Provost of Western Washington University and professor in Humanities in the Department of History, joined the faculty of Western Washington State College in 1966. Admission to Western on an “open door, rolling admissions” policy changed during President Ken Mortimer’s administration when the school moved to a “selective policy.” Dr. DeLorme discussed changes in student origination, how long students stayed, and what they studied while at Western. He described changes in technology and how he thought it would change the nature of classrooms. He also discussed the effectiveness of presidents Charles Fisher, James Jarrett and Jerry Flora at Western. Transcript of interview available.
1995 August 10
1/24 Diers, Carol interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr Carol Jean Diers, was an undergraduate at Western and eventually a full professor in the Psychology department. Dr. Diers attended kindergarten thru second grade at Western's Campus School. Later, she finished her last two years of college at Western. She returned to teach at Western in the 1960s during a hiring boom and remembered it as a very exciting time. In 1974, Dr. Diers served as Director of the Honors Program and became the first woman on the Honors Board. Since her retirement she occasionally gives talks at Western. This folder also contains copies of newspaper articles and announcements from Western. Transcript of interview available.
undated; 1996 July 1
1/25 Donker, Marjorie interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr. Marjorie Donker, professor in the English department, started her English degree at the University of Montana and finished it at Western. She was hired by Western after receiving her Ph.D. at the University of Washington. During her career at the college she acted as Director of the Composition program. As well as teaching she served on several committees such as the Commission for the Humanities, the College Committee on General requirements, and the Academic Steering Committee for the Educationally Disadvantaged. She also helped teach Women’s literature and feminist criticism. This folder includes copies of newspaper articles and announcements from Western. Transcript of interview available.
1996 June 28
2/1 Estrada, Larry interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Lawrence J. Estrada, Director of American Cultural Studies, came to Western in 1989 from Colorado State University. Ken Mortimer held the presidency at the time. Dr. Mortimer planned to make the University more diverse and wanted the region to see it as a top academic institution. Dr. Mortimer developed the Minority Community Advisory Committee and held forums with students and members of the community to ensure open discussions on local issues and concerns. Dr. Estrada credits President Mortimer for the rise in diversity at the University. Dr. Estrada said that President Karen Morse tries to uphold the foundational principles created by Dr. Mortimer. Transcript of interview available.
1999 January 19
2/2 Fleetwood, Hugh interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Hugh Fleetwood, Professor emeritus of Philosophy, joined Western's faculty in 1962 in the new Philosophy department. During this time Western moved from a teacher’s college to a four-year liberal arts college. This caused many changes, especially in the library – which lacked up-to-date books and journals and had many gaps in subject matter. After President Jarrett left Paul Woodring held the presidency for a year. Dr. Fleetwood remembered the establishment of Fairhaven College. In 1965, Harvey Bunke became president and created one hundred new faculty positions at Western. In 1967 Jerry Flora became president. Dr. Flora focused on having more contact with the surrounding community. In addition, Dr. Flora dealt with the student activism of the 1960s. Bill McDonald held the position of the dean of students at the time. Dr. Fleetwood remembered him as a very levelheaded man who had a good rapport with the students. During the cut backs in the late 1960s and early 1970s Dr Fleetwood sat on the Faculty Senate and on the Mischaikow committee, which recommended cuts and reductions at the University. In the 1970s, Paul Olscamp became president of Western. During his administration Western Washington College changed to Western Washington University. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 10
2/3 Flora, Charles "Jerry" interviewed by Don Eklund and Todd Welch
Dr. Charles J. Flora was President Emeritus of Western Washington State College, Professor Emeritus of Biology, former Academic Dean, and Director of the watershed at the Marine Laboratory at Shannon Point. Dr. Flora specialized in the study of coral reefs. He did not enjoy his administrative responsibilities because they kept him from focusing on academics. When he went back to teaching he and his students wrote a book on reefs called Bio-herm which was based on literature Dr. Flora had collected over the years. At the time of the interview Dr. Flora was in the process of revising the book to include his own observations of specific reefs. He also wrote a book called Normal College Knowledge, a collection of questions and recollections about Western. The book also contains stories of the tensions on campus in the 1960s. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 9
2/4 Flora, Charles "Jerry" interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Charles J. Flora is a Professor Emeritus of Biology and President Emeritus of Western Washington State College. He served as Western Washington University’s president from 1968 through 1975. Dr. Flora received his doctorate at the University of Florida in Gainesville and joined Western's faculty in 1957. He began as a professor in the department of Science. At that time one academic unit contained all of the sciences with Leona Sundquist as chair. While Western had some classes in sea life and the seashore, no marine program existed before Dr. Flora came. Dr. Flora remembered many of the leaders and people who made Western a quality institution. Some of these people included Ed Arntzen, Sam Buchanan, Leona Sundquist, Herb Taylor, Don Blood, President James Jarrett, Dr. Harvey Bunke, Reginald Butler (leader of the Ethnic Studies program), Alan Ross, Fred Sargent, Don Cole, Sam Kelly, Thad Spratlen, Chuck Harwood (first dean of Fairhaven), and Ron Williams (first dean of Ethnic Studies). Dr. Flora recalled the tensions on campus during the 1960s, and the fear that Western would become another Kent State. Dr. Flora also discussed the Board of Trustees and various faculty members. Transcript of interview available.
1999 August 18
2/5 Forrest, Marshall interviewed by Steve Inge
Judge Marshall Forrest, Trustee of Western Washington State College, and retired judge of the Washington State Court of Appeals, moved to Bellingham from Chicago after World War II. After he passed the bar he served as state representative for two years. When a vacancy opened on Western's Board of Trustees he asked for the appointment. Soon after joining the Board, Dr. William Haggard retired as president and Jim Jarrett was hired to replace him. Judge Forrest hoped that appointing Dr. Jarrett as president would be a first step toward expanding Western from a teacher's college to a liberal arts college. Judge Forrest remembered Dr. Paul Woodring, Dr. Jerry Flora, and Barney Goltz as very important to the development of Western. He also discussed the expansion of Western from the small Normal School to the larger contemporary campus. Judge Forrest also discussed the Campus School and the formation of Fairhaven College.Transcript of interview available.
2000 August 30
2/6 Francis, Richard interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Richard L. Francis, Professor Emeritus of English, came to Western in the fall of 1969 from Brown University. He was hired by Bob McDonnell, chair of the English department. During his first year he team-taught a course in film along with Arthur Hicks, Dick Feringer, and Dan Larner. Dr. Francis also worked with R.D. Brown who went on to write detective stories. Francis became involved, along with Gene Garber and Bob McDonnell, in putting together a committee to revise the curriculum in the English department. He also acted as liaison with the Wilson Library until his retirement. Dr Francis remembered President Jerry Flora fondly for his hospitality, his interest in the faculty and the way he handled student tensions during the Vietnam War. Dr. Paul Olscamp and Dr. Robert Ross succeeded Dr. Flora to the presidency. Dr. Francis felt that Dr. Olscamp best filled the presidency of the four men who held the position during his time at Western. Dr. Francis also worked with the Virginia Wright Fund for public art on campus. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 2
2/7 Froderberg, Al interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Albert John Froderberg, vice president for external affairs at Western Washington University. He joined Western's faculty in 1968 to teach in the Mathematics department. He eventually replaced Dr. Joe Hashisaki as chair of the department. Other important members of the department included George Witter, who helped form the Computer Science department and Harvey Gelder, one of the founding members of Fairhaven College. In 1985, President Robert Ross gave him the job of legislative liaison to the State Legislature in Olympia. In 1987, Dr. Froderberg became acting provost. In early November 1987 three of the college leaders, Bob Ross, the president, Don Cole, the vice president for business and Jeanene DeLille, the vice president for advancement, died in a plane crash. Dr. Froderberg became acting president until Ken Mortimer arrived in 1988. Dr. Mortimer made Dr. Froderberg vice president for external affairs and hired George Pierce as vice president for business and finance. Over his career at Western, Dr. Froderberg felt that all the presidents possessed their own strong points and he felt that Larry DeLorme and Jim Talbot made the biggest impact as provosts. Transcript of interview available.
1998 November 19
2/8 Gelder, Harvey interviewed by James Scott
Harvey M. Gelder, Professor Emeritus of Fairhaven College, joined the faculty of Western in the fall of 1948. Dr. William Haggard was president at this time and Professor Gelder remembered him fondly. He also remembered President James Jarrett in the same light. Professor Gelder felt Fairhaven College struggled under Dr. Harvey Bunke’s presidency due to a lack of adequate direction. Professor Gelder said that Jerry Flora was perfect as president during the late sixties and that Bill McDonald was excellent as dean of students at the time. Professor Gelder felt President Paul Olscamp alienated the press, the community, and most of the faculty. He also recalled that Fairhaven students usually did not thrive in the more traditional classes of North Campus.Transcript of interview available.
1993 May 13
2/9 Goltz, H.A. "Barney" interviewed by James Scott
Harold A. “Barney” Goltz, Director of Campus Planning at Western Washington University and Washington State Senator, was initially invited to Western Washington College of Education by Merle Kuder in 1957 in order to help plan the building of the new student union. The architects Binden and Jones originally drew up plans for the union, but after problems with that design President William Haggard hired Fred Basetti to work on the building. After the arrival of President James Jarrett, Goltz became his Administrative Assistant. He became the state legislative liaison for Western, the capital budget developer, and overseer for the expansion of the campus. Goltz remembered the visit of Vice-President Hubert Humphrey to Western in 1966. The Vice-President gave an award to the College for the design of the Ridgeway Complex. Goltz then talked about the addition of art to the campus and some of the architects and artists responsible such as Paul Thiry, Ibsen Nelson, George Bartholick, Nancy Holt, Richard Beyer and Isamu Noguchi. Goltz recalled the three changes in name that Western underwent during his time there. In the 1970s he took time off from the University in order to run for the State House of Representatives. He finished the interview by discussing the expansion of the university as well as talking about Sam Buchanan and Averell Harriman. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 13
2/10 Goltz, H.A. "Barney" interviewed by James Scott
Mr. Harold A. “Barney” Goltz, Director of Campus Planning at Western Washington University and Washington State Senator, came to Western in 1957 to plan the student union building. At that time, Governor Albert Rosellini mandated that Western Washington College of Education become a more comprehensive state college that would allow for considerable student growth. Architect George Bartholick was hired to plan the campus. Some elements in the plan included having public art throughout the campus, non-uniform buildings that blended with each other, facilities for small cluster colleges, and a pedestrian campus that allowed students to walk to any class in ten minutes. Unfortunately the overall plan underestimated the amount of space needed for vehicle parking. Aesthetics were an important part of Western’s building plan from the beginning, and the Ridgeway Dorms won an award for the best dormitories built in the United States during 1966. Vice President Hubert Humphrey presented the award in Washington, D.C. and then came to Bellingham to present it personally at the Carver Gym. Transcript of interview available.
1999 April 1; 1999 April 3
2/11 Gregory, William interviewed by James Scott
Dr. William A. Gregory; dean of the College of Fine & Performing Arts and Professor Emeritus of Theater/Dance, arrived at Western in 1957 and left in 1959. He spent five years in Detroit at the Vanguard Theater. He returned to Western in 1969. Dr. Gregory discussed the separation of Drama from the Speech Department and the eventual development of the College of Fine & Performing Arts. He discussed his appreciation for Paul Olscamp during his presidency at Western. Dr. Gregory recalled the move to form an interdisciplinary program of art, music, and theater, which disappeared after his retirement. He described his involvement with the outdoor sculpture collection, giving credit to Larry Hanson and Harold “Barney” Goltz. He also discussed the lack of financial support from the Washington Commission on the Arts for Western's outdoor sculpture collection. Dr. Gregory stated that the States Arts Commission, the National Foundation of the Arts, and the National Foundation of the Humanities did contribute significantly to the collection. Transcript of interview available.
1993 May 18
2/12 Gregory, William interviewed by James Scott
Dr. William A. Gregory; dean, College of Fine & Performing Arts and Professor Emeritus of Theater/Dance came to Western in the fall of 1957 but left in 1959 to pursue other professional activities. He returned in 1969 to become the director of the Theater department. In 1973 President Jerry Flora asked Gregory to begin research into forming a separate college. In 1975 he helped form the College of Fine & Performing Arts. Dr. Gregory retired in 1987. The interview went on to discuss people influential in the arts. He spoke highly of President Paul Olscamp and his strong support for the arts. He discussed the remodeling and additions to the concert hall, art gallery, and L-1 (in Old Main). Dr. Gregory gave credit to Phil Ager for his work on the concert hall. Two short-lived programs that Dr. Gregory took great pride in were the Interdisciplinary Arts program and the Study Abroad program both of which disappeared upon the arrival of his successor. He also acknowledged individuals he believed influenced campus culture and his career such as Arthur Hicks, Albert Van Aver, Mary Terey-Smith, Pat McCormick, Tom Schlotterback, and Dr. Lawrence Brewster. Transcript of interview available.
1999 June 22
2/13 Haeske, Carroll interviewed by Al Froderberg
Carrol Haeske, Western Washington University Alumnus, attended the Normal School in Bellingham in 1920. He worked in the afternoons and took classes in the mornings. In 1922 the students elected him the Student Body President. During his presidency he brought about the purchase of the Lakewood property on Lake Whatcom. Haeske left the Normal School in 1923 and eventually graduated from the University of Washington. He then went on to Stanford. Haeske taught music and English at various high schools. He retired in 1966 from Wilson High School in Los Angeles, CA. Haeske remembered Victor Hoppe, drama coach and director of the Normal School. During the summer session while back from Stanford, Haeske acted for Hoppe in a production of the Merchant of Venice. He also related information about the personal life of John Steinbeck, who was a student at Stanford with Haeske. While at the Normal School he taught fencing. Other activities he remembered while in Bellingham included the race up Mt. Baker and the Tulip Festival. He also discussed his teachers at the Normal school including Charles Fisher, Kibbe, Nora Bayes, and Dr. Elias A. Bond. Transcript of interview available.
1998 April 8
2/14 Harris, Richard interviewed by James Scott
Richard Harris, Director of Continuing Education and Conference services, transferred to Western in 1956 and received his Bachelor's degree. After teaching for 3 years he returned to Western to get a master’s degree in school psychology. He returned to Western again in 1987, this time as an administrator. When he was a student Dr. William Haggard was president. Harris remembered Dr. Haggard’s relationship with students and faculty. He discussed Bill McDonald, Dean of Men, and his 'in loco parentis' role. When President James Jarrett arrived the University changed from a teaching school to a comprehensive state college. Harris described the shift in faculty from Educational teachers to researchers and scholars. He related the sense of tension that this transition brought. Harris retired as an administrator at Western in 1989. He discussed the library during his time as both a student and an administrator. He also discussed the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Harris talked about faculty members that influenced him including Arthur Hicks, Ed Arntzen, and Keith Murray. Harris then described his return to Western under the presidency of Dr. Robert Ross. He discussed the plane crash that took the lives of President Ross, Jeanine DeLille, and Don Kohl in October of 1987 as well as the University's response to that loss. Harris then discussed his pursuits since leaving the University in 1989. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 4
2/15 Hearsey, Herbert interviewed by Lynne Masland
Herbert R. Hearsey was a Reference Librarian, Associate Professor of Library Science and Associate Director of Wilson Library. After receiving a Bachelor's degree from Tufts and a Master’s degree from Harvard and Tufts, Mr. Hearsey received a library degree from the University of Illinois. Mr. Hearsey spent many years working in libraries including those at Harvard and the University of Illinois. He then came to Western in 1941 during President William Haggard’s administration. Upon arrival a local woman informed him of President Charles Fisher’s supposed communist activities. A brief discussion of the KKK and its local grand wizard Planten Luther ensued. The discussion then turned to Mabel Zoe Wilson, Western’s librarian at the time. Mr. Hearsey discussed his work with the reference library, the summer program, and the recreation committee. Mr. Hearsey then described Wilson’s retirement and her replacement, Mildred Herrick. He reminisced about World War II and the lack of students on campus. He spoke in detail on the difficulties of Mildred Herrick’s years at the library. He discussed the changes that came with James Jarrett's presidency. Mr. Hearsey also discussed his long career on the athletic committee. After Herrick left, Western hired Howard McGaw as the new librarian. Mr. Hearsey talked about President Jerry Flora's contributions to the library which included appointing Bob Lawyer as Library Director. Transcript of interview available.
1996 August 30
2/16 Hicks, Arthur interviewed by Don Eklund and Mike Runestrand
Dr. Arthur C. Hicks, Chair and professor of Humanities, reminisced about his hometown and early educational opportunities. He came to the Normal School under President Charles Fisher in 1933. He was the first chairman of the newly created Humanities department. Dr. Hicks discussed the varying student motivations for seeking a higher education. He also talked about the value of a General Education as opposed to fulfilling General University Requirements. He discussed the use of loyalty oaths from the 1920s thru the 1950s and the dismissal of President Fisher by Governor Charles Martin. Dr. Hicks brought up McCarthyism and described Senator Joseph McCarthy's visit to Bellingham in the early 1950s. Hicks gave an anti-McCarthy speech to the Rotary Club which moved the members to invite the notorious red-baiter Albert S. Canwell to speak. Dr. Hicks discussed the value of the American Association of University Professors in ensuring the rights and benefits of educators. Transcript only
1975 March 6
2/17 Hiraoka, Jesse interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Jesse Hiraoka, Dean of the College of Ethnic Studies, founder of the Human Services program, and professor of French, began his career at California State College in San Bernardino. He finally came to Western in 1972/1973. Hiraoka discussed the problems he faced trying to establish the College of Ethnic Studies. He then explained how the human services program became part of the College of Ethnic Studies. He appreciated the strong support of people like President Jerry Flora. Under President Paul Olscamp Ethnic Studies was down-graded from a college to a program. Hiraoka left Human Services in 1981 and at that time the Education department took over its management. He went on to chair the Foreign Language department. He also helped develop The Journal of Ethnic Studies.Transcript of interview available.
2000 May 30
2/18 Hitchman, Jim interviewed by James Scott
James H. Hitchman, Professor of History and former Dean of Students, came to Western in 1966 as Assistant Academic Dean before becoming Dean of Students in 1967. He remembered the change in administration from President Harvey Bunke to Dr. Jerry Flora. He also recalled President Bunke encouraging him to let go of campus architect, George Bartholick. Hitchman recalled being a member of the exclusive “six-pack” under President Flora. He discussed student turmoil and protests during the 1960s. In 1969, Hitchman left his job as dean of students and moved to the History Department. He also discussed the changes in the student body that occurred due to conflict over the Vietnam War. Transcript of interview available.
1993 May 23
3/1 Steve Inge interviewed by James Scott
Steve W. Inge, Western Administrator and part of the Western Foundation, graduated from Western in 1966 and returned in 1968 as the Director of Alumni Relations. He discussed his time as an undergraduate during President James Jarrett’s administration and the change from Normal School to liberal arts institution. He recounted stories of faculty members such as Herb Taylor, Jim Mackary, and Arthur Hicks. He remembered his time as an administrator in the Alumni office and speeches given by President Flora throughout the state. He talked about changes in the alumni programs. He then discussed problems with the Western Foundation. He moved to the Publications office for a short time. He eventually took a position in the Development Office. Transcript of interview available.
1993 July 6
3/2 Jarrett, James interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. James L. Jarrett, president of Western from 1959 to 1964 and Professor Emeritus of Education at University of California, Berkley, came to Bellingham in 1959 to assume the presidency of the College. He discussed the Board of Trustees and the division within the faculty regarding change. Dr. Jarrett talked about the difference between himself and his predecessor, Dr. William Haggard. He also discussed the changes he wanted to implement at Western. He talked about the role of Barney Goltz in his administration. Dr. Jarrett claimed that his most important job as president was in recruiting faculty. During his presidency, Dr. Jarrett spent time lecturing and talking about Western to various organizations. He discussed the creation of the Faculty Council. He remembered his involvement in establishing the Humanities program. He recalled bringing back Paul Woodring. He also discussed his family's move from Bellingham to California. Transcript of interview available.
1999 May 3
3/3 Sam Kelly interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Samuel P. Kelly, Professor Emeritus of Education, former Graduate Dean and former Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs, was born and raised in Bellingham. He attended Western in the 1940s on the G.I. Bill. In 1965, he returned to the College to teach in the Education department. Dr. Kelly related anecdotes of President William Haggard. He discussed the changes in faculty and the school during its transformation from teachers college to liberal arts college. He also talked about the disintegration of the Humanities program and the loss of the "General Education" focus, which in turn led to an over-abundance of elective courses. He compared administrative and faculty functions from the 1950s to those of the present. Dr. Kelly talked about the increased student body and the effect it had on faculty/student relations. He reminisced about people at Western such as Keith Murray, Herb Taylor, Jerry Flora and Jim Jarrett. He also discussed the relative strengths of the Presidents he knew. Transcript of interview available.
1993 July 7
3/4 Kelsey, Ruth interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Ruth Kelsey was a faculty member of Western from 1948 to 1972 in the Art Department. She discussed her early teaching experiences in eastern Washington. She also discussed her involvement with the Works Progress Administration Arts Project. She attended Washington State University, studying under Clifford Still and Glenn Wessels. She then attended Berkeley for her Master's degree, studying under Henry Schaeffer-Simmern. Kelsey received a traveling fellowship to Guatemala and Mexico after World War II where she studied Pre-Columbian art. She was hired by President William Haggard to teach eighth grade art at the Campus school. She was surprised by the other art teacher's opposition to her as well as a lack of facilities and supplies. She discussed the lack of support for her own artistic endeavors by the Art department and her success in the Seattle art community. Kelsey talked about the physical changes on campus and how she transitioned from teaching children to teaching teachers. She also discussed her involvement with the Bellingham art community. Transcript of interview available.
1995 October 31; 1995 November 16
3/5 Knapman, Fred interviewed by Don Eklund and Todd Welch
Dr. Fred W. Knapman, Professor of Chemistry, Department Chair and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, discussed his upbringing in Lethbridge, Alberta as well as teaching in small country schools. He enrolled at the Bellingham State Normal School in 1931 and remembered H.C. Philippi, E.A. Bond, Ed Arntzen and Leona Sundquist. He also discussed the dismissal of President Charles Fisher by the Board of Trustees. Dr. Knapman was hired in 1942 as a chemistry teacher at the College. He was on the Long Range Planning Committee and worked for a new science building. He recalled Nobel Prize winner Dr. Linus Pauling speaking at the dedication of Haggard Hall. Dr. Knapman received a National Science Foundation Fellowship in 1959 and studied at the University of Washington and the University of London. He discussed the formation of Fairhaven College and the loss of its first Dean, Chuck Harwood. He also discussed the reduction in force (R.I.F.) of the early 1970s and how it was dealt with by the department chairs. He talked about the Canwell Committee of the 1950s and its pursuit of Communists at Washington's state schools. Dr. Knapman also discussed his years of world travel after retirement in 1974 and his participation in the Elderhostel program. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 8
3/6 Lowe, Florence interviewed by Keith Murray, James Scott, and Jim Moore
Florence M. Lowe was a student at the Bellingham Normal School in the 1930s. Florence Lowe discussed her early education and her work on a book about the Equality Colony of Blanchard, WA. She talked about Blancard as it existed in her youth. She also reminisced about Edward R. Murrow who came from her town. Mrs. Lowe talked about many early childhood memories in and around Blanchard. She remembered taking the Inter-urban trolley to Bellingham to shop. She attended the Normal School in the early '30s and remembered Leona Sundquist, Dr. Upshaw, Dr. Masters, President Charles Fisher, Mabel Zoe Wilson, Nora Cummings, Georgia Gregg, Ed Arntzen, Sam Carver, Paul Woodring and many of her favorite teachers. She discussed the controversy surrounding Dr. Fisher's presidency and the hostility of Frank Seifert of the Bellingham Herald and the Committee on Normal Protest. Mrs. Lowe talked about the attempted formation of a communist group by students in the 1930s. She also recalled a number of student organizations such as the Student Council, the Relations Club and the Scholarship Society. She then discussed downtown Bellingham in the 1930s and the many businesses of the time, including the Grand Theatre, the American Theatre, Wahl's Department Store, the Montegue Store, the B.B. Furniture Company, the Bellingham Bay Improvement Company, and the Pacific American Fisheries. The discussion returned to Edward R. Murrow and his beginnings in Blanchard, WA. Transcript of interview available.
1988 August 26; 1988 August 29
3/7 Mason, David interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. David T. Mason, Professor Emeritus of Fairhaven, discussed his mother's competitive friendship with Leona Sundquist. He also discussed his involvement in the planning stages of Fairhaven College and people associated with it, such as Paul Woodring and Chuck Harwood. He talked about quantitative biology and its application to the study of life on Earth. Dr. Mason also described his research on the effects of mercury in natural bodies of water. He discussed marijuana and LSD use on campus in the 1960s. Dr. Mason also discussed his part in the Gilbert and Sullivan productions at Fairhaven. He spoke about various Deans of Fairhaven, such as Phil Ager, Marie Eaton, Joe Bettis, and Ron Riggins. He then discussed the continuing vigor of Fairhaven College. Transcript of interview available.
2000 July 5
3/8 Mason, Evelyn interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Evelyn P. Mason, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, came to the Pacific Northwest in 1959 from the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University in St. Louis. She was the first professional woman to come to Bellingham. She was eventually hired at Western to teach a Child Development course during Dr. James Jarrett's presidency. Dr. Mason discussed the Psychology department and campus changes in the 1960s. She also described her role in the development of the degree program in Psychology. She discussed many individuals associated with the College, such as Dr. Jarrett, Marshall Forrest, Barney Goltz, Paul Woodring, Harvey Bunke, Keith Murray, Howard Critchfield, Jerry Flora, Herb Taylor and Jim McAree. Dr. Mason also discussed the ability of President Jerry Flora and Dean Bill McDonald to maintain peace on campus during the late 1960s. She discussed the Humanities program in the 1960s. She talked about Fairhaven College and her experience of teaching courses there. She spoke about the early 1970s reduction in force (R.I.F.) and its effect on the Psychology department and campus in general. Dr. Mason discussed the presidency of Paul Olscamp. She eventually became Director of Project Catchup. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 16
3/9 Mayer, Erwin interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Erwin S. Mayer, Professor Emeritus of Economics, joined Western's faculty in 1953 in the Social Studies department. The department was then chaired by Ed Arntzen. He described the division of departments during President James Jarrett's administration in the early 1960s as well as faculty impressions of the new president. He also described the movement of departments from Old Main during the late 1960s as it was being refurbished. Dr. Mayer discussed the formation of the College of Business and Economics and the naming of Parks Hall. He also discussed the change in committee effectiveness from the 1950s to the 1980s and the changing complexity of the Administration. He talked about the merits of Bill O'Neal as an administrator. He described struggling with a miniscule library collection in the 1950s. Dr. Mayer also discussed the potential for the development of Ph.D. programs at Western. He then talked about presidents Robert Ross and Paul Olscamp. Transcript of interview available.
1993 February 16
3/10 McInnis, Ray interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Ray McInnis, Wilson Library Reference Department, was hired by Library Director Howard McGaw in 1965. He described the miniscule budget of the library and the lack of research materials available. He talked about President Jerry Flora who poured money into the library and which made the collection grow exponentially. Dr. McInnis talked about his role in developing the Reference Research Collection. He also talked about the growth of the Inter-library Loan System. He described his involvement in classroom teaching. Dr. McInnis discussed relations between the library and presidents Harvey Bunke, Jerry Flora, Paul Olscamp, Robert Ross and Ken Mortimer. He also discussed the effectiveness of various library Directors. He talked about his own publication history. He also discussed his belief that students should be taught how to learn as opposed to what to learn. Transcript of interview available.
1993 June 22
3/11 Mischaikow, Michael interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Michael Mischaikow, Professor Emeritus of Economics, talked about his education in Bulgaria and Austria before and during World War II. He joined Western's faculty in 1964 during interim President Paul Woodring's administration . He discussed the differences in the administrations of Harvey Bunke, Jerry Flora and Paul Olscamp. Dr. Mischaikow described Vietnam and student draft exemptions as being causes for the 1960s student unrest. He also discussed the chaos students brought to classrooms and campus during this period. He talked about his involvement with the United Nations Resettlement and Repatriation Agency. He also discussed Communism in Europe after World War II. Dr. Mischaikow described his dissertation work at West Virginia University and explained why he came to Western. He calculated the amount of money Western generated per day for Bellingham's economy as well as becoming environmentally active in the region. Dr. Mischaikow became Dean of Huxley College in order to stave off its collapse. He also described how he became involved with the Western Regional Science Association. He discussed the Mischaikow Committee during the reduction in force (R.I.F.) which was responsible for determining faculty cuts. He also talked about receiving the Excellency in Teaching award in 1984. Transcript of interview available.
1993 May 14
3/12 Mitchell, Howard interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Howard Mitchell, Professor Emeritus of Economics, joined the faculty of Western in 1955 during President William Haggard's administration. He discussed the differences in faculty interactions since the 1950s. He also discussed the library before its collection was expanded. He talked about the faculty response to President James Jarrett. Dr. Mitchell discussed the General Education Program as well as President Harvey Bunke. He also talked about administrators being sent instead of faculty to the State Legislature to appropriate funding. He described the division of departments into specific disciplines. Dr. Mitchell talked about the development of research requirements for faculty tenure. He discussed Fairhaven College and its departure from the vision of Paul Woodring as well as its near destruction in the 1970s. Dr. Mitchell eventually became Chair of the Department of Economics. He talked about program growth and various presidential administrations. He described a lack of focus in the School of Education as compared to the Normal School. He also discussed the lack of educational preparedness in incoming students. Transcript of interview available.
1993 June 17
3/13 Monahan, Robert interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Robert Monahan, Professor of Geography and Director of International Studies, joined Western's faculty in 1955 to teach Geography in the Social Studies department. He discussed President William Haggard's faculty dinners as well as the library before its collection was expanded. He also described the structure of Dr. Haggard's administration as well as the faculty at the time. He discussed the changes wrought by Dr. James Jarrett's administration. Dr. Monahan described the effectiveness of Paul Woodring as interim president. He talked about President Jerry Flora's ability to diffuse violence and allow freedom of expression during the late 1960s as well as his contributions to the library and his support for cluster colleges. Dr. Monahan described the loss of the College of Ethnic Studies to budget cuts. He discussed the histories of Fairhaven College and Huxley College. He also discussed the history of the Geography department. Dr. Monahan talked about the Canadian Studies program as well as the strengths of the seven presidents he worked under. He also discussed Ed Arntzen and Arthur Hicks. Transcript of interview available.
1993 July 16
3/14 Monahan, Robert interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Robert L. Monahan, Professor of Geography and Director of International Studies, described why he came to Western and his impressions of Sam Buchanan and President William Haggard. He discussed the arrival of President James Jarrett and his use of the Great Books program. Dr. Monahan described the changes on campus after Dr. Haggard left. He discussed the breakup of the Social Studies department. He also discussed presidents Harvey Bunke and Jerry Flora and the turbulence of the late 1960s. He talked about Provost Fred Sargent. Dr. Monahan discussed the reduction in force (R.I.F.) of the early 1970s and its lasting effects. He talked about President Robert Ross and Provost Jim Talbot. He also talked about Fairhaven College, Huxley College and the College of Ethnic Studies. He described the grim financial circumstances of the early 1970s. He discussed individuals such as Lucy Kangley, Arthur Hicks, Moyle Cederstrom, Albert Van Aver, Leona Sundquist and Ed Arntzen. Dr. Monahan described the pool incident involving Herb Taylor. He talked about the Campus School, Old Main and Arntzen Hall. He also talked about librarian Mildred Herrick and the lack of materials in the library. He finished with anecdotes of Jerry Flora. Transcript of interview available.
1999 June 22
3/15 Murray, Keith interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Keith Murray, Professor of History, was hired by President William Haggard in 1946 to teach History. He described his impressions of the campus and Bellingham upon arriving. He discussed Western in the 1940s. He talked about President Charles Fisher and the events surrounding his termination. He also discussed Arthur Hicks' involvement in those events. Dr. Murray described his introduction to Dr. William Haggard. He discussed Paul Woodring's publications. He also discussed the choice of Dr. James Jarrett for president and the change it brought to the school. Dr. Murray talked about the increased enrollment in the 1950s. He described his part in the formation of the Humanities program. He also discussed the teaching load he maintained while simultaneously writing. Transcript of interview available.
1993 February 18
3/16 Olscamp, Paul S. interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Paul Olscamp, President of Western Washington University and Professor of Philosophy, discussed what brought him to Western. He talked about the change of the school's name from Western Washington State College to Western Washington University. He also talked about the Council for Post-Secondary Education. Dr. Olscamp described the Program Study Committee during the second reduction in force (R.I.F.). The Excellency in Teaching Award was initiated during his administration. He discussed the formation of the School of Education, the College of Fine and Performing Arts, the College of Business and Economics as well as various departmental divisions. The Board of Trustees Handbook was created under his presidency and the Annual Report System was also initiated. Dr. Olscamp re-named the Western Foundation and broke the University Senate into four parts. He discussed the initiation of a Capital Budget for the University. He also discussed the South Fields Project. Dr. Olscamp talked about instituting Student Evaluations in 1980. He reminisced about Bill McDonald, Herb Taylor, Bill Gregory, Ritajean Butterworth, Ark Chin, Barney Goltz and Jim Talbot. He discussed the murder of two Western students by the Hillside Strangler as well as the murder of Bob Schlewitz in the Viking Union. Dr. Olscamp talked about collective bargaining for faculty and the reciprocal tuition arrangements with British Columbia. He also discussed his Canadian roots. Transcript of interview available.
1998 December 4
3/17 O'Neil, Bill interviewed by James Scott
Bill O'Neil, Registrar and Vice Provost for Academic Administration, attended Western as a student in 1939. After being drafted into the Army during the Second World War, he pursued a master’s degree elsewhere during the years 1954-1955. Two years later, he returned to Western and became the admissions officer, then the Registar in 1962. Bill described the construction of some of the buildings on campus including Haggard and Bond Hall. He also recounted other changes that the university underwent during the 1950s and 1960s including academic, social, and administrative. He discussed enrollment, the minimum grade point average, past presidents, budget and personnel cutbacks, as well as the Vietnam War and student demonstrations. O’Neil mentioned the progression Western’s presidents, administrators, professors as well as their policies and methods of handling affairs. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 9
3/18 O'Neil, Bill and Goltz, H.A. Barney interviewed by James Scott
Bill O'Neil was Registrar and Vice Provost for Academic Administration and H.A. 'Barney' Goltz was a State Senator and Campus Planner. Bill O'Neil came to Western as a student in 1939. He discussed the treatment of President Charles Fisher by local media and his eventual ousting. He also discussed the Red Scare of the 1950s. He talked about the town/gown relationship between Western and Bellingham. O'Neil discussed planning for University outreach and how it changed over the years. He also discussed Dr. Arthur Hicks' stage production of Shelley's "The Cenci" in 1940. He talked about Merle Kuder. O'Neil discussed the change in student population and how it effected administrative and faculty function. Barney Goltz described how he was hired by Merle Kuder. They discussed the purchase of the Lakewood property. They also discussed the change in administrative function in relation to students since Dr. William Haggard's presidency. They talked about the exponential growth of administrative posts as compared to that of the faculty and students. They also discussed the lengthy amount of time it takes to make a decision within the bureaucratic hierarchy of the University. They finished with a discussion of campus expansion. Transcript of interview available.
1993 March 9
3/19 Opening of Goltz-Murray State Archives Building at Western Washington University
This is an audio recording of the dedication ceremony of the Goltz-Murray State Archives Building at Western Washington University. Secretary of State Ralph Munro presided over the dedication. President Karen Morse recognized the Board of Trustees of Western and discussed the development of the concept for a regional archives building on the campus. Mary Kay Becker, chairwoman of the Board of Trustees, discussed the importance of an archives to the community. She also thanked Dr. Keith Murray and Senator Barney Goltz for their contributions to the community. Sid McAlpin, State Archivist, discussed the historical placement of state archives around Washington and recognized the Regional State Archivists for their work. Jim Moore, the Western Region State Archivist, recognized all those who worked on organizing and constructing the new archives building. Dr. Bert Rhoads, former Archivist of the United States, Professor of History, and Director of the Graduate Program in Archives Administration and Records Management, recognized Secretary of State Munro for his work on the building of the archives. He described what archives are and how they function in society. He also recognized the work of Dr. James Scott. Secretary of State Munro and Jim Moore read a declaration of recognition of the honorees, Dr. Keith Murray and Senator Barney Goltz. Secretary of State Munro also read the plaque honoring Dr. Murray and Senator Goltz which would be placed at the entrance to the archives building. He also discussed why those particular men were chosen to have their names on the building. Senator Goltz and Dr. Murray then gave thank you statements. Closing remarks were made by Secretary of State Munro and President Morse. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 5
3/20 Past Presidents (Harvey Bunke, Charles Flora, James L. Jarrett, Paul Olscamp) interviewed by James Scott and Don Eklund
Four Former Presidents of Western Washington University: Dr. James L. Jarrett, Dr. Harvey C. Bunke, Dr. Charles J. “Jerry” Flora, and Dr. Paul J. Olscamp were interviewed. The interview began with Dr. James Jarrett relating his personal history. He discussed his mission to liberalize Western during his presidency and the beginning of the Humanities Program. He also discussed the university name change and gaining the right to grant Bachelor's degrees.. Then Dr. Harvey Bunke told his personal history. He remembered the turmoil that surrounded his presidency. Dr. Bunke also discussed the addition of new programs and colleges such as Fairhaven College. Dr. Jerry Flora then told his personal history. Dr. Flora came to Western as a Biology professor and served under all of the other three presidents. Dr. Paul Olscamp also discussed his personal history. He arrived at Western in 1975 with ideas to increase fundraising and to create a separate College of Education. He also talked about the name change from Western Washington State College to Western Washington University. The four presidents then discussed the relationships they had with the Board of Trustees. Dr. Flora recalled the problems of the 1970s including cutbacks and student activism. They discussed the changing emphasis on teaching and research. The men then discussed collective bargaining for the faculty. They also discussed collegiality. The four presidents commented on what makes a good administrator. The discussion ended with Dr. Flora discussing the marine laboratory at Shannon Point. Transcript of interview available.
February 24, 1993
3/21 Paulus, Ingeberg interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr. Ingeberg Paulus, Associate Professor Emeritus of Sociology, described the personal and professional paths that led her to Western. She discussed studying at the University of London. She talked about her youth in post-war Germany and how she got to Canada. Dr. Paulus discussed her interest in and experience with gender issues. She also discussed her research on border smuggling. She talked about her perceptions of students over her twenty year career at Western. She also talked about her interests and activities after retirement. Dr. Paulus discussed the collegial climate at Western as well as the reduction in force (R.I.F.) in the early 1970s. She discussed the cultural offerings of Western and Bellingham. She also talked about criminology, the Equal Rights Amendment and what made her retire. The folder also contains newspaper articles and other documents relating to Dr. Paulus’ years at Western. Transcript of interview available.
undated; 1996 July 10
4/1 Ramsland, Dorothy interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Dorothy Ramsland, Professor Emeritus and Chair of Home Economics, joined the faculty of Western in 1949 to teach Home Economics during President William Haggard's administration. She talked about the early staff. She also talked about the older faculty's positive treatment of new faculty. She discussed faculty women and their accomplishments. She talked about the Faculty Forum. She also discussed President James Jarrett, the Great Books program and the changes wrought by his administration. Dr. Ramsland told anecdotes about Dr. Jarrett. She talked about President Harvey Bunke and the attempt to discontinue Home Economics. She told anecdotes about President Jerry Flora and discussed town and gown relations between Western and Bellingham. Dr. Ramsland discussed President Paul Olscamp, Ralph Thompson, Jim Davis and President Robert Ross. She also discussed various president's "open-door" policy for faculty. She talked about the lack of books at the library as well as librarians Mabel Zoe Wilson and Mildred Herrick. She discussed the campus sculpture collection. Dr. Ramsland talked about the Capital Nomenclature Committee. She also discussed Sam Buchanan as well as the reasons she remained at Western.Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 9
4/2 Ramsland, Dorothy interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Dr. Dorothy Ramsland, Professor Emeritus and Chair of Home Economics, discussed her interactions with students during her career as well as the success of various graduates. She described the changes in students over the four decades she worked at Western. She also described the changes in the Home Economics field. Dr. Ramsland talked about being a female administrator on a male-dominated campus. She discussed her department's use of space and their successes over the years. She described the culture of women faculty on campus. Dr. Ramsland discussed her decision to get her Ph.D. as well as the costs of pursuing a demanding career. Transcript of interview available.
1996 July 29
4/3 Rhoads, James interviewed by Todd Welsh
Dr. James Rhoads, former Archivist of the United States, Professor of History, and Director of the Graduate Program in Archives Administration and Records Management, discussed his education and how he found a job at the National Archives in Washington, D.C. He became the Archivist of the United States in 1968. He discussed many projects that he worked on during that time. He discussed the creation of the Archives/Records Management program at Western. He talked about Dr. Paul Kohl and what he brought to the program. Dr. Rhoads discussed his short-term appointment to teach the program after Dr. Kohl's death and how that became a permanent appointment. He discussed modifications to and the expansion of classes in the program. He also discussed various alumni. He talked about the Centennial Committee and the Founders Day Committee. He also talked about his plans for retirement. Transcript of interview available.
1993 June 25
4/4 Robinson, Mary interviewed by James Scott
Mary R. Robinson, Senior Administrator and Vice Provost, came to Western in 1969 after nine years at American University of Beirut. She discussed the student disturbances on campus when she started at Western. She discussed Dean Bill McDonald and the transition from the policy of 'in loco parentis'. She talked about the beginnings of Affirmative Action in the early 1970s. Robinson became Associate Dean of Students and Affirmative Action Officer in 1972. She discussed Jerry Flora, Paul Olscamp, Jim Talbot and the growth of the administration over time. She also discussed the growth of women administrators at Western. She talked about Affirmative Action and the additions of female faculty. Robinson discussed the attributes of presidents Jerry Flora, Paul Olscamp, Robert Ross and Ken Mortimer. She also discussed Ruth Platt, Leona Sundquist, Bill McDonald and Jim Talbot.Transcript of interview available.
1993 July 28
4/5 Robinson, Mary interviewed by Kathryn Anderson
Mary R. Robinson, Senior Administrator and Vice Provost, talked about the creation of daycare services for students with children. She also talked about the attempt to academically broaden the Child Development Center. She discussed Women's Studies and the acceptance of Affirmative Action on campus. She also discussed Affirmative Action and dealing with Native American students. Robinson described the changes in students since she began working at Western. She discussed Title IX and Women's sports. She also discussed the addition of women to the staff and how the resistance of men has changed. She finished by talking about her retirement. Transcript of interview available.
1996 July 23
4/6 Ross, J. Alan interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Alan Ross, Professor Emeritus and Dean of Graduate School, came to Western as a student in 1929 and returned as a teacher after World War II. He discussed the Campus School and building locations in the 1940s. He discussed President William Haggard and the campus transformation under President James Jarrett. He also discussed the termination of the Curriculum Committee. Dr. Ross described Western's link to the State Legislature. He also described his place in Jerry Flora's administration. He discussed his part in obtaining the right to grant doctoral degrees. He talked about the cluster colleges of Fairhaven, Huxley and the College of Ethnic Studies. He also talked about the College of Business and Economics and the College of Fine and Performing Arts. Dr. Ross discussed the expansion of the University and the administration. He also discussed Barney Goltz, Dr. James Jarrett, Dr. Jerry Flora and Dr. Paul Olscamp. Transcript of interview available.
1993 May 6
4/7 Ross, J. Alan interviewed by Lynne Masland
Dr. Alan Ross, Professor Emeritus and Dean of Graduate School, discussed his early upbringing along the Stilliguamish River as well as in Whatcom County. He discussed working on steamers bound for Alaska and attending the Normal School. He talked about Ed Arntzen and Lucy Kangley. He also talked about his educational path at the University of Chicago and Yale. Dr. Ross discussed his work in the Navy during World War II. He also discussed his two sons. He talked about President William Haggard. He described his work with the National Council on the Accreditation of Teachers and Administrators and the Northwest Association of Secondary and Higher Schools. He also talked about the University receiving the right to grant doctoral degrees but not using it. Folder includes biographical materials. Transcript of interview available.
1995 August 29
4/8 Scott, James interviewed by James Hitchman
Dr. James Scott, Professor Emeritus and Chair of Geography, Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies discussed his family and early life in England. He described attending St. Catharine's College in Cambridge as well as the educational system in England. Dr. Scott took teaching positions in Argentina, Canada and finally Indiana. He joined Western's faculty in 1966. He discussed the impetus for organizing the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. He also discussed the Center's activities and publications. He described his association with the Washington State Centennial Commission. He also described his work on publishing a Washington State atlas. Dr. Scott talked about being Chair of the Geography department. He also talked about the incorporation of the Geography department into Huxley College. He discussed what he expects from students as well as the quality of Western as a teaching institution. Transcript of interview available.
1993 August 28
4/9 Scott, James and Delorme, R.L. interviewed by Haynes Fay for the KGMI Impact Program.
Dr. James Scott, Professor Emeritus and Chair of Geography, Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies and Dr. Roland L. DeLorme, Provost of Western Washington University, professor in Humanities in the Department of History. Dr. Scott and Dr. DeLorme were on the show to discuss the publication of their Historical Atlas of Washington. They discussed the origination of the idea for the atlas in the early 1970s and the long road to its publication in 1988. They discussed Dr. DeLorme's involvement with the project. They talked about the book's potential use in the classroom. They also talked about various topics covered in the atlas. They discussed the University of Oklahoma Press which published their book. Dr. Scott and Dr. DeLorme discussed their research for the atlas. They also discussed Ray McInnis and Nancy Pryor. Dr. Scott discussed the future publication of the Centennial Atlas of Washington. They talked about the boundary formulations for Whatcom County. They also answered questions from various callers. Transcript of interview available
1988
4/10 Skeen, Bearnice interviewed by Lynne Masland
Dr. Bearnice Skeen, Professor Emeritus of Education, Director of the Campus School, and Co-chair of the Department of Education, discussed being Co-chair of the Education department. She also discussed Dr. Raymond Hawk whom she assisted at the Campus School. She talked about her youth in Nebraska and Portland, Oregon. Dr. Skeen discussed her brother, Earle Stewart. She discussed coming to Western in 1947. She also discussed the women who worked on campus such as Florence Kirkpatrick, Leona Sundquist, Evelyn Odom, Mira Booth, Lucy Kangley and Synva Nichol. She talked about the Campus School and various teachers. She also talked about Ralph Thompson, Lucille Barron and Lorraine Powers. Dr. Skeen described where she lived in Bellingham as well as faculty relations with the town. She talked about the loss of the Campus School. She discussed her faculty tea parties. She also discussed the changes in student backgrounds over the years. She remembered people such as Sam Kelly, Marie Pabst, Dr. E.A. Bond, Dr. Freehill, Merle Kuder, Dorothy Ramsland, Ruby McInnis and Mabel "Hodgie" Hodges. Dr. Skeen talked about her trip around the world in 84 days. Transcript of interview available.
1996 January 4
4/11 Skeen, Bearnice interviewed by Lynne Masland
Dr. Bearnice Skeen, Professor Emeritus of Education, Director of the Campus School, Co-chair of the Department of Education. Dr. Skeen discussed Arthur Hicks. She talked about various people and buildings. She discussed Dr. Haggard and Marge Kingsley. She also discussed the Blue Room of Edens Hall. Dr. Skeen talked about Sam Carver. She also talked about the acceptance of female faculty in the 1940s. She discussed Dr. Raymond Hawk, Mabel "Hodgie" Hodges, Merle Kuder, Lorraine Powers and Dean Bill McDonald. She talked about the tea parties she hosted. Dr. Skeen discussed her family. She also discussed Edna Channer, Evelyn Odom and Arthur Hicks. She described her youth in Nebraska as well as her living family members. She talked about her brothers, Earle and Walt Stewart. She discussed her work with Altrusa and the Delta Kappa Gamma Society. She also discussed the book she wrote with Leona Bond entitled The Bond-Skeen Typing Program. The folder also contains newspaper articles and other information about Bearnice Skeen. Transcript of interview available.
1996 April 10
4/12 Swift, Al interviewed by Larry DeLorme
Al Swift, U.S. Representative of the 2nd Congressional District of Washington State, described why he pursued a political career. He discussed the radicalization of both liberalism and conservatism in the 1990s. He discussed the rise of Newt Gingrich and his beliefs. He talked about the destructiveness of radical partisan politics. Congressman Swift talked about his first campaign work for Lloyd Meeks. He discussed the rise of women as professional campaign workers and how that contrasts with their traditional role as volunteers. He also discussed the political history of the 2nd Congressional District. He talked about Dick Kink, Bill Clement and Irmine Geery. He discussed why voters have a deep cynicism toward the democratic process. Congressmen Swift discussed the complexity of campaign laws and how the professionalization of campaign workers has raised the cost of campaigns. He also discussed the need for enforced spending limits so as to bring political campaigns back down to a "human" level. He talked about Populists and the need for political accountability. He described a lack of focus on the part of the public regarding what they want of elected officials. He also described the poor reporting of the media. Congressman Swift discussed the volatility of major industrialized governments. He also talked about the insecurity of American jobs which results in public contempt for Congress. He described the political orientation of the 2nd Congressional district. He also talked about the Balanced Budget Amendment. Congressman Swift discussed the number of women now in the political system as opposed to their numbers in Congress. He described a group exercise he did with fourth-graders on democratic decision-making and how that reflects the outcome of all democratic processes. He also discussed his feelings on leaving Congress. Transcript of interview available.
1994 October 27
4/13 Symes, Ken interviewed by Steve Inge
Ken M. Symes, Vice Provost for Undergraduate and Extended Programs, came to Western in 1967 to teach medieval literature. He discussed Bill Clement and Sam Kelly. He also discussed Western from the years 1967 to 1987. He talked about the changes in Washington State higher education since 1987 and where Western fits in. Mr. Symes discussed the change from competitiveness to cooperation between educational institutions. He also discussed teaching by technology. He talked about people such as Paul Woodring, R.D. Brown, Pete Elich and Larry DeLorme.Transcript of interview available.
1999 January 19
4/14 Taylor, Kit (Christopher) interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Kit (Christopher) Taylor, Professor of Psychology, joined the faculty of Western in 1968 to teach Psychology. He discussed the student turmoil on campus in the late 1960s. He discussed the 1968 Northwest Freedom University Halloween party. He talked about Merle Meyer. He also talked about his personal reactions to the student protests of the late 1960s. Dr. Taylor discussed "invitation-only" poker games which included Paul Woodring, Stan Daugert, Henry Adams, Sam Kelly, Herb Taylor and Ulrich Mammitzsch. He also discussed Sam Kelly in detail. He talked about faculty unionization. He also talked about the deaths of President Robert Ross, Jeannene DeLille and Don Cole as well as the event that kept his wife, Saundra Taylor, from being on their flight. Transcript of interview available.
1999 April 29
4/15 Taylor, Saundra interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Saundra L. Taylor, Clinical Psychologist and Vice President for Student Affairs, joined Western's faculty in 1968 as an associate Professor in Psychology. She was assigned to the Counciling Center. She talked about her first assignment dealing with student protesters. She discussed being an African American councilor and people's pre-conceptions of her job at Western. She also discussed being a councilor-on-call for Fairhaven College. She talked about Chuck Harwood's vision for Fairhaven. Dr. Taylor described the Orcas Island student/administrator retreat of the early 1970s. She discussed President Paul Olscamp. She discussed the achievements of Vice President Quinlan. She talked about her stint as interim Vice President for Student Affairs under President Robert Ross as well as her permanent appointment to that position. She also discussed the plane crash that took the life of President Ross. Dr. Taylor talked about President Ken Mortimer. She discussed moving to the University of Arizona. She also discussed the Minority Achievement Program at Western. She talked about the Division of Student Affairs. Dr. Taylor discussed people she felt were her mentors such as Frank Nugent, Bill McKay, Mary Robinson, Jim Talbot, Jesse Hiraoka, President Ross and Paul Woodring. She talked about the pull of the local environment on faculty and how it factors into a decision to move on or stay at Western. She also talked about Ray Romine. Transcript of interview available.
1999 April 29
4/16 Vernon, Manfred interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Manfred Vernon, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, discussed his job rejection by the German Ministry of Justice based on racial prejudice in 1933. He discussed coming to the United States in 1939 and serving in the military during World War II. He described the jobs he had at the University of Michigan, the U.S. State Department and the University of Alabama. Dr. Vernon joined Western's faculty in 1964 to escape the social tensions of the South and to start the Department of Political Science. He talked about building the department from scratch and having it quickly admitted as a Graduate Department. He also talked about President James Jarrett, Paul Woodring, Ralph Thompson and President Harvey Bunke. He discussed his involvement with the Humanities Program. Dr. Vernon talked about student activities and turmoil in the late 1960s. He also talked about the difficulties of being department chair at that time. He discussed his involvement with Huxley College. He described attending the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm in 1972. Dr. Vernon retired in 1974 but was appointed Honorary Lecturer in Political Geography in the Geography department. He described his role in the American Sector of the International Point Roberts Board of the International Joint Commission United States-Canada. He discussed KVOS T.V., Al Swift, community conferences and Dixie Lee Ray. He also discussed presidents James Jarrett, Paul Woodring, Harvey Bunke, Jerry Flora and Paul Olscamp. Dr. Vernon talked about the tension between the need to teach and the need to research. He also discussed the changes in students since the 1960s. Transcript of interview available.
1993 April 21
4/17 Vernon, Manfred interviewed by Steve Inge
Dr. Manfred Vernon, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, discussed why he came to Western in 1964. He discussed his work starting the Political Science department and the lack of office materials. He also discussed Ann Halverson, John Wuest, John Hebal and Dick Payne. Dr. Vernon talked about the lack of materials in the library, his department gaining the right to issue graduate degrees and the beginning of the Honors Program. He discussed successful graduates, particularly Ralph Munro. He also discussed the difficulties of being department chair during the 1960s. He talked about Professor Colin Tweddell. Dr. Vernon described his involvement with Dr. Jim Scott on the Puget Sound Conferences, notably "Man, Government and the Sea", "Fisheries in the Puget Sound" and "Oil Transportation on Puget Sound." He discussed his connection with Huxley College. He talked about the student trip to the United Nations Conference on the Human Environment in Stockholm in 1972. He also talked about the extended traveling they did in Europe, including Communist Eastern Europe. He discussed the furor surrounding Point Roberts in the 1970s. He also discussed the television show he hosted on local station KVOS. Transcript of interview available.
2000 May 25
4/18 Watrous, Mary interviewed by James Scott
Dr. Mary Watrous, Professor Emeritus of Woodring College of Education, discussed her early education in New York and Nebraska. She was hired without an interview by Dr. Raymond Hawk in 1957. She discussed her first impressions of Western and President William Haggard. She also discussed President James Jarrett and the beginning of the Humanities Program. She talked about faculty growth and the low emphasis placed on teaching students. Dr. Watrous discussed the negative effect that grants have on faculty. She talked about student unrest over Vietnam in the 1960s. She also talked about being president of the Faculty Forum. She discussed Jerry Flora and Bill McDonald. There was more discussion on student turmoil in the 1960s. She also talked about grade challenges made by students. Dr Watrous discussed the Junior Writing Exam. She discussed President Paul Olscamp. She also discussed her run-in with the Affirmative Action Committee. She talked about the general acceptance of low quality doctoral dissertations since the 1960s and 1970s. She described the essential qualities of a college president. She discussed the decline in the quality of education in Washington and the rest of the nation. She also discussed the lack of value in current academic standards. Transcript of interview available.
1993 April 16
Subseries II: Computer diskette transcripts undated
Box/Folder
12/6 Back up computer diskettes undated

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Series II:  Audio Cassette Recordings, 1988-2000
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box/Folder
5/1 Adams, Henry 2000 July 5
5/2 Aitken, Margaret 1996 July 8
5/3 Anastasia, Angelo 1993 May 27
5/4 Arnett, Chappelle 1996 July 2
5/5 Benner, Rich 1991 April 1
5/6 Boles, Jerry 1999 January 21
6/1 Bond, Mary 1996 January 26
6/2 Bouverat, Roberta 1996 July 9
6/3 Brewster, Laurence 1993 March 2
6/4 Brewster, Laurence 1993 March 23
6/5 Broad, Carter 1993 February 26
6/6 Brown, Willard 1993 April 22
6/7 Bruce, Robert 1999 April 21
6/8 Buckland, Roscoe 1993 June 1
6/9 Bulcroft, Kris 1999 January 9
6/10 Bunke, Harvey 2000 August 29
7/1 Cary, Meridith 1996 June 25
7/2 Clothier, Nita 1993 August 12
7/3 Collier, Robert 1993 March 5
7/4 Critchfield, Howard I. 1993 April 13
7/5 Davis, James W. 1993 June 30; 1999 June 17
7/6 DeLorme, R. L. 1995 August 10
7/7 Diers, Carol 1996 July 1
7/8 Donker, Marjorie 1996 June 28
8/1 Estrada, Larry 1999 January 19
8/2 Fleetwood, Hugh 1993 August 10
8/3 Flora, Jerry 1993 March 9
8/4 Flora, Jerry 1999 August 18
8/5 Forrest, Marshall 2000 August 30
8/6 Francis, Richard 1992 August 2
8/7 Froderberg, Al 1999 June 19
8/8 Gelder, Harvey 1993 May 13
9/1 Goltz, H. A. “Barney” 1993 March 12
9/2 Goltz, H. A. “Barney” April 1, 1999; April 3, 1999
9/3 Gregory, William 1993 May 18; 1999 June 22
9/4 Harris, Richard 1993 August 4
9/5 Hearsay, Herbert 1996 April 30
9/6 Hiraoka, Jesse 1993 August 4
9/7 Hitchman, Jim 1993 May 25
10/1 Inge, Steve 1993 July 6
10/2 Jarrett, James 1999 May 3
10/3 Kelly, Sam 1993 July 7
10/4 Kelsey, Ruth 1995 October 31; 1995 November 16
10/5 Knapman, Fred 1993 March 8
10/6 Lowe, Florence M. 1988 August 29
11/1 Mason, David 2000 July 5
11/2 Mason, Evelyn 1993 August 16
11/3 Mayer, Erwin 1993 February 16
11/4 McInnis, Ray 1993 June 22
11/5 Mischaikow, Michael 1993 May 14
11/6 Mitchell, Howard 1993 June 17
11/7 Monahan, Robert July 16, 1993; June 22, 1999
11/8 Murray, Keith 1993 February 18
12/1 Olscamp, Paul S. 1998 December 4
12/2 O’Neil, Bill 1993 March 9
12/3 O’Neil, Bill and H. A. “Barney” Goltz 1993 August 13
12/4 Opening of the Archives 1993 August 5
12/5 Past Presidents: Bunke, Flora, Jarrett, and Olscamp 1993 February 24
12/6 Past Presidents: Bunke, Flora, Jarrett, and Olscamp
1993 February 24
12/7 Paulus, Ingeberg 1996 July 10
12/8 Ramsland, Dorothy 1993 August 9
13/1 Ramsland, Dorothy 1996 July 29
13/2 James Rhoads 1993 June 23
13/3 Robinson, Mary 1993 July 28; 1996 July 23
13/4 Ross, Alan 1993 May 6; 1995 August 29
13/5 Scott, James 1993 August 28
13/5 Scott, James 1993 August 28
13/6 Scott, James and R. L. DeLorme 1988 August 24
13/7 Skeen, Bernice, 1996 January 4; 1996 April 10
14/1 Swift, Al 1994 October 27
14/2 Symes, Ken 1999 January 19
14/3 Taylor, Kit 1999 April 29
14/4 Taylor, Saundra 1999 April 29
14/5 Vernor, Manfred 1993 April 21; 2000 May 25
14/6 Waltrous, Mary 1993 April 16

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Subjects

This collection is indexed under the following headings in the online catalog. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons, or places should search the catalog using these headings.

  • Corporate Names :
  • Western Washington University--Administration--History--Sources--Interviews.
  • Western Washington University--Centennial celebrations, etc--History--Sources.
  • Western Washington University--College of Ethnic Studies--History--Sources.
  • Western Washington University--College of Fine and Performing Arts--History-Sources.
  • Western Washington University--Dept. of Geography and Regional Planning--History--Sources.
  • Western Washington University--Faculty--History--Sources--Interviews.
  • Western Washington University--Fairhaven College--History--Sources.
  • Western Washington University--History--Sources.
  • Western Washington University--Huxley College of the Environment--History--Sources.
  • Western Washington University--Presidents--History--Sources--Interviews.
  • Western Washington University--Students--History--Sources.
  • Geographical Names :
  • Bellingham (Wash).--History--Sources--Interviews.
    • Subject Terms :
    • College teachers--Washington (State)--History--Sources--Interviews.
    • Community and college--Washington (State)--Bellingham--History--Sources.
    • Education--Washington (State)--Bellingham.
    • Oral History.
    • Student movements--Washington (State)--Bellingham--History--Sources.
    • Universities and colleges--History--Sources--Interviews.
      • Other Creators :
      • Bunke, Harvey C. (Harvey Charles),1922-
      • Flora, Charles J.(Charles Jerry)
      • Haggard, William Wade, 1902-
      • Jarrett, James L. (James Louis),1917-
      • Olscamp, Paul J.

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