Guide to the Abigail Scott Duniway Papers
1852-1992

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Overview of the Collection

Creator: Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915
Title: Abigail Scott Duniway papers
Dates: 1852-1992 ( inclusive )
Quantity: 9.25 linear feet (28 containers)
Collection Number: Coll 232B
Summary: Abigail Scott Duniway (1834-1915) moved to Oregon from Illinois in 1852 with her family on the Oregon Trail and kept a detailed journal of their travels. Duniway was later a key leader of the Woman's Suffrage Movement in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest, and she aided the national effort. This expansive collection contains her correspondence, published and unpublished literary works, documents pertaining to the suffrage movement, and a considerable amount of newspaper clippings reporting on Duniway's political and social work.
Repository: Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries

1299 University of Oregon
Eugene, Oregon, 97403-1299
(541) 346-3068
spcarref@uoregon.edu

Languages: Collection materials are in English. 
Sponsor: Funding for encoding this finding aid was provided through a grant awarded by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Historical Note

Abigail Jane Scott was born in Tazewell County, Illinois, on October 22, 1834. She was the third of twelve children of Ann Roelofson and John Tucker Scott. Abigail, whose family nickname was "Jenny," received only about 12 months of formal education. The Scotts crossed the plains to Oregon when Abigail was 17-years-old, and she kept the family journal of their journey. Her mother and youngest brother, Willie, died en route to Oregon. Abigail's journal served as the basis of her 1859 novel Captain Gray's Company, the first commercially printed novel in Oregon.

Duniway (then Scott) became a teacher in the small town of Cincinnati (now Eola), Oregon, while her family ran an inn in Lafayette. There, she met Benjamin Charles Duniway and married him August 2, 1853. The newlyweds moved to Ben's Clackamas County farm. After a few years, the Duniways moved to Yamhill County where Abigail started to write her first novel as well as anonymous letters to local newspapers. The Duniways lost their farm because Ben cosigned loans for a friend who defaulted following a catastrophic flood. The Duniways then moved to Lafayette, where Abigail taught school and ran a millinery shop while Ben created a washing machine and bred horses.

Duniway's thoughts and writings began to turn to suffrage in the 1860s. In 1871, she moved her family to Portland and, in May of that year, launched her weekly newspaper, The New North West. She also began to lecture throughout the Northwest along with nationally-renown suffragist Susan B. Anthony. Duniway sold her newspaper in 1886.

The Duniways had six children: Clara, Willis, Hubert, Wilkie, Clyde and Ralph. Clara died at a young age in 1886. Willis went on to be State Printer; Hubert became a lumber exporter; Wilkie was a printer for various Portland papers; Clyde became a professor and president of three universities, and Ralph was a prominent Portland attorney. Ben Duniway died in 1896.

Abigail Duniway was an indefatigable supporter of women's suffrage. She encountered personal set-backs such as poor health, money problems, and opposition from her brother Harvey Scott, who edited a local paper, The Portland Oregonian. She persisted despite political opposition in the form of local resistance, the consistent failure of women's suffrage referendums on state ballots, and divisions with Eastern suffrage organizations. This persistence paid off in 1912 when Oregon became the seventh state in the Union to pass a women's suffrage amendment. Governor Oswald West asked Duniway to write the proclamation for his signature. Duniway had the honor of being the first woman to register to vote in Multnomah County. During this period she also authored numerous novels. Abigail Jane Scott Duniway died on October 11, 1915.

Source: Moynihan, Ruth Barnes. Rebel for Rights: Abigail Scott Duniway (Yale University Press, 1983). Coll 232B, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Oregon.

Content Description

Suffrage Correspondence, the first series, contains letters concerning Abigail Scott Duniway’s work in the suffrage movement.

The second series is Family Correspondence, consisting of letters both to and from Abigail Scott Duniway. Most letters are from Abigail to her son Clyde; the topics range from politics and religion to local family news.

The third series is Non-Family Correspondence, containing letters concerning Abigail’s books, portraits, and letter after her death.

The 1852 Journal series contains the original 1852 Overland Journal which Duniway kept as her family crossed the plains, as well as a photocopied 1853 revision and typed copy galley proofs. Business records of Covered Wagon Women are also included.

Manuscripts (Abigail Scott Duniway) contains nearly three boxes of Abigail’s writings. They are further divided into Unpublished and Published. These include contain notes, speeches, poems, serialized novels, rough and final copies of novel manuscripts, stories, pamphlets, and a few copies of the New NorthWest. (The novel Captain Gray’s Company can be found in the Rare Books Collection. Other published books and novels by Duniway can be found in the Oregon Collection.)

The series Manuscripts By Others comprises published and unpublished speeches, pamphlets, and notes. Highlights include Clyde A. Duniway’s "My Memories of Abigail Scott Duniway."

Business Papers include deeds, public records and trust account ledgers, as well as various miscellaneous records.

Biographical Information contains mostly newspaper articles about Duniway before and after her death. Also included are fictional radio scripts.

The Miscellany series contains a variety of items pertaining to Abigail Scott Duniway, including a steel engraving print, Suffrage Hymn sheet music, and a copy of Duniway’s Path Breaking. Of note is Duniway’s 2-volume set of scrapbooks that she compiled herself.

Scrapbooks include news clippings.

The Oversize series includes materials that intellectually belong within the other series, but are stored in larger boxes. Everyone should review this series in case there are materials pertinent to your research.

Use of the Collection

Alternative Forms Available :  

Partially available in microfilm as part of: Women's lives. Series 3, American women missionaries and pioneers collection (MICROFILM BV3703 .W66 2006, reel 81-92); Primary Source Microfilm, 12 Lunar Dr., Woodbridge, Conn. 06525.

Restrictions on Access :  

Collection is open to the public.

Collection must be used in Special Collections & University Archives Reading Room.

Restrictions on Use :  

Property rights reside with Special Collections & University Archives. Copyright resides with the creators of the documents or their heirs. All requests for permission to publish collection materials must be submitted to Special Collections & University Archives. The reader must also obtain permission of the copyright holder.

Archival material may contain materials with sensitive or confidential information that is protected under federal and/or state right to privacy laws and other regulations.

Researchers are advised that the disclosure of certain information pertaining to identifiable living individuals represented in this collection without the consent of those individuals may have legal ramifications (e.g. a cause of action for invasion of privacy may arise if facts concerning an individual's private life are published that would be deemed highly offensive to a reasonable person) for which the University of Oregon assumes no responsibility.

If a researcher finds sensitive personal information in a collection, please bring it to the attention of the reading room staff.

Preferred Citation :  

[Identification of item], Abigail Scott Duniway Papers, Coll 232B, Special Collections & University Archives, University of Oregon Libraries, Eugene, Oregon.

Administrative Information

Arrangement :

Collection is organized into the following series:

  • Series I: Suffrage Records
  • Series II: Family Correspondence
  • Series III: Non-family Correspondence
  • Series IV: Oregon Trail Journal (1852)
  • Series V: Literary Works by Abigail Scott Duniway
  • Series VI: Literary Works by Others (alphabetical by author)
  • Series VII: Family Records
  • Series VIII: Biographical Information on Abigail Scott Duniway
  • Series IX: Miscellany
  • Series X: Scrapbooks
  • Series XI: Oversize

Acquisition Information :  

Gift of David Duniway in 1995.

Processing Note :  

Collection processed by Amber Davis, Veta Schlimgen, and Amanda Faber, Manuscripts Processors, April 2006.

This finding aid may be updated periodically to account for new acquisitions to the collection and/or revisions in arrangement and description.

Related Materials :  

Other collections relating to Abigail Scott Duniway at Special Collections and University Archives include: Duniway Family papers, Coll 232A.

Photographs of Abigail Scott Duniway might be found in the Duniway Family papers.


Detailed Description of the Collection

Series I:  Suffrage records
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries A: Correspondence
This correspondence arranged chronologically and is incoming and outgoing letters intermixed
Box
Folder
1 1 Correspondence March 14, 1895-April 2, 1897
Box
1 New York City, New York. Carrie Chapman [Catt] to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Catt is delighted the Republicans of Idaho are willing to back a suffrage amendment, but it is not enough. The women need to be organized. "You say that somebody says they will ask for Eastern help when they want it." Duniway should send help now, while there is money. Catt wants to hold a two day convention in Boise with Anthony, Shaw, Duniway, and DeVoe. "Now you know I do not consider Anthony a safe campaign, but she is good in conventions," "her name will certainly draw a larger audience." Catt wants to delay the work in Idaho a little. She would "value a great deal more the objections to an organizer." If she hadn't heard them so many times before by ignorant people, "who fear that it means the introduction of the old reputed short-haired woman with bloomers." "It is our duty to build up organizations."
1895, March 14
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Senator Mitchell
2.0 pages
"You took council of your humble friend 24 years ago, and thus made a turning point in your career that led you to fame and honor...Will you listen to me now?" Duniway wants him to decline being a candidate for re-election and to suggest Rufus Mallory, M.C. [Scorye] T.T. Leer or Sol Hirsh or others. This would "checkmate" his enemies, and reunite the party. "Victory under present conditions would be even worse for you than defeat."
1897, February 3
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Senator Mitchell
4.0 pages
Duniway responds to Senator Mitchell's letter concerning Duniway's exhortation to not run for office (February 3, 1897) Duniway explains she is not asking him to surrender, as he thinks, but to "rise above existing conditions and prove your greatness." By not running, it "would raise you up friends in all directions, and might result in your immediate and triumphant re-election." Duniway says that the senator is surrounded by men who limit his view of the future. Duniway supports Mitchell because he supports the movement.
1897, February 10
1 Oregon City, Oregon. C.H. Dye to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
(Written on "Willamette Valley Chautauqua Association" Letterhead.)Dye wants Duniway to ask Clyde [Dye] to come and speak at the Chautauqua program. Letter discusses expenses. Publication of The Pacific Empire has been suspended.
1897, April 2
1 2 Correspondence February 10, 1898-April 2, 1900 (?)
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Mrs. Colby
3.0 pages
Mrs. Colby thinks if women get the vote they "might vote away from men their favorite beverages." Duniway denies this. Discussion ensues. Calls for a unification.
1898, February 10
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Mrs. Hill
2.0 pages
(Written on Oregon Congress of Women Letterhead.) Short note on Washington Suffragists.
1898, May 3
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Harvey Scott
1.0 page
(Written on the back of "An Open Letter" by the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association.) Duniway states that The Oregonian has failed to give women the correct election returns. Duniway asks Harvey to overcome his sex and support the women of his family.
1900, June 9
1 Silverton, [Oregon?]. Mary A. Hubert to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Likes The Pacific Empire, and is sending her payment for subscription.
1900, April 2
1 3 Correspondence March 22, 1905-June 1, 1906
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Mrs. Colby
2.0 pages
Duniway fears the previous day's meeting left a bad impression. Duniway hopes to dispel her fears through letter. Because of Colby's ignorance of local methods, she is doing the suffrage movement "infinite harm." Other "plain talk" is "needful." "If you will not let us alone you will be compelled to bear the blame of our defeat, as you so in Washington!" Includes The Oregonian editorial clipped from an undated 1906 edition titled "What Defeated Woman Suffrage?"
1905, March 22
1 Full page from The Evening Telegram
Advertisement for voting yes on the Equal Suffrage Constitutional Amendment.
1906, June 1
1 4 Correspondence 1906
Box
1 Abigail Scott Duniway to Editor of the Women's Club Department of The Journal
2.0 pages
Duniway offers some history of the local Women's Club and Suffrage movement.
1906, [undated]
1 5 Correspondence June 30, 1906-July 28, 1906
Box
1 Abigail Scott Duniway to The Dalles Optimist
1.0 page
A Suffrage plea that includes thoughts on The Optimist's treatment of suffrage, prohibition and consumption of alcohol, and what needs to be done to overcome this. "Our present Local Option Law will keep the State in a constant ferment of intoxication in the interest of intemperance until it is made fair and honest by [an] equitable and fair amendment. But that can never be until the mother element in our humanity is allowed its liberty."
1906, June 30
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to [Alice Stone?] Blackwell
2.0 pages
The chief gain of the last campaign is showing the national leaders that Duniway has a standing before the voters, which alone made the campaign possible. Her one mistake was allowing national subjects "to discuss for themselves that the two or three malcontents, who posed before them as it were, freaks out parasites, whom the public wouldn't follow." Colby is the greatest menace to the next campaign before stirring up strife between Duniway and the prohibitionists. "Your fool friend is always your worst enemy." To dispel rumor that Duniway retired from the cause and is leaving it to the prohibitionists will be her work for the next two years. "It is not my fault, though it seems to be my misfortune, that the public of the entire Pacific NW will persist in considering me the leader, and the voters will not recognize her."
1906, July 28
1 6 Correspondence July 30, 1906-October 1906
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Editor Post Express
1.0 pages
Duniway responds to a letter published in the Post Express. "The freaks of voters are as uncertain as the storms they raise from time to stay--they cannot stop--the inevitable triumph of Human liberty, which is based, not upon sex, or gender, but the abstract principle of right and justice." "Equal suffrage cannot be defeated where it has never been born." She compares the movement with Aeronauts, Oregon Pioneers, and slaves each overcoming their challenges. Duniway calls the men who voted no "18,000 ignorant and nomadic Hobos." She talks on prohibition and suffrage.
1906, July 30
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Wessenger
1.0 pages
Duniway is enclosing a letter, to be circulated only among honorable men and women. "There must be, a peaceable and just way to regulate the Liquor Traffic... and thus stop the intemperate agitation which keeps everybody in a turmoil of angry excitement..."
1906, August 10
1 Portland. Abigail Scott Duniway to Boyer
2.0 pages
Duniway encloses some recent clippings of public support. She wants the national officers to see them, as she knows that they want the next campaign to win. "And I am moral sure it will win if I am allowed to manage it." She is aware of how essential this sounds but all local people know she is right. Half of the needed signatures have been obtained due in part to Duniway's articles appearing in newspapers. Duniway complains about the National sub-agents, but is loyal to head office and officers. She says their blunders must not be repeated in Oregon. She was going to Newport, Oregon, to make an address.
1906, August 13
1 Mt. Airy, Pennsylvania. Anna Howard Shaw to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 pages
Reverend Shaw is sending back the previous letter and clipping explaining that she as well as others have seen them many times over from various sources. She thought it a waste of the national officers' time to continue its line of action, and she has sent the result to the Oregon State Society. She said she hopes Oregon women will quit antagonizing those who might be helpful to them.
1906, September 14
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Anna Howard Shaw
2.0 pages
(Written on Petition Invitee paper.) Duniway tells Reverend Shaw not to worry. The WCTU [Women's Christian Temperance Union] won't have time to organize a prohibition campaign. "We could do nothing, at all satisfactory, with the petitions, "till the 'controversy' which fills you with so much 'Sorrow' that it brings from you a coherent reply (as from one intoxicated)." Duniway has received letters from the leading men of Old Oregon who have supported her for 35 years. She complains about Colby ("the fool"). "You and your co-officers and agents are evidently working for organization, glory and salary." Duniway points out that if the National had needed her advice from 1889, it would "have led to the enfranchisement of woman in every Pacific Coast State." "Do you not notice? And can you not learn from experience that the national method not only never wins a state election, but can never even get a campaign started?"
1906, September 18
1 Abigail Scott Duniway Labeled Chapter correspondence
2.0 pages
Duniway doesn't have a copy of the letter to which she is replying. Duniway responds to the following letter by saying she was merely reporting to her what she had heard about the petition which later was found to be illegal. The letter following shows Shaw's "[ ? ] as suffragists, and her information that it was I [Shaw] who was 'disgusting men,' presumably by quarreling with them, became extremely laughable in the light of subsequent events." Duniway doesn't know what exactly was written about her to Shaw, but supposes they were from her very few individual opponents. "I was at that time, too busily engaged in resurrecting the suffrage ship her methods had wrecked."
1906, October
1 Mt. Airy, Pennsylvania. Anna Howard Shaw to Abigail Scott Duniway
1pages
(See September 18, 1906. Duniway to Shaw.)Duniway's letter reached Shaw after her return from Europe. She cannot express her "deep sorrow" at the "unnecessary and unwise discussion in the public print between woman who ought, if they care for the cause over which they are contending, to know that nothing could bring more aid and comfort to the enemy than just such a futile controversy." This is successfully turning attention of the public from themselves and disgusting men for they would refuse to sign the suffrage petition." Shaw is not surprised that men are refusing to sign. She states Duniway had told her 6,000 names were on the petition when in fact Pease says there are about 2695 unverified and less than 2000 verified. She has also received word that "since this controversy has begun, men are refusing their signature" or signing false names. The National officers will communicate further with the state officers.
1906, September 12
1 7 Correspondence October 2, 1906-December 17, 1906
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Anna Howard Shaw
1.0 pages
(Open letter.) The national office has accused Duniway of lying and she tells them she will take them to court if they ever step in Oregon.
1906, October 2
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Dr. Annice F. Jeffereys-Myers (copy)
3.0 pages
Duniway has been called to Tillamook, Marion, Linn, Benton and Lincoln Counties to speak; this would allow growth as it did from 1871-1900, and would have achieved victory in 1906 "if the state had been allowed to consummate its own plan." Duniway gives some history of recent speeches and their reception. She says it will take work to restore the movement before the national workers took over, but it will be done if Duniway takes the state chair again. "God knows I do not want the Job; but I have dared greater things." Duniway left the state last fall so that the national officer could run their "stereotyped plan," even though they have never won a state election that way. She won't display the "while feather" again. Gregg from back east has written a letter to Duniway that is the first to show the "least disposition of National agent or officer to change its methods." Duniway wants $1500 from the national Association. She hope they will cast aside "personal ambition" and give Oregon "a fighting chance." The Oregonian is now with Duniway's cause, She will never cease personal sacrifice for liberty no matter who assails her.
1906, October 4
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Harriet Taylor Upton (copy)
2.0 pages
Duniway complains about the national methods and how they had an alliance with W.C.T.C. [Women's Christian Temperance Union] and caused "liberty to possess a tail to the Prohibition kites." If the next campaign is run the same way it will fail. " But it will not be run in the same way!" Colby, Luenna Johnson and "an old local cat on the state board" brought unfortunate conditions. Duniway is bringing back the leading people into the work despite the "stabs in the back given by Anna Shaw and Rachel Foster Avery of which I trust they will be ashamed."
1906, October 13
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Boyer
2.0 pages
"Had a monkey and Parrot tire at the annual election!" The Prohibition contingent tried to take over but were defeated 2 to 1. Duniway elected State President. Her mood seems improved as she signs off "so Ta-Ta-dear!"
1906, December 17
1 8 Correspondence December 21, 1906
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Dr. Annice Jeffreys (copy)
6.0 pages
Letter gives an account of a speech to the Oregon Historical Society at the fourth annual meeting. "The instinct of enlightened government is the instinct of self preservation." She must protest two words in the State Constitution in the article of privileges and elections; "while" and "male." "Justice and liberty do [not] in one sex only: that life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness are inherent in every individual." The men who are still alive that framed the State Constitution are in support of suffrage.
1906, December 21
1 9 Correspondence 1906--April 2, 1907
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway copy of speech (given to either Oregon Federation of Women's Clubs or Women's Clubs of Portland)
5.0 pages
Speech on what women have achieved over the last 30 years. Duniway looks towards the future as a rally cry.
1906 [undated]
1 New Orleans, Louisiana. Kate M. Gordon to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Kate Gordon is the corresponding secretary of the NAWSA [National American Woman Suffrage Association] and she wrote on NAWSA letterhead. Gordon doesn't know how Duniway is going to keep the June 1908 election quiet until just before the election because the petitions must be turned in to the Secretary of State five months prior to the election.
1907, March 22
1 Portland, Oregon. Executive Committee of the Oregon State Equal Suffrage. Association to Executive Committee of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. (copy)
2.0 pages
The State Executive Committee has approved the following lines of work1. To return to the quiet method of procedure2. To follow the lines of least resistance3. To disclaim and disavow all affiliations with any and all political associations organized for any other purpose than to secure a majority for enfranchisement of women.4. To only hold parlor and precinct meetings5. To hire old soldiers to canvas for signatures for petitions6. To charge $1.00 a head at meetings.Also the State asks for $2,000 from the National Association. This is a two-part letter, the reply to the following is written on the second page and will be noted.
1907, April 2
1 10 Correspondence April 27, 1907-June 7, 1907
Box
1 New Orleans, Louisiana. Kate Gordon to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Apparently Duniway sent Gordon a letter with a clipping from a newspaper indicating that Duniway said that she had received letters from all National officers admitting their mistakes. Gordon says this is "absolutely without foundation," and demands Duniway release a press statement denying this. It is the very least the State Association owes to the National officers. "We do not acknowledge any errors on our part." Gordon points out an April McClures Magazine article that says the liquor, prostitution, and gambling elements put up over 300,000 dollars.(Duniway apparently responds on the same letter, whether or not it was sent is unknown.)
1907, April 27
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Kate Gordon
Duniway cannot find the copy of her reply to the letter above. Blames local unauthorized new accounts for the erroneous clipping, "It is immaterial to us whether you do, or do "not acknowledge any errors on our (your) part." We all (know) they occurred..."
1907, September 23
1 Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Anna H. Shaw to Abigail Scott Duniway (copy)
2.0 pages
The National Board has decided not to accept the State proposition. (see April 2, 1907 letter). The National office has never voted money to be expended by the State Associations without specific direction from the National Association, much less to have it given to a special committee upon which the president of the State could draw at discretion. She has sent an alternate for the National Business Committee and if approved it will be forwarded. Shaw says she hopes the work in Oregon will continue by getting signatures for petitions.
1907, May 10
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Kate Gordon (copy)
1.0 pages
Short note to tell Gordon that Duniway is sending an original reproduction of the proposal (from April 2, 1907). In a postscript she says "the petitions as planned by the National are pronounced illegal, as they contain no penalty clause, etc."
1907, May 22
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Anna Howard Shaw (copy)
1.0 pages
Duniway has sent the petition used for the last election to Attorney General Crawford for study. He found that it would easily be attacked in Court. At her own expense Duniway is making up new "legal" petitions. The State committee is disappointed for the lack of financial support offered by the National Committee after they failed in the last campaign. Duniway was not surprised "as I looked for nothing else."Duniway points out that in 1900, with a $100 contribution and no interference, the measure was just shy of 2,000 votes from passing. In 1906 with full support of the national the measure lost by over 10,000. "If they continue to withhold the help that, after their failure, is our dream..." Then Duniway will win anyhow "or die trying" and convince other states "that the National Association is composed chiefly of hot air."
1907, May 27
1 New Orleans, Louisiana. Kate Gordon to Abigail Scott Duniway (copy)
1.0 pages
Gordon has just received Duniway's copy of the letter she sent to President Shaw [see May 27, 1907. Duniway to Shaw.] Gordon doesn't wonder why Duniway doesn't like Shaw's reply since Gordon has already sent Duniway the business committee procedures.The sum of $2,000 is beyond the power of the National to grant. Gordon believes that the work of the National is to assist only in securing signatures for petitions, and as 3,000 of these have been granted, $250 is all that is needed to gain the rest. This is all Duniway can expect to receive, but this is only a personal opinion. The "dreadful articles" in the Oregon paper about the National keep the National at bay concerning Oregon.
1907, May 29
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Kate Gordon
3.0 pages
[Draft?] (Written on Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association [OSESA] letterhead on reverse side is Declaration of Principles of the OSESA for Campaign 1907-1908). Duniway tells Gordon that if it wanted to, the National could assist the state. Duniway reminds her that she was loyal to the National during the last campaign, even though she knows what the Nationals were doing was a mistake. The "Dummy Bull" was going to be taken by the horns, according to one member of the National Committee. But Duniway "dodged the lariat and fell obediently into line, loyally carrying the National banner." As president of the State she will bring back the state of the movement to where it was in 1905. Duniway could easily raise the $500 she needs by publishing the correspondence between State and National, but won't. Duniway holds no animosity towards any National officer and has forgiven President Shaw for lying.
1907, June 7
1 New Orleans, Louisiana. Kate Gordon to Abigail Scott Duniway (copy)
1.0 page
Gordon resents the tone of a letter sent to President Shaw, and resents the manner in which Duniway expresses her opinion of the National's handling of affairs, "your lack of dignity reflects sadly upon you as the leader of the State."Gordon said she would recommend that the National withdraw from Oregon. The judgment of the board was correct, "the only thing that could be done for Oregon was "to leave her securely alone."
1907, June 7
1 11 Correspondence June 7, 1907-September 9, 1907
Box
1 Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Anna Shaw to Abigail Scott Duniway (original and copy)
2.0 pages
This is a very cordial letter stating that Shaw has no information regarding the budget proposal. Shaw wants a copy of the Attorney General's letter about the illegal petition [see May 27, 1907 Duniway to Shaw]. The National will help as it sees fit after all the petitions are secure.
1907, June 10
1 Swarthmore, Pennsylvania. Anna Shaw to Abigail Scott Duniway (original and copy)
1.0 page
Shaw has received Duniway's letter of the 18th with the enclosed letter of the Attorney General. Shaw mentions that she works with so many wealthy and influential persons on the Advisory Board, she asks why they haven't come to Duniway's assistance.
1907, June 24
1 Warren, Ohio. Kate Gordon to Oregon State Executive Committee
1.0 page
By a vote of a sub-committee of the Business committee, it was decided to send the "full" correspondence on Oregon to them so they can see why the National Association could not justify a continuance of any financial co-operation with the state, (includes copies of letters dated May 22, 27, 29; June 7, 10, and 24, all from 1907.)
1907, September 9
1 12 Correspondence September 16, 1907-December 9, 1908
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Kate Gordon
2.0 pages
Duniway thanks Gordon for the letter copies. She implies that Gordon has deliberately left out some letters, but it is acceptable as Duniway has copies that she will release to the press which will do more good than the modest sum of $2,000 they had decided. Duniway says that the National Executive Committee is dodging and evading financial and moral obligation. At the present, Duniway will hold the correspondence for the press.
1907, September 16
1 Abigail Scott Duniway to Editor of Oregon Agriculture College Barometer (photocopy)
2.0 pages
Duniway sends to the Barometer a "declaration of Principles of the OSESA" [Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association] with the hope that it will be published.
1908, April 20
1 Financial statement prepared by Duniway 1908, August
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Carrie Chapman Catt
1.0 page
Duniway has talked with Sarah Evans who advised against circulating another petition at this time. A citizen's suffrage bill might come up before the Legislature in February. "The amendment now on, will be recalled on an amendment substituted, for full suffrage in 1910." They need a deposit of $1,000 in cash for the gathering of 20,000 signatures in 6 weeks.
1908, December 9
1 13 Correspondence February 8, 1909-January 30, 1912
Box
1 Copy of resolution of the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association's Executive Committee
1.0 page
The resolution is an appeal to add to the following article to the City of Portland's' Charter: "It is hereby provided that no resident, tax-paying citizen of the municipality of Portland shall be denied the right to vote on account of sex."
1909, February 8
1 Portland, Oregon. C.F. Wiegand to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on letterhead of the Office of the Auditor of the City of Portland.) Wiegand says he is directed by the committee on Charles Revision to inform Duniway that on technical reasons they will not add to the charter the clause submitted by the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association. However, if the clause was resubmitted as a separate proposition it would receive support.
1909, February 9
1 Ontario, Oregon. Estelle Dodge to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on The Ontario Optimist letterhead.) Dodge supports the cause and wishes Duniway to tell her how she can help.
1911, February 14
1 First Open Meeting of the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association held by Louise Bryant
4.0 pages
The notes quote various speakers at the meeting.
1911, December
1 Portland, Oregon. Sarah A. Evans to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on Oregon Federation of Women's Clubs letterhead.) Evans is responding to Duniway's letter (not included) and answering Duniway's choice of scenery. Evans says she can only guess at what Duniway is referring to. A note on the bottom of the letter by Duniway dated April 5, 1914, says "the secrecy to which Evans alludes, was her determination to decline the maker, leader and founder of the campaign - myself."
1912, January 30
1 14 Correspondence February 1912-September 1912
Box
1 Pamphlet, "A Nineteenth Century Constitution and Twentieth Century Needs" by Alice Henry (published by the National American Woman Suffrage Association)
3.0 pages
February, 1912
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Executive Board of Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association
1.0 page
A declaration announcing that Sarah A. Evans has resigned from the position on the National Committee representing Oregon.
1912, February 27
1 Portland, Oregon. George Roosevelt to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Thank you note for flowers given to a Colonel Roosevelt.
1912, September 11
1 San Francisco, California. Selina Solomons poem dedicated to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
1912, September
1 15 Correspondence October 18, 1912-October 22, 1912
Box
1 O. Russet to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
A short letter thanking Duniway for her work and wishing her a Happy Birthday.
1912, October 18
1 Sacramento, California. Laura Grace Riddell to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Birthday Greetings.
1912, October 21
1 Salem, Oregon. Willis Duniway to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Birthday Greetings.
1912, October 22
1 Portland, Oregon. Alexander Bernstein to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Birthday Greetings.
1912, October 22
1 The Dalles, Oregon. Milton A. Miller to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Birthday Greetings.
1912, October 22
1 16 Correspondence October 22, 1912-November 8, 1912
Box
1 Medford, Oregon. Medford Equal Suffrage Club to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Birthday Greetings.
1912, October 22
1 Portland, Oregon. Irene Smith Calbreath to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Calbreath writes an encouraging letter praising Duniway.
1912, October 22
1 Portland, Oregon. Lilian M. Hackleman to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Birthday Greetings
1912, October 22
1 Portland, Oregon. [G. E.] Sharon to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
On I.O.O.F. letterhead. Birthday Greetings.
1912, October 22
1 Aberdeen, Washington. Dora and Robert to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Congratulations on the victory.
1912, November 8
1 Cleveland, Ohio. Cleveland Women Suffrage Party to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Congratulations on the victory.
1912, November 8
1 New York, New York. National Suffrage Association to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Congratulations on the victory. "Long Live Oregon Man."
1912, November 8
1 Chicago, Illinois. Illinois Equal Suffrage Association to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Congratulations on the suffrage victory.
1912, November 8
1 17 Correspondence November 19, 1912-[undated] 1912
Box
1 St. Louis, Missouri. Eva Perry Move to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on General Federation of Women's Clubs letterhead.) Birthday Greetings and congratulations on the victory.
1912, November 19
1 Ontario, Oregon. Estelle Riddle Dodge to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Dodge requests a 200-300 word essay and a photograph from Duniway that Dodge can print in the local paper.
1912, December 11
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Draft of a letter encouraging men to support suffrage
1912, [undated]
1 Portland, Oregon. Fred Lockley to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Congratulations on the victory.
1912, [undated]
1 Oregon State Association Opposed to the Execution of the Suffrage to Women
1.0 page
Open letter to men of Oregon to stop implementation of suffrage amendment.
1912, [undated]
1 18 Correspondence September 24, 1912-September 13, 1913
Box
1 San Francisco, California. Selena Solomons to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Solomons sends some clippings and asks whether or not Duniway received some little books she sent. She mentions Duniway's illness as a reason why she has received no response.
1912, September 24
1 "An Appeal to Patriotism" by the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association. Includes a list of names on the back [list of donations?]
1.0 page
1912 [undated]
1 Portland, Oregon. Roswell Dorch to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Dorch is going to make a "middle" of Duniway. Duniway is not responsible for its production or custody.
1913, July 31
1 Seattle, Washington. M.J. Hayden to Abigail Scott Duniway
5.0 pages
Hayden writes relating to Duniway's political activities in Washington, including the campaign of the "Arch find" George Turner. Hayden asks for Duniway's help in defeating him.
1913, September 13
1 19 Correspondence October 17, 1913
Box
1 The Dalles, Oregon. Sylvia Thompson to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Thompson writes an introductory letter for Peter Kuehuling who is going to ask for Duniway's help in defeating a local prohibition law. (The letter from him is not in the collection.)
1913, October 17
1 20 Correspondence November 12, 1913-December 15, 1913
Box
1 Eugene, Oregon. Catherine Carson to Abigail Scott Duniway
6.0 pages
Carson, a member of the Gamma Phi Beta sorority at the University of Oregon, has learned that Duniway will be invited to the University to lecture, and would like to invite her to visit the sorority. Ruth Duniway, Duniway's granddaughter, is a member of the sorority.
1913, November 12
1 Eugene, Oregon. Edith Baker to Abigail Scott Duniway
Duniway has been elected an honorary member of the Local Alumnae Association of the University of Oregon, in recognition of her services to the University and the State.
1913, December 15
1 21 Correspondence January 8, 1914
Box
1 Eugene, Oregon. Catherine Carson to Abigail Scott Duniway
4.0 pages
Carson writes to tell Duniway she has been elected as an honorary member of the Women's Press Club of the University of Oregon. Carson also asks for an autographed picture. Letter includes a map entitled "Wet and Dry Map of California, January 1, 1914" as well as copies of an anti-prohibition pamphlet entitled "A Challenge to Discuss the Other side of the Liquor Question" by George Harrison.
1914, January 8
1 22 Correspondence February 2, 1914-March 3, 1914
Box
1 Hartford, Connecticut. Katherine Houghton Hepburn to Emma Smith DeVoe
1.0 page
(Copy of letter DeVoe sent to Duniway.)Hepburn asks DeVoe to comment on the policy outlined by Alice Paul and Burns on defeating the Democrats in Power. Hepburn asks if the voters in the west would be willing to help defeat them. She refers to enclosed statements that are not present in the letters.
1914, February 2
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Katherine Houghton Hepburn
2.0 pages
(Copy of letter sent to Abigail Scott Duniway.)DeVoe believes Paul should remain independent. DeVoe also criticizes the National, as being a "great hindrance in nearly every state where the National has participated." "Their contortions... during our Washington campaign, are too ridiculous to relate." DeVoe says that the National is stupid for criticizing Paul and Burns. She wonders when the non-voting suffragists of the East will quit bickering over petty issues (like defeating the Democrats) and work on the important issues. For more information, Hepburn is invited to write to Duniway.
1914, February 10
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Auditor [of the Oregonian?]
1.0 page
The well-meaning men and women should promote prohibition and they "will learn in time that there is no surer way of manufacturing drunkards."
1914, February 9
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on National Council of Women Voters letterhead.) Duniway has sent $10 to DeVoe for her trip to Idaho, and sent another $10 to Dr. King to start the fund for the Council's 1915 convention. DeVoe sends a copy of a letter from the Connecticut president and her reply (See February 2, 1914).
1914, February 12
1 Portland, Oregon. Susie Clark to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Clark liked Duniway's letter in the February 28th issue of The Spectator. Clark notes that the "responsibility of parents is the key note... and a high standard of honor, real, not simulated, on both school and church." She agrees with Duniway on Prohibition.
1914, March 3
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on National Council of Women Voters' Letterhead.) DeVoe thanks Duniway again for her donation and gives a report on her trips.
1914, March 3
1 23 Correspondence March 11, 1914-April 23, 1914
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Editor ( The Oregonian)
2.0 pages
Duniway offers her view on why Prohibition is bad at a business level.
1914, March 11
1 Eugene, Oregon. Bertha Dorris to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Thank-you note for story and words of encouragement.
1914, March 20
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to [unidentified]
2.0 pages
(Written on Taxpayers and Wage Earners' League of Oregon letterhead.) Cora C. Talbott's name has been cut out as secretary because she "came into our work as a traitor and spy." First part is a proclamation about the League. The second part is hand written invitation from Duniway to read Chapter VIII of her book Path Breaking [ Path Breaking: An Autobiographical History of the Equal Suffrage Movement in the Pacific Coast States, 1914] which is on the churches' opposition to woman's suffrage. Duniway also asks for donations.
1914, March 24
1 Eugene, Oregon. Barbara Booth to Abigail Scott Duniway
7.0 pages
Booth, a senior at the University of Oregon, writes for information regarding Duniway's early years teaching school. "I feel that I have asked a great deal of you, considering your advanced age and failing strength..."
1914, April 4
1 Carthage, Illinois. Pastor M.L. O'Hara to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on the back of the pamphlet entitled "True Temperance by The Nestor of the Women Suffrage Movement," published by the U.S. Brewer's Association.) The pamphlet contains Duniway's views of prohibition. Duniway's pamphlet is being used as a defense for the saloons. "The arguments in this pamphlet are unworthy of the respect of a logical or Christian mind."
1914, April 23
1 24 Correspondence July 7, 1914-August 19, 1914
Box
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
DeVoe explains why she hadn't visited Duniway recently. If women left everything alone but women's suffrage they would gain their freedom quickly.
1914, July 7
1 Warren, Ohio. Harriet Taylor Upton to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on Ohio Woman Suffrage Association letterhead.) Upton writes a brief letter describing recent events in Ohio.
1914, August 4
1 Portland, Oregon. Edward D. Baldwin to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on Oregon Republican State Central Committee letterhead.) Baldwin informs Duniway that Republican State central committee is going to appoint a seven-woman advisory committee. He asks if Duniway would accept an honorary appointment to be a member of that committee.
1914, August 14
1 Portland, Oregon. Statement by Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
A definition of the Oregon Taxpayers and Wage Earner's League.
1914, August 19
1 25 Correspondence August 19, 1914-September 3, 1914
Box
1 Lewiston, Idaho. Ethel E. Redfield to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Redfield asks Duniway for a statement on the "status of women in America--their condition and achievement," it will be incorporated into Redfield's speech at the Tseminicum Club of Lewiston, Idaho.
1914, August 19
1 Portland, Oregon. Anonymous "Club Woman" to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
A letter reprimanding Duniway because she is "Anti-Prohibition."
1914, August 27
1 Eugene, Oregon. Prince Lucien Campbell to Abigail Scott Duniway
6.0 pages
Campbell (president of the University of Oregon) thanks Duniway for her contribution to the Woman's Building. He remembers hearing Duniway when he was a boy, and is a lifelong proponent of suffrage, but is also a lifelong "convert" to prohibition. He hopes this won't hinder the relationship.
1914, September 3
1 26 Correspondence September 5, 1914-September 6, 1914
Box
1 San Francisco, California. Sara Bard Field [Ehrgoth] to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Field has admired Duniway as one of her modern "heroines." And hopes to visit her in Portland soon.
1914, September 5
1 Portland, Oregon. Robert A. Miller to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Miller thanks Duniway for the copy of Duniway's book Path Breaking [ Path Breaking: An Autobiographical History of the Equal Suffrage Movement in the Pacific Coast States, 1914] and also a favorable mention in the book.
1914, September 5
1 Portland, Oregon. Josephine DeVoe Johnson to Abigail Scott Duniway
6.0 pages
A thank-you note to Duniway for her book and she sends a poem in return.
1914, September 6
1 27 Correspondence September 17, 1914-September 25, 1914
Box
1 Walla Walla, Washington. Lucie Issack to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
A thank you note for Duniway's book and personal mention.
1914, September 17
1 Gervais, Oregon. Ella M. Finney to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Finney introduces herself to Duniway and tells of her life and campaign in favor of temperance in Southern Oregon.
1914, September 24
1 Washington, D.C. Alice Paul to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Thank you note from Alice Paul, Chairman of the Congressional Union for Women Suffrage, for a copy of Duniway's book.
1914, September 24
1 E. Eggert to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Duniway has been approved to be President of the Tax Payers and Wage Earner's League of Oregon
1914, September 25
1 28 Correspondence September 26, 1914-October 1, 1914
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to A. Eppstein
2.0 pages
Duniway sends a clipping of an ad, and complains that the only truth printed is newspapers is through ads like this one. Duniway sends out lots of copies of her book. She just had 7 teeth pulled. A former colleague of Duniway's has switched sides and is speaking at a Prohibition meeting. Duniway that this "Dr.-----" wants to fight but Duniway will pay no attention to her like "the moon pays to a puppy's barking." (Includes: June 1, 1906 newspaper clipping from the Oregon Evening Telegraph.)
1914, September 26
1 Washington D.C. Thowald Solberg to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Library of Congress copyright card for Duniway's book Path Breaking [ Path Breaking: An Autobiographical History of the Equal Suffrage Movement in the Pacific Coast States.
1914, September 29
1 Portland, Oregon. Elisabeth Eggert to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
A long letter detailing Eggert's hope for "the annihilation of the liquor traffic." Eggert alludes to the fact that perhaps Duniway is being exploited in her old age. Duniway's book, Eggert contends, is part of the anti-prohibition propaganda, and therefore she is returning the copy Duniway sent her unopened.
1914, October 1
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to A.M. Eppstein
1.0 page
Duniway talks her plan to cultivate a back fire on the W.C.T.U. [Women's Christian Temperance Union] and Anti-Saloon League, by distributing her book among the women Prohibitionists with the aim of affecting them financially. Duniway is going to republish her book in the East after "carefully" revising it.
1914, October 1
1 29 Correspondence October 2, 1914-October 6, 1914
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Elisabeth Eggert
1.0 page
Eggert is not the only woman who owes Duniway for suffrage, and prove "ungrateful." But Eggert is the only one to refuse Duniway's book, "That will live and flourish long after you are both forgotten."
1914, October 2
1 "Mrs. Abigail Scott Duniway on the Woman Suffrage Movement, October 6, 1914" a report by D. A. Norton (of Portland, Oregon)
10.0 pages
"A report of an Address which was to have been given by Abigail Scott Duniway, at a mass meeting of citizens at Library Hall, October 5, from which she was detained by illness." A short history and current events included.
1914, October 6
1 30 Correspondence October 30, 1914
Box
1 St. Louis, Missouri. Form letter from M.J. Lowenstein to "Friend"
7.0 pages
(Form letter written on Woman's National Publishing Company" letterhead.) Letter acknowledges receipt of $5 in payment of a subscription to the Woman's National Weekly. Letter includes six copies of individually-numbered "Subscription Oil Receipts."
1914, October 30
1 31 Correspondence November 4, 1914-December 26, 1914
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Josephine Burri to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
A reply to Duniway's ad looking for a housekeeper/cook.
1914, November 4
1 St Paul, Minnesota. Martha Foster Freeman to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Freeman thanks Duniway for her book and the many memories it brought up. [Possibly an old student of Duniway's.]
1914, November 5
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Editor of The Oregonian
3.0 pages
(Copy or Rough Draft.)Duniway writes of her search for a housekeeper and its relevance to prohibition. "No victory can be permanent if founded on self righteous, defamation of character, or confiscation of property."
1914, November 24
1 Washington, D.C. Lucy Burns to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Excerpts from a letter urging local suffragists to rally together and send letters to their Congressman so that they will know there is significant backing for woman's suffrage, when Congress votes on this issue in January, 1915.
1914, December 26
1 32 Correspondence December 29, 1914-[undated] 1914
Box
1 Marshfield, Oregon. Agnes Lockhart Sengstacken to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
A very warm thank you note for Duniway's book. Sengstacken's mother was a friend of Duniway's, and at 90 years of age enjoyed having the book read to her.
1914, December 29
1 Addie G. Barlow to Abigail Scott Duniway
8.0 pages
A description of the process Barlow went through to get a photograph of herself to send to Duniway for publication in a book. Barlow sends high praise to Duniway for her life's work and gives a brief history of her own past.
1914, [undated]
1 33 Correspondence [undated] 1914
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Letter describes the Tax Payers and Wage Earners League of Oregon. Letter includes three documents: a copy of the pamphlet "A Challenge to Discuss the Other Side of the 'Liquor Question'" by George Harrison; a newspaper clipping on the prohibition debate; and an anti-prohibition poster.
1914, [undated]
1 34 Correspondence January 5, 1915-February 6, 1915
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. E. Eggert to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Eggert writes to inform Duniway that she won't discuss with Duniway matters over which they so "radically differ."
1915, January 5
1 San Francisco, California. Iva B. Garritt to Abigail Scott Duniway
7.0 pages
Garritt talks of her interviews with Oregon Governor James Withcombe.
1915, February 6
1 35 Correspondence February 10, 1915-March 31, 1915
Box
1 Boston, Massachusetts. Alice Stone Blackwell to Abigail Scott Duniway
5.0 pages
Although Blackwell disagrees with Duniway concerning the liquor question, the reason Blackwell did not review Duniway's book was due to lack of time.
1915, February 10
1 Portland, Oregon. Laura B. Douney-Bertlett to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
A brief note to inform Duniway that she has been re-elected to be first Vice President of the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Society.
1915, March 13
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to [unidentified]
2.0 pages
(Written on Tax Payers and Wage Earner's League of Oregon Letterhead.) Duniway sent her revised Path Breaking [ Path Breaking: An Autobiographical History of the Equal Suffrage Movement in the Pacific Coast States, 1914] to be circulated and asks for expenses for publishing the book. She talks of the "Traitor and Spy" whose name has been cut off the top.
1915, March 24
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to [unidentified]
2.0 pages
(Written on Tax Payers and Wage Earner's League of Oregon Letterhead.) Similar to the previous letter announcing her gift of the book and then asking for funds. Talks of the "traitor" whose name has been cut off of the top.
1915, March 24
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to [unidentified]
2.0 pages
(Written on Tax Payers and Wage Earner's League of Oregon Letterhead.) Same as the previous two letters but goes into brief suffrage Prohibition history.
1915, March 24
1 Portland, Oregon. Lida M. O'Bryon to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
O'Bryon was to get information on Women Lawyers in Oregon, but has had a set back. Judge Moreland said there were about 25 women admitted to the bar of Oregon. O'Bryon will try to get more information as soon as possible.
1915, March 31
1 36 Correspondence April 2, 1915-April 12, 1915
Box
1 St. Louis, Missouri. R. P. [O'Connor] to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
"Unit Share Receipt" for the Woman's National Weekly.
1915, April 2
1 Portland, Oregon. J.D. Abbot to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on James, Kerns and Abbot Company Letterhead.) A letter explaining that it cost $315 instead of $300 to print Duniway's book due to cost in adding another chapter.
1915, April 3
1 New York, New York. Alice Paul to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
(Written on Congressional Union for Women's Suffrage Letterhead.) Paul tells Duniway of the "Plans of the Union," including becoming a National Organization with local officers and how they would go about raising funds.
1915, April 8
1 New York, New York. Alda E. Belmont to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Belmont is the chairman of the committee to organize a woman voter's convention of the C.U.W.S. [Congressional Union for Women's Suffrage] and is asking Duniway if she would be a vice-chairman for the committee. Belmont doesn't ask for Duniway's time, just her name as it "would be a great strength to us in organizing this."
1915, April 10
1 Oakland, California. M. Noyes to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Noyes relates an anecdote from 1883 or '84 in which Duniway was speaking in a courthouse and some man turned off the gas. Duniway responded "I can talk just as well in the dark." Noyes also asks for advice on becoming a circuit speaker on temperance.
1915, April 11
1 Salem, Oregon. James Withcombe to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Withcombe (governor of Oregon) recognizes Duniway's endorsement for A.E. Borthwick for membership on the Child Labor Commission, and will give her consideration.
1915, April 12
1 37 Correspondence April 28, 1915-May 2, 1915
Box
1 San Francisco, California. Geo. M. Hyland to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
An invitation to stay at the Oregon Building as a guest of the Oregon Commission of the Panama Pacific International Convention (in San Francisco) during the National Woman Voters Convention.
1915, April 28
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Algev
2.0 pages
Duniway and others "have not sought Presidential suffrage in the Coast States as we found it to be a sort of stumbling block." Duniway is concerned over the situation in Illinois, but the leaders are "brainy women' and will win suffrage in time." The Congressional Union with Alice Paul "seems to be gaining friends for the cause lending thinkers."
1915, April 29
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
(Written on Susan B. Anthony Council of Women Voters letterhead.) DeVoe writes of a woman who is trying to tarnish women's suffrage in Oregon. She also writes of local activities among the different women groups.
1915, May 2
1 38 Correspondence May 7, 1915-May 18, 1915
Box
1 Washington, D.C. Ida Husted Harper to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Duniway is invited to be the guest of honor at the Pioneer's Meeting for the Congress of the National Council of Women Voters, to be held July 9, 1915, in San Francisco.
1915, May 7
1 San Francisco, California. Geo. M. Hyland to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Hyland informs Duniway of the special hostess to be appointed by the Anti-Saloon League. The letter includes reference to a copy (included) of a letter to Samuel Cononel from O.M. Clark considering Duniway for the position.
1915, May 18
1 Fort Jones, California. Mrs. Garritt to Abigail Scott Duniway
11.0 pages
Garritt can't believe the gall of some women who would seek the same recognition as Duniway. Garritt has told Phobe Hearst that Duniway was coming for a visit so they could meet.
1915, May 18
1 39 Correspondence May 19, 1915-May 26, 1915
Box
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
DeVoe writes of Sewall who wants to be president of the Council. DeVoe is glad Duniway is being entertained when she goes to San Francisco. She hopes Duniway will take the lead in the creation of a central head of the Council Research State.
1915, May 19
1 New York, New York. Carrie Chapman Catt to Alice Paul and members of the Board
3.0 pages
A very spirited letter demanding that the Congressional Union's [for Women's Suffrage] efforts at the Federal level stop in and around New York State. She is particularly displeased that representations of the Congressional Union heckled the President in Philadelphia.
1915, May 24
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
DeVoe is anxious for the convention. She thanks Duniway for helping Cline of Corvallis join. She also thanks Duniway for helping pay the cost of the stationery. "You are always doing some kind act like that to the Council." Duniway is to encourage Dr. Coe to attend the convention.
1915, May 26
1 40 Correspondence May 27, 1915-June 3, 1915
Box
1 Steilacoom, Washington. Addie Barlow to Abigail Scott Duniway
6.0 pages
Barlow doesn't like DeVoe's work and fears that by having Duniway's name on the letterhead with DeVoe that Duniway's approval is on it as well. Barlow also talks of the peace movement and how it is harmful at that time.
1915, May 27
1 Washington, D.C. Cora Smitt King to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Dr. King has no sympathy for President Wilson in his efforts to dodge the suffrage question, and thinks it proper that groups of women visit him as often as they can to win suffrage by the national route.
1915, May 27
1 Washington, D.C. Ida Husted Harper to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Harper acknowledges that Duniway will attend the Pioneer's Meeting in San Francisco [at the Pan Pacific Exposition], but tells her she will have to deliver her speech "Marching to Victory" sometime else as there is no time during the meeting.
1915, June 3
1 41 Correspondence June 11, 1915-June 14, 1915
Box
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
DeVoe knows Paul's heart is true but believes her tactics are wrong. If the Susan B. Anthony Amendment passed they would have too many campaigns to fight and it would never pass two-thirds of the states. She talks of the coming convention.
1915, June 11
1 Washington, D.C. Alice Paul to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Paul writes to inform Duniway that she and the Congressional Union [for Women's Suffrage] are not hindering any campaign, but doing what they have always been doing, mainly lobbying Congress and trying to secure new members. If Duniway has any objections to this she is to let Paul know.
1915, June 14
1 42 Correspondence June 24, 1915
Box
1 New York, New York. Alice Paul to Member of the Advisory Council (Abigail Scott Duniway)
1.0 page
Catt has sent letters in regard to the Congressional Union [for Women's Suffrage] to all members of the Advisory Council. In response, Paul is sending her entire correspondence with Catt, "so that you may be in a better position to answer the points which she raises.This letter includes the following copies:
1915, June 24
1 New York, New York. Carrie Chapman Catt to Alice Paul
2.0 pages
Catt thinks, along with her Empire State Campaign Committee, that trying to achieve suffrage by campaigning at the Federal level, at least in New York, is detrimental to their efforts of trying to achieve suffrage at the state level. They ask the Congressional Union to stop campaigning in New York.
1915, April 12
1 New York, New York. Alice Paul to Carrie Chapman Catt
1.0 page
Paul explains that the Congressional Union is in no way trying to campaign against the local suffrage movement but is simply using New York as a headquarters to overlook the rest of the country.
1915, April 15
1 New York, New York. Carrie Chapman Catt to Alice Paul
1.0 page
Catt acknowledges the receipt of the previous letter and will "trust in your promise that New York is to have a free field."
1915, April
1 New York, New York. Carrie Chapman Catt to Harriet Taylor Upton
1.0 page
Catt writes to Upton, President of Ohio Woman Suffrage Association, and tells her she should not have invited the Congressional Union into her state as they will destroy the local effort.
1915, April 19
1 New York, New York. Alice Paul to Carrie Chapman Catt
In a lengthy reply, Paul refutes Catt's claims from a previous letter.
1915, June 24
1 43 Correspondence July 12, 1915-July 15, 1915
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Hugh Hume to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
A thank you note from Hume, Editor of The Spectator, to Duniway for her letter from the San Francisco convention.
1915, July 12
1 St. Louis, Missouri. Mrs. Joseph Scott to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Scott writes to ask if Duniway is her long lost sister-in-law.
1915, July 15
1 New York, New York. Newsletter: "Headquarters Newsletter. National American Woman Suffrage Association."
4.0 pages
1915, July 15
1 44 Correspondence August 3, 1915-August 12, 1915
Box
1 New York, New York. Olive Stott Gabriel to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
(Written on the Women Lawyer's Association Letterhead.) Gabriel asks Duniway if she would be willing and able to write a 500-word article about the progress made since suffrage was established in Oregon.
1915, August 3
1 Walla Walla, Washington. Lucie F. Issacs to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Issacs wants to know about the Congressional Union [for Women's Suffrage] and its Convention in September. Most of what Issacs has heard of the Congressional Union was "much to be deplored." She doesn't understand why they keep Anthony's name on the front of the Amendment when "The world of suffragists knows we have a greater than Anthony with us."
1915, August 7
1 Tacoma, Washington. Emma Smith DeVoe to Abigail Scott Duniway
4.0 pages
DeVoe introduces the new corresponding secretary of the National Council of Women Voters. Only Foster (the new secretary) and Duniway are worried about raising money so DeVoe leaves it to them to find a way to raise it.
1915, August 12
1 45 Correspondence August 13, 1915-August 30, 1915
Box
1 San Francisco, California. H.F. Stall to Abigail Scott Duniway
2.0 pages
Stall sends Duniway a list of the people who bought books that are California Grape growers and winemakers.
1915, August 13
1 Oregon City, Oregon. George C. Brownell to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Brownell answers Duniway's position on Prohibition. Brownell believes that Prohibition will, if implemented now, effect the next generation. "I never saw a boy yet who saw his father smoke a pipe, who did not sooner or later get out behind the wood pile and try to smoke one himself."
1915, August 25
1 Salem, Oregon. Frank Davey to Abigail Scott Duniway
1.0 page
Davey is writing to refute a letter written to Duniway by Ella Dawn Moore that claims the prisoners are being treated unjustly at the Oregon State Penitentiary. Davey, the Chief at the State Penitentiary, denies all accusations.
1915, August 25
1 Portland, Oregon. Ella Dawn Moore to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Moore is disappointed to learn that Duniway forwarded her letter to Davey. She fears that this will cause the helpless prisoners harm. Her purpose in writing Duniway was to have Duniway "enlist some of the prominent women in the cause of prisoner reform." Moore goes on to explain she got her information from the prisoners and the current administration is corrupt. She also received "a long letter from the Governor, in which he expresses annoyance."
1915, August 30
1 46 Correspondence September 13, 1915-September 15, 1915
Box
1 Sioux City, Iowa. Wallace Short to Abigail Scott Duniway. Duniway has suggested a National Self-Government Alliance "to include all those who adhere to the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the U.S."
2.0 pages
1915, September 13
1 Tacoma, Washington. Mrs. Ernest Lister
"Testimony of Governors Concerning Woman Suffrage in Their Respective States" compiled by Mrs. Ernest Lister
1915 [undated]
1 Eugene, Oregon. M. Ruth Guppy to Abigail Scott Duniway
3.0 pages
Duniway has donated money to the University of Oregon for Duniway Hall [named Gerlinger Hall] and Guppy sends a thank you note.
1915, September 15
1 47 Miscellaneous correspondence May 27, 1907-February 26, 1908
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to National President
2.0 pages
Duniway is upset because the National President's response to a letter that she wrote to her is overdue. She also criticizes her refusal to allow the National Committee to assist them in their cause. Finishing the letter, she writes, "it will not be hard to convince other states (as some of them believe already) that the National Association is composed chiefly of hot air".
1907, May 27
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to [Kate] Gordon
2.0 pages
Gordon has sent a letter to the governor of Oregon in which she makes "awful" accusations against Duniway. Normally this type of letter wouldn't bother her but Gordon claimed that she was the author of the "vulgar" letter against Clay.
1907, July 10
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Kate M. Gordon
2.0 pages
Duniway is writing in response to Gordon's criticism of the National President. Gordon sent her letters of the correspondence between the National President and her and is delighted to receive them and to later release them to the press. Duniway is certain that these letters will do better for there campaign than $2,000 refused to them by the National Treasury.
1907, September 16
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Clay
2.0 pages
Duniway expresses her appreciation and gratitude for a substantial donation to the upcoming campaign that will undoubtedly help. She then briefly writes about Boyer and Anna Howard Shaw. Then, she thanks Clay once again.
1908, February, 26
1 48 Miscellaneous correspondence May 5, 1908-November 24, 1908
Box
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Coe
2.0 pages
Duniway is sending a receipt to Coe showing how much money the campaign used in April. She then mentioned the support the newspapers across Oregon have given. She also mentions the help the campaign has and will receive throughout the year. She also wants Coe to read her article in the Pacific Monthly.
1908, May 5
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Clay
1.0 page
Duniway tells Clay of the, "very subdued and muffled" tyranny of the state's media. In Eugene, Salem, Astoria, and the Dalles she will have to have to pay for her letter to be published. She writes, "we are letting the men believe this is a thin fight". Coe phoned in another $100 receipt.
1908, May 30
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Clay
2.0 pages
Duniway informs Clay that the newspapers are not printing anything new about their campaign. She has just learned that thousands of tickets have been marked, 317 + NO, before they were dispersed to the voters. It is disappointing for her to see the "underhand tricking of the opposition", especially when her committee has worked harmoniously and is still determined to get ahead. She is also encouraged by the letters she received from loyal supporters that send their love.
1908, June 5
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Clay
1.0 page
The Executive Committee has announced to Duniway that they are out of debt with a small balance that can be the start of next years work. They are also going to celebrate the 37th anniversary of the Association and are also receiving support from the W.C.T.U. [Women's Christian Temperance Union] and the Prohibition Party.
1908, November 24
1 49 Miscellaneous correspondence November 24, 1908-November 12, 1976
Box
1 Abigail Scott Duniway to Clay
1.0 page
(Written on Taxpayers' Suffrage Amendment Initiative Petition paperwork.) Duniway informs Clay that her secretary made a mistake in a typed document and Duniway's name is spelled wrong. Duniway wrote by hand supplementary information about the suffrage initiative nationally.
1908, November 24
1 Roseburg, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Jones
1.0 page
Duniway thanks him for the encouragement that his 13th mlt. victory in California gave her. She also quotes him as saying, "earnest thinking men are coming to recognize equal rights for their mothers." The free women of San Francisco are now petitioning for their beliefs but Duniway sees no reason for there to be alarm since they do have their freedom.
1911, October 7
1 Portland, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Clay
2.0 pages
The many postcards, letters, and messages given to Duniway for her 78th birthday have given her a more purpose. She has the work on their pending amendment ready to submit by January. This letter is her first attempt at writing in nine months; she had been bedridden, due to a collapse she suffered because of the long strain of her work.
1912, October 24
1 Roseburg, Oregon. Abigail Scott Duniway to Jones
1.0 page
Duniway has heard of Jones' bid for Congress in the up-coming elections. She expresses the hope that the women living in his district take into account his "votes for women" when they needed it most. Duniway also writes, "We need friends in Congress above anything else."
1913, September 13
1 Lexington, Kentucky. Herbert Finch to David C. Duniway
1.0 page
A friendly letter from Finch informing Duniway that he will be receiving some copies of Finch's grandmother's letters. Finch also says it was a pleasure meeting Duniway and that he should visit if he is ever in the area.
1962, October 11
1 Salem, Oregon. David C. Duniway to Herbert Finch
1.0 page
(Reply to Finch to Duniway; October 11, 1962.) He thanks Finch for the letters relating to the National Woman Suffrage Movement written by Abigail Scott Duniway, his grandmother. He says that she will finally be acknowledged once her biography is written. The visit they had in Lexington was enjoyable.The next four letters are stapled together: first two out of chronological order.
1962, November 11
1 Seattle, Washington. David C. Duniway to Judith Combs
1.0 page
Duniway thanks Combs for the copies of his grandmother's letters. He says that adding them to the family papers will prove to be interesting for people researching the history of suffrage.
1969, June 16
1 Salem, Oregon. Judith Combs to David Duniway
1.0 page
Enclosed are photocopies of the papers mentioned in the June 16, 1969 letter (above). Combs also says she is looking forward to meeting him.
1969, June 9
1 Photocopy. Portland, Oregon. Duniway to E. Semple
1.0 page
Duniway, assuming because of the year that she is either a daughter or granddaughter of Abigail Scott Duniway, acknowledges the sum of twenty dollars that she owes to E. Semple. Also she sends only good will and wishes.
1874, October 20
1 1876, November 12 (1 page). Photocopy. Portland, Oregon. Duniway to Eugene Semple
Duniway thanks Semple for his donation.
Subseries B: Other Suffrage Documents
Box
Folder
2 1 Record of Pledges for Oregon State Woman Suffrage Campaign
3 1 Speech Given to Illinois State Legislature re: Women's Political Rights 1977
3a 1 Pamphlet, "A Famous Woman" describing a series of lectures by Duniway 1886
3a 2 Program pamphlet, the Twenty-Seventh Annual Convention of the National-American Woman Suffrage Association 1895
3a 3 Pamphlet, Second Biennial Session of the Oregon Congress of Women April 11, 12, and 13, 1898
3a 4 Pamphlets, The Campaign Leaflet, 1900 (vol. 1, nos. 3 and 7)
3a 5 Pamphlet, "Woman Suffrage Not Wanted in Oregon" by Mrs. R.W. Wilbur [Alice Hustis Wilbur] 1900
3a 6 Program booklet, the Thirty-seventh Annual Convention of the Nation American Woman Suffrage Association June 28 to July 5, 1905
3a 7 Invitation to a reception at the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition 1905
3a 8 Card with Abigail Scott Duniway's printed portrait, Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition October 6, 1905
3a 9 Invitation to a reception to honor Abigail Scott Duniway March 15, 1906
3a 10 Program for the Political Equality League Banquet, Pendleton, Oregon October 8, 1912
3a 11 Notice for the Seventeenth Annual meeting of the American Woman Suffrage Association undated
3a 12 Booklet, "True Temperance by the Nestor of the Woman Suffrage Movement" by Abigail Scott Duniway undated
3a Open Letter to the voters of all political parties of the State of Oregon..." undated
3a 13 Songs used for "Miss Anthony's Lecture" undated

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Series II:  Family correspondence
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Subseries A: Duniway, Clyde A. (son). Letters from Abigail Scott Duniway
Box
Folder
4 1 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 22, 1886-May 14, 1892
4 2 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 22, 1892-December 26, 1892
4 3 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 7, 1893-February 18, 1893
4 4 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 2, 1893-May 21, 1893
4 5 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 24, 1893-October 22, 1893
4 6 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 31, 1893-December 31, 1893
4 7 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 14, 1894-March 12, 1894
4 8 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 31, 1894-May 12, 1894
4 9 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 20, 1894-July 29, 1894
4 10 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 3, 1894-October 10, 1894
4 11 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 21, 1894-December 31, 1894
4 12 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 13, 1895-February 26, 1895
4 13 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 1, 1895-May 29, 1895
4 14 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 2, 1895-July 13, 1895
4 15 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 21, 1895-November 1, 1895
4 16 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 14, 1895-December 22, 1895, and undated
4 17 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 5, 1896-March 15, 1896
4 18 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 18, 1896-September 1, 1896
4 19 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 9, 1896-October 18, 1896
4 20 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 29, 1896-December 29, 1896
4 21 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 7, 1897-February 27, 1897, and undated
4 22 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 9, 1897-May 24, 1897
4 23 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 30, 1897-July 18, 1897
4 24 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 24, 1897-October 13, 1897
4 25 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 18, 1897, and undated
4 26 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 13, 1898-March 15, 1898
4 27 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 20, 1898-May 6, 1898
4 28 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 17, 1898-June 3, 1898
4 29 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 12, 1898-October 4, 1898
4 30 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 16, 1898-December 31, 1898
4 31 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 10, 1899-February 5, 1899
4 32 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 11, 1899-February 19, 1899
4 33 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 2, 1899 and undated
4 34 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 11, 1899-May 11, 1899
5 1 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 22, 1899-July 10, 1899
5 2 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 21, 1899-december 24, 1899
5 3 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 8, 1900-January 24, 1900
5 4 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 29, 1900-March 25, 1900
5 5 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 1, 1900-May 17, 1900
5 6 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 24, 1900-June 27, 1900
5 7 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 17, 1900-September 20, 1900
5 8 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 26, 1900-November 15, 1900
5 9 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 21, 1900-November 29, 1900
5 10 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 5, 1900-December 31, 1900
5 11 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 9, 1901-January 17, 1901
5 12 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 26, 1901-February 18, 1901
5 13 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 24, 1901-March 13, 1901
5 14 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 1, 1901-June 23, 1901
5 15 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 1, 1901-September 19, 1901
5 16 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 3, 1901-December 11, 1901
5 17 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 25, 1901-June 22, 1902
5 18 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 29, 1902-December 29, 1902
5 19 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 13, 1903-June 3, 1903
5 20 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 7, 1903-September 30, 1903
5 21 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 28, 1903-November 16, 1903
5 22 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 23, 1903-February 24, 1904
5 23 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 6, 1904-August 14, 1904
5 24 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 21, 1904-October 9, 1904
5 25 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 18, 1904-December 7, 1904
5 26 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 11, 1904-December 26, 1904
5 27 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 3, 1905-March 14, 1905
5 28 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 18, 1905-May 21, 1905
5 29 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 28, 1905-July 13, 1905
5 30 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 17, 1905-October 15, 1905
5 31 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 16, 1905-December 31, 1905
5 32 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 9, 1906-March 21, 1906
6 1 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 3, 1906-August 26, 1906
6 2 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 9, 1906-December 31, 1906
6 3 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 11, 1907-April 22, 1907
6 4 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 22, 1907-July 4, 1907
6 5 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 14, 1907-July 25, 1907
6 6 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 8, 1907-November 21, 1907
6 7 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 27, 1907-December 27, 1907
6 8 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 3, 1908-March 26, 1908
6 9 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 6, 1908-April 16-1908
6 10 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 24, 1908
6 11 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 4, 1908-August 30, 1908
6 12 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 7, 1908-October 1, 1908
6 13 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 10, 1908-October 26, 1908
6 14 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 2, 1908-November 22, 1908
6 15 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 4, 1908-December 29, 1908
6 16 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 4, 1909-February 1, 1909
6 17 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 6, 1909-April 3, 1909
6 18 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 24, 1909-May 15, 1909
6 19 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 31, 1909-June 21, 1909
6 20 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 12, 1909-August 24, 1909
6 21 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 7, 1909-October 24, 1909
6 22 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 2, 1909-November 22, 1909
6 23 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 6, 1909-December 24, 1909
6 24 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 6, 1910-January 22, 1910
6 25 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 14, 1910-March 20, 1910
6 26 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 6, 1910-May 12, 1910
6 27 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 1, 1910-July 12, 1910
6 28 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 11, 1910-September 25, 1910
6 29 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 2, 1910-November 21, 1910
6 30 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 4, 1910-December 26, 1910
6 31 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 1, 1911-February 27, 1911
6 32 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 13, 1911-May 6, 1911
6 33 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 13, 1911-July 24, 1911
6 34 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 25, 1911-September 18, 1911
6 35 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 25, 1911-December 9, 1911
6 36 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 18, 1911-December 25, 1911
6 37 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 5, 1912
7 1 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 11, 1912-February 5, 1912
7 2 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 7, 1912-August 2, 1912
7 3 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 20, 1912-September 15, 1912
7 4 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 24, 1912
7 5 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 8, 1912
7 6 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 20, 1912
7 7 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 30, 1912-December 26, 1912
7 8 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 4, 1913-February 20, 1913
7 9 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 27, 1913-March 10, 1913
7 10 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 13, 1913-March 27, 1913
7 11 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 30, 1913-April 6, 1913
7 12 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 22, 1913-May 14, 1913
7 13 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 28, 1913-June 14, 1913
7 14 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 23, 1913-June 24, 1913
7 15 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 4, 1913-July 21, 1913
7 16 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 24, 1913-September 14, 1913
7 17 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 16, 1913-September 28, 1913
7 18 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 2, 1913-October 21, 1913
7 19 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway October 15, 1913-October 28, 1913
7 20 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 21, 1913-November 26, 1913
7 21 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 2, 1913
7 22 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway December 20, 1913-December 30, 1913
7 23 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 4, 1914-January 8, 1914
7 24 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 18, 1914-February 12, 1914
7 25 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway February 17, 1914
7 26 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 11, 1914
7 27 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 24 1914
7 28 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 9, 1914-April 26, 1914
7 29 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 27, 1914-May 22, 1914
7 30 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 24, 1914
7 31 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 4, 1914-June 22, 1914
7 32 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 23, 1914-July 18, 1914
7 33 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway July 22, 1914-September 6, 1914
7 34 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway September 12, 1914-November 5, 1914
7 35 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway November 28, 1914-December 23, 1914
7 36 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway January 21, 1915-March 12, 1915
7 37 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 18, 1915-March 25, 1915
7 38 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway March 25, 1915
7 39 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway April 7, 1915-April 27, 1915
7 40 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway May 12 1915-June 21, 1915
7 41 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway June 30, 1915-July 22 1915
7 42 Letters to Clyde A. Duniway August 12, 1915-September 17, 1915
Subseries B: Family Correspondence, General
Box
Folder
8 1 Brown, Mary T. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway June 24, 1893-November 11, 1894
8 2 Buckley, Ralph. Letter to Abigail Scott Duniway July 15, 1915
8 3 Cook, Frances. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway May 20, 1914-February 5, 1915
8 4 Duniway, Ben Charles. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway May 4, 1862-February 10, 1890
8 5 Duniway, Ben Cushing. Letter from Abigail Scott Duniway November 23, 1911
8 6 Duniway, Caroline Cushing. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway December 30, 1900-October 13, 1915
8 7 Duniway, Clyde. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway June 1 1892-October 16, 1901
8 8 Duniway, Clyde. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway October 20, 1901-November 20, 1901
8 9 Duniway, Clyde. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway November 24, 1901-June 21, 1914
8 10 Duniway, Clyde. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway June 28, 1914-May 16, 1915
8 11 Duniway, Clyde. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway May 23, 1915-September 12, 1915
8 12 Duniway, D.C. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway June 1, 1897-July 28, 1897
8 13 Duniway, Hubert and Elenora. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway June 4, 1902-August 31, 1914
8 14 Duniway, Hubert and Elenora. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway September 21, 1914-June 16, 1915
8 15 Duniway, Hubert and Elenora. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway July 18, 1915-August 24, 1915
8 16 Duniway, Hubert and Elenora. Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway August 24, 1915-September 9, 1915
8 17 Duniway, Wilkie. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway December 21, 1893-July 14, 1915
8 18 Duniway, Ralph. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway July 28, 1902-August 13, 1915
8 19 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway December 25, 1893-August 14, 1903
8 20 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway April 12 1907-February 1, 1908
8 21 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway October 21, 1908-April 12, 1909
8 22 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway October 24, 1909-January 5, 1911
8 23 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway May 12, 1911-December 27, 1912
8 24 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway February 2, 1913-July 30, 1913
8 25 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway October 14, 1907-September 4, 1913
8 26 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway October 14, 1907
8 27 Duniway, Willis and Alice. Letters to and from Abigail Scott Duniway September 30, 1913-February 2, 1915
8 28 Scott, John Tucker. Letter from Abigail Scott Duniway June 30, 1879
8 29 Earl Stearns: Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway February 7, 1892-March 9, 1899
8 30 Earl Stearns: Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway March 20, 1899
8 31 Earl Stearns: Letters to Abigail Scott Duniway February 2, 1903-February 14, 1903
8 32 Mrs. J.W. Owen: Letter to Abigail Scott Duniway September 6, 1891

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Series III:  Non-Family correspondence
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
9 1 Betts, E.D., letters to Abigail Scott Duniway August 28, 1911-October 27, 1911
9 2 Booth, Mrs., letters from Abigail Scott Duniway June 29, 1914
9 3 Nicholson, Mrs., letter from Abigail Scott Duniway
May 23, 1908
9 4 Parker, Inez E. Adams, letter regarding Abigail Scott Duniway February 18, 1929
9 5 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking March 26, 1915-April 1, 1915
9 6 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking April 2, 1915-April 6, 1915
9 7 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking April 6, 1915-April 12, 1915
9 8 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking April 12, 1915-April 17, 1915
9 9 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking April 21, 1915-May 6, 1915
9 10 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking May 11, 1915-June 6, 1915
9 11 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking June 7, 1915-August 28, 1915
9 12 Acknowledgments of the book Path Breaking 1915
9 13 Letters regarding the death of Abigail Scott Duniway October 10, 1915-October 13, 1915
9 14 Letters regarding the death of Abigail Scott Duniway October 14, 1915-October 16, 1915
9 15 Letters regarding the death of Abigail Scott Duniway October 18, 1915
9 16 Letters regarding the death of Abigail Scott Duniway October 19, 1915-October 23, 1915
9 17 Letters regarding the death of Abigail Scott Duniway October 23, 1915-October 26, 1915
9 18 Letters regarding the death of Abigail Scott Duniway October 27, 1915-November 9, 1915

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Series IV:  Oregon Trail Journal (1852)
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
9a Original Oregon Trail journal
Folder
10 1 Journal, 1853 revision (photocopy)
10 2 Journal, 1853 revision (photocopy)
10 3 Journal, 1853 revision (photocopy)
10 4 Journal, 1853 revision (photocopy)
10 5 Journal, 1853 revision (photocopy)
10 6 Journal, 1853 revision (photocopy)
10 7 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 8 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 9 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 10 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 11 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 12 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 13 John Tucker Scott family letters from the Oregon Trail
1852
10 14 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 15 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 16 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 17 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 18 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 19 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 20 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 21 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 22 Agreements re: the book Covered Wagon Women. Vol. 8, pp. 39-172 (Kenneth Holmes & Robert Clarke) 1986
10 23 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 24 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 25 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 26 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 27 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 28 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 29 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 30 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 31 Typed copy of Abigail Scott Duniway's journal
10 32 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 33 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 34 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 35 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 36 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 37 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 38 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 39 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 40 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 41 Covered Wagon Women Galley Proofs
10 42 Covered Wagon Women Sales & Tallies
10 43 Covered Wagon Women Sales & Tallies
10 44 Covered Wagon Women Sales & Tallies
10 45 Covered Wagon Women Sales & Tallies
10 46 Covered Wagon Women Sales & Tallies

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Series V:  Literary Works by Abigail Scott Duniway (arranged by date)
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
11 1 Poem: "The Burning Forest Tree," (Reprinted n 1904) 1854
11 2 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick, 1859-[photocopy]. [This copy is of poor quality and incomplete]
11 3 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 4 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 5 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 6 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 7 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 8 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 9 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 10 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 11 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 12 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 13 Novel: Captain Gray's Company. Portland, Oregon: S.J. McCormick
1859
11 14 Story: "Eliphalet's Girl" 1875
11 15 Story: "Eliphalet's Girl" 1875
11 16 Story: "Eliphalet's Girl" 1875
11 17 Story: "Eliphalet's Girl" 1875
11 18 Poem: "My Musings" 1875
11 19 Poem: "My Musings" 1875
11 20 Poem: "My Musings" 1875
11 21 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 22 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 23 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 24 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 25 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 26 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 27 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 28 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 29 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 30 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 31 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 32 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 33 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 34 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 35 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 36 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 37 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 38 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 39 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 40 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 41 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 42 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 43 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 44 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 45 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 46 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 47 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 48 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 49 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 50 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 51 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 52 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 53 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 54 Story: "Ethel Graeme's Destiny" 1880
11 55 Poem: "Forest Grove" 1880
11 56 Poem: "David and Anna Matson" [several illustrations only] 1881
11 57 Poem: "May I? Shall I? Will You?" 1885
11 58 Poem: "Eternity Rolls Back Its Scroll" 1889
12 1 Serial, "Coming Century"
1891
12 2 Serial, "Coming Century"
1891
12 3 Address at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois 1893
12 4 Address at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois 1893
12 5 Address at the Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois 1893
12 6 Story: "Sawtooth Trail" 1896
12 7 Story: "Sawtooth Trail" 1896
12 8 Story: "Sawtooth Trail" 1896
12 9 Story: "Sawtooth Trail" 1896
12 10 Poem: "Alone" 1897
12 11 Poem: "To the Memory of Mr. J.C. Card" [?] 1898
12 12 "Memories" (poems & pictures of Christmas) 1899
12 13 Address to Women's Club 1902
12 14 "How I Became a Literary Woman." Western Lady 1904
12 15 Poem: "Centennial" 1905
12 16 "Oregon: Land of Promise." Portland, Oregon: Claiborne Rhodes 1907
12 17 "Oregon: Land of Promise." Portland, Oregon: Claiborne Rhodes 1907
12 18 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 19 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 20 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 21 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 22 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 23 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 24 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 25 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 26 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 27 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 28 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 29 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 30 Novel: Blanche Le Clerq 1908
12 31 Poem: "Ten Times Ten Thousand More" 1912
12 32 Address to Federation of Labor 1914
12 33 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 34 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 35 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 36 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 37 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 38 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 39 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 40 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 41 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 42 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 43 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 44 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 45 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 46 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 47 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 48 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 49 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 50 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 51 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
12 52 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Uncorrected copy 1914
13 1 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 2 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 3 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 4 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 5 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 6 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 7 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 8 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 9 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 10 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 11 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 12 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 13 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 14 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 15 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 16 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 17 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 18 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 19 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
13 20 Novel: Margaret Rudson. Final copy 1914
14 1 Speech October 1915
14 2 Poem: "The Gathering Stars" (incomplete) undated
14 3 Story: "Experience and Vision." undated
14 4 Story: "Experience and Vision." undated
14 5 Story: "Gretchie." original copy undated
14 6 Story: "Gretchie." original copy undated
14 7 Story: "Gretchie." original copy undated
14 8 Story: "Gretchie." original copy undated
14 9 Story: "Gretchie." original copy undated
14 10 Story: "Gretchie." photocopy undated
14 11 Story: "Gretchie." photocopy undated
14 12 Notes undated

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Series VI:  Literary Works by Others
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
15 1 Chancey, William Henrey. Horoscope of Abigail Scott Duniway 1897
15 2 Cook, Frances Scott. Reminiscences 1852
15 3 Duniway, Clyde A. "My Memories of Abigail Scott Duniway" 1929
15 4 Duniway, Clyde A. "My Memories of Abigail Scott Duniway" 1929
15 5 Duniway, Clyde A. "My Memories of Abigail Scott Duniway" 1929
15 6 Duniway, Clyde A. "My Memories of Abigail Scott Duniway" 1929
15 7 Fernside, Margaret. Poems dedicated to Abigail Scott Duniway (Photostats) October 25, 1862
15 8 McCormac, Alice. Resolutions of the Oregon Equal Suffrage States Association 1898
15 9 Mood, Fulmer. "An Astrologer From Down East" 1932
15 10 Palmer, Harriet Scott. Reminiscence 1852. 1925
15 11 Palmer, Harriet Scott. Reminiscence 1852. 1925
15 12 West, Oswald. Speech: "How and When Woman Suffrage Came to Oregon." undated

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Series VII:  Family records
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
16 1 Public Records re: Abigail Scott Duniway and Benjamin C. Duniway 1853-1912
16 2 Public Records re: Abigail Scott Duniway and Benjamin C. Duniway 1853-1912
16 3 Public Records re: Abigail Scott Duniway and Benjamin C. Duniway 1853-1912
16 4 Public Records re: Abigail Scott Duniway and Benjamin C. Duniway 1853-1912
16 5 Miscellaneous 1882-1925
16 6 Miscellaneous 1882-1925
16 7 Deed and Abstracts for House at 5th and Clay. Portland, OR 1883
16 8 Deed and Abstracts for House at 5th and Clay. Portland, OR 1883
16 9 Copyright notices for: "The Hidden Motive" (1892); "Shack Locks" (1896)
16 10 Deeds and Agreements with sons 1893
16 11 Deeds and Agreements with sons 1893
16 12 Deeds and Agreements with sons 1893
16 13 Deeds and Agreements with sons 1893
16 14 Deeds and Agreements with sons 1893
17 1 Record of Subscribers of "Coronation of Womanhood"
17 2 Trust of Duniway Boys for Abigail Scott Duniway & After 1893-1919

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Series VIII:  Biographical Information
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
18 1 Biographical note: Alice Duniway to Clyde Duniway 1932
18 2 Biographical note: Emma I. Greene Taylor undated
18 3 Memorial Service for Abigail Scott Duniway. Letters to Oswald West 1915
18 4 Memorial Service for Abigail Scott Duniway. Letters to Oswald West 1915
18 5 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 6 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 7 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 8 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 9 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 10 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 11 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 12 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 13 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 14 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 15 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 16 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 17 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 18 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 19 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 20 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 21 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 22 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 23 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 24 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 25 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 26 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 27 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 28 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 29 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 30 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 31 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 32 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 33 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 34 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 35 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 36 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 37 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 38 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 39 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 40 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 41 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 42 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 43 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 44 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
18 45 Newspaper clippings about Duniway family in Idaho, "Wood River Times" photoprints
18 46 Newspaper clippings about Duniway family in Idaho, "Wood River Times" photoprints
18 47 Newspaper clippings about Duniway family in Idaho, "Wood River Times" photoprints
18 48 Newspaper clippings about Duniway family in Idaho, "Wood River Times" photoprints
18 49 Newspaper clippings about Duniway family in Idaho, "Wood River Times" photoprints
18 50 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 1 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 2 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 3 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 4 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 5 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 6 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 7 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 8 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 9 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 10 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 11 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 12 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 13 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 14 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 15 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 16 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 17 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 18 Obituaries on Abigail Scott Duniway
19 19 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 20 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 21 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 22 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 23 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 24 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 25 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
19 26 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
19 27 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
19 28 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
19 29 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
19 30 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written prior to her death)
19 31 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 32 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 33 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 34 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 35 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 36 Feature stories on Abigail Scott Duniway (written after her death)
19 37 Articles, programs (after 1915)
19 38 Articles, programs (after 1915)
19 39 Articles, programs (after 1915)
19 40 Articles, programs (after 1915)
19 41 Articles, programs (after 1915)
19 42 Articles, programs (after 1915)
19 43 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway Middle School, McMinnville, Oregon 1992
19 44 Newspaper clippings about Abigail Scott Duniway Middle School, McMinnville, Oregon 1992
19 45 Radio Program: Talk by Bertha Singer. KFJR, Portland, Oregon. (factual) November 14, 1933
19 46 Radio Program: Talk by David Duniway. "Rights of Women." KDAC, Portland, Oregon. (factual) December 3, 1948
19 47 Radio Program: DuPont scripts of Abigail Scott Duniway (fiction)
19 48 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)
20 1 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)
20 2 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)
20 3 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)
20 4 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)
20 5 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)
20 6 Radio Program: DuPont scripts on Abigail Scott Duniway (fictional)

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Series IX:  Miscellany
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
21 1 Spirit Messages from Clara (daughter) February 1886
21 2 Autographs
21 3 Coronation of Womanhood (photocopies)
21 4 Coronation of Womanhood (photocopies)
21 5 Suffrage Prints (May Wright Levall & B.D. Flower, no date)
21 6 Releases for rights regarding use of Abigail Scott Duniway's personal papers
21 7 Releases for rights regarding use of Abigail Scott Duniway's personal papers
21 8 Steven Don Beckham, for Oregon Council of Teachers of English 1992
21 9 Steven Don Beckham, for Oregon Council of Teachers of English 1992
21 10 Documentary: "Hearts & Hands" a film by Pat Ferrrero (pamphlets & articles)
21 11 Documentary: "Hearts & Hands" a film by Pat Ferrrero (pamphlets & articles)
21 12 Documentary: "Hearts & Hands" a film by Pat Ferrrero (pamphlets & articles)
21 13 Letters re: Abigail Scott Duniway Elementary School, Portland, Oregon 1920-1921
22 1 Plaque: WHO Award to Abigail Scott Duniway

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Series X:  Scrapbooks
Container(s)
Description
Box
23 News Clippings: Volume 1
24 News Clippings: Volume 2

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Series XI:  Oversize
Container(s)
Description
Dates
Box
Folder
25 1 Acreage Maps of Willamette Meridian, Oregon (3)
25 2 Map of Clackamas County
25 3 Warrant Deed and Land Deed
25 4 Gretchie by Abigail Scott Duniway, Galley pages 1-3
25 5 Gretchie by Abigail Scott Duniway, Galley pages 4 & 5
25 6 Suffrage Hymn 1912
25 7 Letters 1900 & 1907
25 8 The New Northwest January 29-May 7, 1875
25 9 The New Northwest January 21-28, 1886
25 10 The Morning Oregonian February 5, 1895
25 11 Miscellaneous newspaper clippings 1886-1898
25 12 The Morning Oregonian February 15, 1899
25 13 The Women's Tribune October 28, 1905
25 14 Miscellaneous: The Sunday Oregonian & The Morning Oregonian May 3, 1901-February 15, 1913
25 15 The Sunday Oregonian February 4, 1945
25 16 Miscellaneous newspaper clippings 1910-1971

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Subjects

  • Personal Names :
  • Catt, Carrie Chapman, 1859-1947
  • DeVoe, Emma Smith, 1858-1927
  • Duniway, Abigail Scott, 1834-1915
  • Duniway, C.A. (Clyde Augustus), 1866-1944
  • Subject Terms :
  • Oregon National Historic Trail
  • Suffragists--Oregon
  • Women--Suffrage--Oregon
    • Form or Genre Terms :
    • Manuscripts for publication
    • Overland journals

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