Guide to the USU student folklore genre collection of legends: etiological,
1960-2011

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Overview of the Collection

Creator: Fife Folklore Archives
Title: USU student folklore genre collection of etiological legends
Dates: 1960-2011 ( inclusive )
Quantity: ca. 750 items
Collection Number: USU_FOLK COLL 8a_Group 7: Etiological Legends
Summary: Legends collected by undergraduate students in USU (1960s to present) and BYU (1960 to 1978) folklore classes. Collected primarily in Utah, the items focus principally on folklore of the Western U.S.
Repository: Utah State University. Merrill-Cazier Library. Special Collections and Archives
Fife Folklore Archives

Merrill-Cazier Library
Utah State University
3000 Old Main Hill
Logan, UT 84322-3000
Phone: 435 797-2663
Fax: 435 797-2880
Email: scweb@usu.edu

Languages: Collection materials are in English. 
Sponsor: Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant, 2007-2008

Historical Note

The Fife Folklore Archives Student Folklore Genre Collection consists of folklore items collected by undergraduate students in Utah State University folklore classes from the late 1960s to the present and folklore items collected by undergraduate students in Brigham Young University folklore and anthropology classes during 1960-1978. Most items include informant data, context, text (the folklore item), texture (stylistic notation), and collector data. The items of folklore are in text form on 8 ½ x 11 sheets of line-free paper. Since, 1999 genre items also include release forms. The materials do not circulate. The collection is separated into nine groups:

  • Group 1: customs (foodways)
  • Group 2: belief
  • Group 3: speech
  • Group 4: tales and jokes
  • Group 5: songs
  • Group 6: games and pranks
  • Group 7: legends: character, contemporary, etiological, human condition, supernatural non-religious and supernatural religious
  • Group 8: material culture
  • Group 9: e-lore: electronically transmitted folklore (Xerox, facsimile and e-mail)

In the late 1960s, folklore courses were first taught at USU by Professor Austin Fife. At this time, Fife (a French professor) had his students collect items of folklore on pre-printed index cards. The information on the cards has now been transferred to 8 ½ x 11 sheets of paper and the items have been added to the genre collection. At about the same time (1967) at Brigham Young University (BYU) in Provo, Utah, Professor William A. Wilson began teaching folklore classes. Wilson had his students collect folklore using both genre collections and major project (focused) collections. The genre items were separated and filed by genre. Also included in the BYU genre collection were items from two other BYU professors who had their students collect folklore: John Sorenson and Thomas Cheney. The student collections from Sorenson and Cheney were given to Wilson and he added them to the genre collection along with his students' work. On these items, in the upper right hand corner above all other information, Wilson noted "SC" for Sorenson Collection and "CC" for Cheney Collection.

In 1978, William A. Wilson left Brigham Young University to direct the newly established Folklore Program and Folklore Archives at Utah State University. Wilson brought to USU the student genre collection that he had amassed at BYU, with a copy of the genre collection remaining at the BYU library. At the USU folklore archives (later named the Fife Folklore Archives for Austin and Alta Fife), William A. Wilson and Barbara [Garrett] [Walker] Lloyd used the already sorted BYU materials when creating the collection classification system. This classification system, with its roots in the Finnish archive tradition, is still used at the Fife Folklore Archives.

Wilson was at USU until 1985 when he returned to BYU to head the English Department. However, the BYU administration gave him a year's leave of absence to copy all the student materials in the Fife Folklore Archives at USU and bring them with him to BYU. Wilson notes: "Hannele [wife] and I practically lived in the USU archive. Max [Peterson, Director of the Merrill Library] brought a copy machine into the archive, and we copied day after day. First we copied the entire BYU genre collection. Then we copied all the items in the accumulated genre piles [of USU items]." Thus, in 1985 the BYU and USU folklore genre and focused collections were identical. During the following years, William A. Wilson and later Kristi Bell at BYU's Folklore Archives (now named the William A. Wilson Folklore Archives) and Barbara [Garrett] [Walker] Lloyd and later Randy Williams at the Fife Folklore Archives at USU worked to maintain the same classification system at both universities' folklore archives. However, the materials submitted by students from the two universities began, of course, to differ from each other, as students generally collect the kinds of materials their professors talk about in class.

In 1985 Professor Barre Toelken came to USU (from the University of Oregon) to direct the Folklore Program. He continued the folklore-collecting legacy that Austin Fife and William A. Wilson began. Over the years Professors Steve Siporin, Patricia Gardner, Jan Roush, Jeannie Thomas, Lisa Gabbert and Lynne McNeill and instructors Barbara [Garrett] [Walker] Lloyd, Randy Williams, and Michael Christensen (and others) have all had their students collect and deposit folklore items to the Fife Folklore Archives. And thus, the USU Student Genre Collection continues to grow. The format has changed somewhat over the years to reflect the trends in folkloristics. As stated above, many of the early submissions had little contextual data, and often limited, if any, informant data. William A. Wilson created a collecting format that included: informant data, contextual data, and text (item of folklore). Barre Toelken and Randy Williams added "texture" to the format of genre collections, allowing the collector to give "the feel" of the item to potential researchers. In in 1998, students were asked to include release forms with their genre items, following a trend in the folklore field that addresses not only the item (which in some cases, like a joke, may been seen as part of the public domain materials and therefore not needing a release) but also the performance of the lore (and therefore necessary for a release from the performer informant).In 2002, the collection was moved from hundreds of three-ringed binders to archival folders and boxes, making the collection more physically stable and easier to manage and use. In 2003, the collection finding aids were encoded in HTML as a means of hosting them on-line for greater research accessibility. In 2012, the finding aids were hosted in EAD.

Content Description

The USU Student Folklore Genre Collection: Group 7: Etiological Legends consists of approximately 750 individual items of legends collected by undergraduate students. Most items include informant, context, text (the folklore item), texture (stylistic notation), and collector data.

  • Celestial Phenomena and Meteorological Events
  • Origin of Earth and Geographic Features
  • Origin of Animals/Animal Characteristics
  • Origin of People/Human Characteristics
  • Origin of Plants
  • Origin of Beliefs
  • Origin of Customs
  • Place Names
  • Other Names
  • Origin of Products, Items, Objects

Forms one of nine subgroups in the Utah State University student genre collection, housed in the Fife Folklore Archives. Guide to folklore collecting assignments.

Use of the Collection

Restrictions on Access :  Restrictions

Open to public research. To access the collection a patron must have the following information: collection number, series number, sub-series number, if applicable, box number and folder number (or image number).

Restrictions on Use :  Copyright

It is the responsibility of the user to obtain permission to publish from the owner of the copyright (the institution, the creator of the record, the author or his/her transferees, heirs, legates, or literary executors). The user agrees to indemnify and hold harmless the Utah State University Libraries, its officers, employees, and agents from and against all claims made by any person asserting that he or she is an owner of copyright.

Patrons must sign and comply with the USU Special Collections and Archives Use Agreement and Reproduction Order form as well as any restrictions placed by the collector or informant(s).

Permission to publish material from the USU student folklore genre collection legends must be obtained from the Curator of the Fife Folklore Archives and/or the Special Collections Department Head.

Preferred Citation :  

USU Student Folklore Genre collection: Etiological Legends, 1960-2011. (FOLK COLL 8a: Group 7, box, folder). Utah State University. Special Collections and Archives Department.

Administrative Information

Arrangement :

Arrangement: topical.

Acquisition Information :  

The items in the Student Folklore Genre Collection were collected by USU and BYU students in folklore and anthropology classes as part of course requirements and deposited in the Fife Folklore Archives by the instructor. Duplicates of BYU student items are housed at BYU's William A. Wilson Folklore Archives. The materials in Group 7: Legends (including character, contemporary, etiological, human condition, supernatural non-religious, and supernatural religious legends) cover the period from approximately 1960 to the present. The collection was created in 1978 by William A. Wilson and Barbara [Garrett] [Walker] Lloyd.

Processing Note :  

Originally processed by Barbara [Garrett] [Walker] Lloyd and William A. Wilson and updated over the years by Fife Folklore Archives staff. Most recently updated by Nicole Cornwall, 2012. Finding aid created by Randy Williams and Tricia Harrison, 2002; updated by Randy Williams, March 2012.


Detailed Description of the Collection

5:  Etiological Legends
Container(s)
Description
5.1: Celestial Phenomena and Meteorological Events
Box
Folder
17 1 5.1.1: Sun
Box
Folder
17 1 5.1.1.1 : Tane, a warrior, catches the sun and forces him to go slower, making the day 24 hours long
.1 (item)
17 1 5.1.1.2 : Maui, Hawaiian demigod, catches the sun and forces him to go more slowly, providing his parents more time to get their work done
.1 (item)
17 1 5.1.1.3 : Indians send out a rabbit that shoots down the sun to talk to him and make him stay out longer
.1 (item)
17 1 5.1.1.4 : Amateras-Ohmirami, the sun, hides behind a rock until the other gods trick her into coming out
.1 (item)
17 1 5.1.1.5 : A hero shoots down nine suns leaving only one to circle the earth
.1 (item)
17 2 5.1.2: Moon
Box
Folder
17 2 5.1.2.1 : A young chieftain's bride dies but he sees her in the evening in the pale moon
.1 (item)
17 2 5.1.2.2 : The moon was jealous of the sun, so as a punishment, it was made smaller and less bright
.1 (item)
17 2 5.1.2.3 : Moon is chased by her old suitor, the Sun
.1 (item)
17 2 5.1.2.4 : How the Moon keeps warm
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3: Stars
Box
Folder
17 3 5.1.3.1 : Indian wives leave husbands because of onions and climb rope into the sky and become the constellation of "Taurus."
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.2 : Eight Indian sons dance and ascend into the sky; one decides to return but trips and is killed. The remaining seven form the "Big Dipper."
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.3 : Badger cuts out stars and coyote throws them into the sky forming the "Milky Way."
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.4 : Pale Moon, because of her purity, is transformed into the evening star as a light for others to follow
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.5 : Seven children walk away from their drinking, unkind mother and turn into the "Little Dipper."
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.6 : Father Sky will not let his daughter stay on earth with an Indian boy, hurls them up into the sky where they can be seen as Star Maiden and her lover
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.7 : Seven sons of the creator want to be immortal, decide to turn into stars because they are always there; they form the Big Dipper
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.8 : An Indian climbs too high up a mountain to come down again, so his father turns him into the North Star, and because he sits on the edge of a cliff, the North Star never moves
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.9 : Herdboy and Weaver Princess are stars that are punished to circle on another until each July 7 when they meet
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.10 : A little girl is rewarded for kind deeds by her little dipper changing into heavenly stars
.1 (item)
17 3 5.1.3.11 : An old prospector lost flour, sugar and coffee which became the "Milky Way"
.1 (item)
17 4 5.1.4: Wind
Box
Folder
17 4 5.1.4.1 : Hawaiians believed that when the wind shifts from its normal pattern, King Kamehameha is mad
.1 (item)
17 4 5.1.4.2 : The Chinook wind got its name from a beautiful Indian maiden who was lost; when the warrior felt a warm breeze, they said it was her breath
.1 (item)
5.2: Origin of Earth and Geographic Features
Box
Folder
17 5 5.2.1: Creation of Earth
Box
Folder
17 5 5.2.1.1 : The Insect people leave their newly created world and fly to the human world above them
.1 (item)
17 5 5.2.1.2 : The star gods fought with the moon god, and the moon god's blood drops become the Japanese Islands
.1 (item)
17 5 5.2.1.3 : An Indian keeps sending out a coyote to survey the world until he is sure that the creation is finished
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2: Mountains
Box
Folder
17 6 5.2.2.1 : An Indian prince and his girlfriend who died become the mountains Poxpocatepetl [Popocatepetl] and Ixtatcyeatl
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.2 : Vertical ridges on Hawaiian Mountains were formed by huge canoes
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.3 : Chief of water and chief of mountain fight over king's daughter
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.4 : Sand dunes created by Pacific wind blowing sand
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.5 : Mount Timpanogos
.51 (items)
17 6 5.2.2.6 : Earth does not become completely flat again after returning from talking to the sky, this is why there are hills and mountains
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.7 : Dinosaurs fall asleep in Utah, are covered up with dirt and rocks and come to form mountains
.2 (items)
17 6 5.2.2.8: Teton Mountain Range was formed by an Indian as mounds in memory of his parents and sister who were killed by a bear
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.9 : Algonquin Indians believe that the Ramapo Mountains were formed by Manitou who dropped rocks from his apron
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.10 : Algonquins believe that the Palisades and the Hudson Highlands were built by Manitou to keep in the wicked beings, but they escaped
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.11 : An Eskimo wife waits by the sea for her husband; she is covered with snow and turns into Mount Susitna (The Sleeping Lady) near Cook Inlet, Alaska
.3 (items)
17 6 5.2.2.12 : An Eskimo princess waits for her husband who never returns; after her death, the Gods turn her into the "Sleeping Princess Mountain," a part of the Talkeetna mountain range in Alaska
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.13 : Big Rock Candy Mountain came into existence after a good witch let boil over a magical brew of candy which covered and coated the mountain
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.14 : Devil's Slide was formed when Satan was kicked out of heaven and slid down to hell
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.15 : Sleeping Giant Mountain on Kauai was formed by the death of a giant
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.16: Squaws murdered and the braves' grief was so great that Squaw Butte was formed
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.17 : Squaw Peak was formed when an Indian maiden died so she could be with her lover
.3 (items)
17 6 5.2.2.18 : An Indian princess becomes the face of the mountain rather than marry someone she didn't love
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.19 : Squaw kills herself over dead lover; this stains the cliffs red
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.20 : Sleeping Mother bear awaits cubs and forms dunes
.1 (item)
17 6 5.2.2.21 : Thunder in the Hudson Highlands is cause by Henry Hudson playing tenpins
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3: Rocks
Box
Folder
17 7 5.2.3.1 : A Paiute brave jumps from a rock because of love for a Ute girl; the rock took the form of a broken heart
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.2 : A lady picked seaweed too long and turned into a rock
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.3 : When Christ was crucified, little men cried tears that turned into crosses
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.4 : Two luck rocks grow into big rocks when a young boy cuts his hair with them
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.5 : A man and a woman, who committed adultery, were turned into stone and pushed off the path, but the image reappears every year
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.6 : Tear drops which turn to stone; origin of the Apache Tears
.5 (items)
17 7 5.2.3.7 : Woman waiting on the shore for her husband, who is really her brother, turns into the Forever Stone in the Gulf of Ca Mau, Vietnam
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.8 : A brave Indian saves a princess from a bear with the help of a magic stone which grows into a large rock, Devil's Tower
.6 (items)
17 7 5.2.3.9 : An eyehole in the ridge of Weber Canyon is where the devil tied a string to make a yo-yo out of the world
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.10 : Rocky Peak on top of Lone Ridge was piled up by citizens of Laketown in order to hide the bodies of killed Indians
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.11 : Nun punished for falling in love and turned into stone "The Kneeling Nun"
.2 (items)
17 7 5.2.3.12 : Origin of Paul Bunyan and other rock formations
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.13 : G-Hill Princess refuses to leave Gunnison and died on her hill; a boulder honors her memory
.1 (item)
17 7 5.2.3.14 : Rock formations of an Indian mother and her child enter cave
.5 (items)
17 7 5.2.3.15 : Natural bridge formed by two warring brothers
.1 (item)
17 8 5.2.4: Oceans, Rivers, Lakes
Box
Folder
17 8 5.2.4.1 : A good Indian using holy water destroys his enemy when the holy water turns into a lake
.1 (item)
17 8 5.2.4.2 : A princess cries a lake over the loss of her lover and drowns in it
.2 (items)
17 8 5.2.4.3 : Tequendama, the God, split a mountain to save his people from a great flood; the split formed the great waterfall
.1 (item)
17 8 5.2.4.4 : Bear Lake was formed by tears from the Great Bear
.1 (item)
17 8 5.2.4.5 : An Indian maiden sacrificed herself to the God's and her face can be seen behind Multnomah Falls
.2 (items)
17 8 5.2.4.6 : An Indian Princess was killed and nature honored her by placing a bridal veil over a cliff
.3 (items)
17 8 5.2.4.7 : A tragic lover killed herself, which turned part of a lake red
.1 (item)
17 9 5.2.5: Canyons
Box
Folder
17 9 5.2.5.1 : A medicine man turns into a big serpent and causes the formation of Iguazu canyon in order to prevent an Indian princess and her lover from running away
.1 (item)
17 9 5.2.5.2 : Thistle Canyon was formed by a giant who fell and died
.1 (item)
17 9 5.2.5.3: Sardine Canyon was named after someone found a sardine tin along the stream that flows next to it.
.1 (item)
17 10 5.2.6: Countries, Cities, Islands
Box
Folder
17 10 5.2.6.1 : When a goddess is plowing part of Sweden, a chunk of earth (the city of Copenhagen) is broken off
.1 (item)
17 10 5.2.6.2 : Maui casts his net into the ocean and pulls up islands like Polynesia, Tahiti, New Zealand, and the Hawaiian chain
.1 (item)
17 10 5.2.6.3 : Yellowstone earned its name after a large Indian tribe took a bathroom break together
.1 (item)
5.3: Origin of Animals or Animal Characteristics
Box
Folder
17 11 5.3.1: Fish and Sea Animals
Box
Folder
17 11 5.3.1.1 : A mother and daughter jump into the sea; the mother becomes a turtle and the daughter a shark
.2 (items)
17 11 5.3.1.2 : Kingfisher wear a War-Bonnet because the Napa made him angry
.1 (item)
17 11 5.3.1.3 : When frogs croak they're really saying, "I'm in trouble!"
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2: Land Animals
Box
Folder
17 12 5.3.2.1 : The donkey is a protected, sacred animal among the Indians because Christ rode on a donkey once
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.2 : A horn snake eats people and then disappears
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.3 : The coyote kills two deer which ate fruit from the coyote's tree
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.4 : The coyote steals food from an Indian, but is thrown into the fire and burns his paws. Because of that, he howls and licks his feet
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.5 : The monkey is afraid of the revenge of the wild cat, that is why he lives in trees
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.6 : A dog gets angry about a cat because the cat loses the magic amber of their master; that is why they are not friends
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.7 : Unicorns were wiped out because Noah did not load a pair of them on his ark
.2 (items)
17 12 5.3.2.8 : Opossum burnt off the hair from his tail trying to turn it black
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.9 : Wicked people killed a helpful giant spider and were cursed with black evil spiders
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.10 : The King of Cats has god-like powers and is immortal
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.11 : Pandas received their coloring by rubbing soot on each other during mourning
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.12 : How Coyotes became bad luck
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.13 : Why the Minx Cat has a squashed face
.1 (item)
17 12 5.3.2.14 : Tabby cats have a "M" on their face as a reward from Mary for keeping baby Jesus warm
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3: Birds
Box
Folder
17 13 5.3.3.1 : The birds were painting themselves, but the crow slept too long, so when he got there, there was only black paint remaining
.2 (items)
17 13 5.3.3.2 : The ring around the a loon's neck is the beads that were tossed into the water by a dying Indian
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3.3 : Crow cheated in a contest and now says, "Caw, Caw" as punishment
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3.4 : Robin fanned the fire to keep baby Jesus warm and burnt his chest
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3.5 : How butterflies received their color
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3.6 : The Great Spirit taught bird to sing to make the world less lonely
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3.7 : Why Pelican have a large beak
.1 (item)
17 13 5.3.3.8 : Parrots are green as a punishment for eating all a farmer's mangos
.1 (item)
5.4: Origin of People or Human Characteristics
Box
Folder
17 14 5.4.1: Creation of Races or Nations
Box
Folder
17 14 5.4.1.1 : Creation of the Miztec kingdom after a great flood
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.2 : A king and queen gave birth to one hundred eggs which developed into people who populated the earth
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.3 : The Paiute Indians originate from a tribe of giants who almost became extinct as punishment for treating a crippled child badly
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.4 : The Digger, Washoe, and Paiute were created by the wolf, coyote, jack rabbit, sage hen, lizard, and yellow hammer. The humans received the hand of the lizard
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.5 : God created blacks by over baking, whites by under baking, and Indians by baking man just right
.5 (items)
17 14 5.4.1.6 : At first, all men were black, so God made a white bath so the people could become white; some people were late, so only the palms of their hands and soles of their feet are white
.2 (items)
17 14 5.4.1.7 : Navajos believed that there were originally twelve tribes; one tribe got lost, but returned as the Mormon people
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.8 : The Navajos believe that they came across the great water in a bamboo tube
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.9 : Abraham was fed by Gabriel the angel to save his life because a king had decreed all male children be slain
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.10 : Aryan nation started by a man with unrealistic projections
.1 (item)
17 14 5.4.1.11 : Coyote accidentally scatters the Maker's sticks which becomes the people of the world
.1 (item)
17 15 5.4.2: Creation of Man and Woman
Box
Folder
17 15 5.4.2.1 : The first man and woman left the presence of the Great White Spirit without permission and had to live away from him forever
.1 (item)
17 15 5.4.2.2 : Satan tried to complete one of God's men but failed; the result was woman
.1 (item)
17 15 5.4.2.3 : Men and women started as one circle, were broken and now search for their missing half
.1 (item)
17 15 5.4.2.4 : Bear eats garlic and grass for 30-40 days and turns into a woman and starts the human race
.1 (item)
17 16 5.4.3: Human Characteristics and Traits
Box
Folder
17 16 5.4.3.1 : The Tongan stopped being cannibalistic because they feared the spirits of the dead would molest them
.1 (item)
17 16 5.4.3.2 : A Russian woman started wearing a veil to hide a kiss mark she received while her husband was away
.1 (item)
17 16 5.4.3.3 : Men have bulging throats because when Adam ate the apple in the Garden of Eden, he couldn’t swallow it, but rather it got caught in his throat
.1 (item)
17 16 5.4.3.4 : "Outtie" belly buttons are the sign that the babies were not yet ready to be sent out
.1 (item)
17 17 5.4.4: Creation of Individuals
Box
Folder
17 17 5.4.4.1 : Navajo legend about Changing Woman, the daughter of Earth and Sky, who is taken care of by First Man and Woman
.1 (item)
5.5: Origin of Plants
Box
Folder
17 18 5.5.1: Flowers
Box
Folder
17 18 5.5.1.1 : The hibiscus has a dark red spot because a fairy jabbed her finger while sewing in the center
.1 (item)
17 18 5.5.1.2 : Forget-me-not flowers grow where a hawk stopped an Indian from drinking poisoned water
.1 (item)
17 18 5.5.1.3 : Warrior pulls flower in half, gives one piece to a princess as a sign that he will return; but he never does, and so the naupaka plant has only half a blossom
.1 (item)
17 18 5.5.1.4 : God is moved by and transforms the girls’ blue bonnets into flowers so that they will never be forgotten
.2 (items)
17 18 5.5.1.5 : Indian paint brush stained by blood of murdered Indian woman
.1 (item)
17 18 5.5.1.6 : Indian paint brush used when Indians painted themselves for war
.1 (item)
17 18 5.5.1.7 : Narcissus fell in love with his own image and became a flower
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2: Trees
Box
Folder
17 19 5.5.2.1 : A tree grows where a young girl killed herself out of grief for her dead brother; the tree leaves fall because she cries for her brother, and the leaves are red because of the spilt blood of the innocent boy
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.2 : Christ makes the dogwood tree grow smaller so that it can never again be used to make crosses; he also causes the blossoms to have the form of the cross, with a crown of thorns in the center
.7 (items)
17 19 5.5.2.3 : A stick thrown away by a man becomes a cottonwood tree
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.4 : Trees change color in the fall to make the world bright again
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.5 : Quaking Aspens quake because of the role they played in Jesus's death
.2 (items)
17 19 5.5.2.6 : All trees and shrubs killed leaving a lone bristlecone tree
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.7 : Trees are in groves because they dance and sing together at night
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.8 : Pioneers carried Box Elder Trees across the plains
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.9 : Pine cones have a tiny handprint inside because a pine tree sheltered baby Jesus
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.10 : Origin of Trees around the Logan temple
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.11 : In the fall one grove turns a red heart shape to honor tragic lovers
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.12 : Why Pine Trees have Needles
.1 (item)
17 19 5.5.2.13 : The Widow Maker tree
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3: Edible Plants
Box
Folder
17 20 5.5.3.1 : A princess’ lover was killed, so his head was buried, and a tree grew where it was buried. Coconuts were the fruit of the tree to remind the princess of his face
.3 (items)
17 20 5.5.3.2 : God sent a starving people a rainbow. One man walked across the rainbow and brought back rice
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3.3 : A plant grew where a king's son had been buried. The king named the plant "Kava" after his son and made a beverage from the plant
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3.4 : A kava plant grew where a sacrificed girl had been buried; chief comes to use it at a ceremony after observing the plant's impact on a rat
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3.5 : King of Hawaii stole pineapples and planted them by apple trees to make them grow
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3.6 : Sego Lily was a gift from the Great Spirit to starving Indians
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3.7 : Indian princess apples were stained red by the blood of a slain princess
.1 (item)
17 20 5.5.3.8 : Selu the Mother of Corn
.1 (item)
5.6: Origin of Beliefs
Box
Folder
17 21 5.6.1: Christ
Box
Folder
17 21 5.6.1.1 : When Christ saw the wickedness of the people he cried a great flood of tears which made the Grand Canyon
.1 (item)
17 21 5.6.1.2 : Apaches believe the Christ appeared to them and that his foot prints are visible
.1 (item)
17 22 5.6.2: Gods
Box
Folder
17 22 5.6.2.1 : The coyote took the baby of the water which caused a great flood
.2 (items)
17 22 5.6.2.2 : Fire crackles because Loki, the fire god, is beating his children as punishment for the naughtiness
.1 (item)
17 22 5.6.2.3 : A great white god appeared to the Chigran Indians and teaches them how to live
.1 (item)
17 22 5.6.2.4 : A great "White Butterfly" visited the Navajos, taught them how to live, and gave signs of his return
.1 (item)
17 22 5.6.2.5 : Gods turn little girl into eagle to punish her scornful grandmother
.1 (item)
17 23 5.6.3: Spirits
Box
Folder
17 23 5.6.3.1 : The coyote took the baby of the water which caused a great flood
.1 (item)
17 23 5.6.3.2 : In an Indian town, the people believe that the spirits of wicked people haunt the town after sunset
.1 (item)
17 23 5.6.3.3 : Aztec given sign of where to build a city
.1 (item)
17 23 5.6.3.4 : Kakazbal, spirit of evil
.1 (item)
17 23 5.6.3.5 : Sacrifice a pizza to Big Wag, swimming God
.1 (item)
17 23 5.6.3.6 : The Celestial nymph's Hagoromo
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0: Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
17 24 5.6.0.1 : Those desiring strength and courage must climb a mountain where a great chief was buried by his son who then became a great chief
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0.2 : How a couple decides that if a dog pants on "Dog Tongue Day," it would be an indication of a short spring
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0.3 : Fountain of Youth
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0.4 : An Elf tells a little girl that four leaved clovers are lucky
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0.5 : Why putting a cowboy hat on a bed brings bad luck
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0.6 : Suicide rock (Salt Lake City)
.1 (item)
17 24 5.6.0.7 : Indians believe beaver brings luck
.1 (item)
5.7: Origin of Customs
Box
Folder
17 25 5.7.1: Dance
Box
Folder
17 25 5.7.1.1 : The San Juan Indians do a deer dance to honor the son of a virgin who turned into a deer
.1 (item)
17 25 5.7.1.2 : In a dream, a buffalo tells an Indian how to do a Sundance to cure the people of illness
.1 (item)
17 25 5.7.1.3 : A tribe of Indians sends out a brave to find a way to celebrate spring. The brave meets a bear that teaches him the Bear Dance
.2 (items)
17 26 5.7.2: Songs
Box
Folder
17 26 5.7.2.1 : The town drunk was accidentally thrown into a pit with the bodies of those who died from the black plague; when he awoke, he sang the Augustine Song
.1 (items)
17 27 5.7.3: Speech
Box
Folder
17 27 5.7.3.1 : The Spanish "Theta" sound originated from a king with a hair lip; the people copied his way of speech out of respect
.1 (item)
17 27 5.7.3.2 : Tikkit Tikki Tembo
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4: Origin of Holidays and Festivals
Box
Folder
17 28 5.7.4.1 : On April 1, 1572, Belgian and Dutch men beat their opponents in a religious war by means of tricking. This is why the day came to be April Fool's Day
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4.2 : Onam, an Indian harvest festival, marks the annual return of a King from the underworld
.2 (items)
17 28 5.7.4.3 : E moGee - The dragon snake
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4.4 : Symbolism of "Something old, Something new..." wedding custom
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4.5 : Origin of Valentine's Day
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4.6 : La Befana, the Christmas Witch (Italy)
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4.7 : April Fools
.1 (item)
17 28 5.7.4.8 : Halloween
.1 (item)
17 29 5.7.5: Origin of Holiday Customs
Box
Folder
17 29 5.7.5.1 : Jack-o-Lanterns are put out to light the way for a man who can go neither to heaven nor to hell
.1 (item)
17 29 5.7.5.2 : Christmas trees were first used by people in the Northlands in order to give them hope during winter time until the sun would return
.1 (item)
17 29 5.7.5.3 : Originally, the Christmas tree was decorated with a rainbow by God's angels. After an angel dropped and shattered the rainbow one year, they started to use the shimmering pieces for decoration
.1 (item)
17 29 5.7.5.4 : We hang tinsel on Christmas trees to celebrate the Christmas Spider
.1 (item)
17 29 5.7.5.5 : The Easter Bunny comes bring eggs so children know Spring has arrived
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0: Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
17 30 5.7.0.1 : A Japanese son was throwing his mother off a mountain because she was old. She broke tree branches on the way up so he would not get lost. Because of her kindness, he did not throw her off
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.2 : Sego lily becomes Utah state flower after a man who promised to find something beautiful in southern Utah produced the sego lily for his wife
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.3 : The custom to paint houses red in Sweden derives from the discovery that red copper dust protects the wood
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.4 : The habit of the English to drive on the left side of the road comes from a time when people found out that it is easier to defend oneself with the sword if walking on the left
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.5 : How Samoan kings got their names
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.6 : How Irish peasants started eating roast chicken
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.7: Origin of flowers on lapels
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.8 : High School Spirit Rocks
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.9 : Why Barber Poles are red and white
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.10 : Woods Cross Wildcats
.1 (item)
17 30 5.7.0.11 : Woman cuts the end off of a ham because her mother did
.1 (item)
5.8: Place Names
Box
Folder
18 1 5.8.1: Utah
Box
Folder
18 1 5.8.1.A1: Argyle Canyon
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.A2: Atoka
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B1: Birdseye
.2 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.B2: Bridal Veil Falls
.8 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.B3 : Boiler
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B4: Ballywats Canyon
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B5: Bear Lake
.2 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.B6 : Beer Flat
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B7 : Blacksmith Fork Canyon
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B8 : Blanding
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B9: Bogus Canyon
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B10 : Bottle Hollow
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.B11 : Beaver Mountain
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.C1 : Cache Valley
.3 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.C2 : Camp Red Cliff
.2 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.C3 : Crow Mountain
.2 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.C4 : Coonville
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.C5 : Cockcomb
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.C6 : Chocolate Peak
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.C7 : Camel Sock Corner
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.C8 : Castle Valley
.2 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.C9 : Coalville
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.C10 : Centerfield
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D1 : Deseret
.2 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.D2 : Dividend
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D3 : Draper
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D4 : Dip-N-Vat
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D5 : Dead Horse Point
.5 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.D6 : Dead Man's Corner (College Ward)
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D7 : Dead Man's Hollow
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D8 : Dead Man's Rock
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D9 : Devil's Slide
.6 (items)
18 1 5.8.1.D10 : Dead Man's Cave
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D11 : Duchesne
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D12 : Devil's Soup Bowl
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D13 : Dangling Rope
.1 (item)
18 1 5.8.1.D14 : Devil's Hand Mountain
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.E1 : Elberta
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.E2 : Emery
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.E3 : Eureka
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.E4 : Echo
.2 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.E5 : Erda
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.E6 : Eagle's Roost Canyon
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.F1 : Fairfield
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.F2 : Fountain Green
.2 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.F3 : Fairview
.2 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.F4 : Farr West (photos incl.)
.2 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.F5 : Fruitland
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.G1 : Goshen
.3 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.G2 : Grandpa's Hollow
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.G3 : Gravity Hill (Salt Lake City)
.2 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.H1 : Helper
.4 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.H2 : Hobble Creek Canyon
.3 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.H3 : Hurricane
.10 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.H4 : Hall's Cave
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.H5 : Honeyville
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.H6 : Happy Valley
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.J1 : Joe's Valley
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.J2 : Jail Rock
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.K1 : Kanab
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.K2 : Koosharem
.2 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.K3 : Kaysville
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.L1 : Layton
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.L2 : Levan
.5 (items)
18 2 5.8.1.L3 : Loa
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.L4 : Liberty
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.L5 : Lewiston
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.L6 : Lightning Ridge
.1 (item)
18 2 5.8.1.L7 : Lyman
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M1 : Magna
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.M2 : Mammoth
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.M3 : Marmalade District
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M4 : Midvale
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.M5 : Monument
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M6 : Moore
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M7 : Mosida
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M8 : Midway
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.M9 : Molly's Nibble/Nipple
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.M10 : Mantua
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.M11 : Minnie Maud
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M12 : Moab
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.M13 : Memorial Hill
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.N1 : Newton
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.N2 : Nine Mile
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.N3 : Nigger-Bill Canyon
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.N4 : Nephite Canal
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.O1 : Ophir
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.O2 : Orangeville
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.O3 : Orderville
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P1 : Paragonah
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P2 : Parowan
.4 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.P3 : Payson
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P4 : Peoa
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.P5 : Point of the Mountain
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P6 : Pond Town
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P7 : Provo
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P8 : Paradise
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.P9 : Plain City
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P10 : Pleasant Grove
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.P11 : Poison Creek
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P12 : Promise Rock
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.P13 : Providence
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.P14 : Pete McElprang Canyon
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.R1 : Riverton
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.R2 : Red Bridge
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.R3 : Roy
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S1 : Salem
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S2 : Sandy
.4 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S3 : Santaquin
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S4 : Soldier Summit
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S5 : Spanish Fork
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S6 : Spring City
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S7 : Sugarhouse
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S8 : Sardine Canyon
.8 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S9 : Shoot’em a Ring Canyon
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S10 : Squaw Peak
.3 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S11 : Swasey's Leap
.2 (items)
18 3 5.8.1.S12 : Spirit Lake
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S13 : Squaw Spring
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S14 : Sunset
.1 (item)
18 3 5.8.1.S15 : Squaw Cave
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T1 : Thead's Peak
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T2 : Thistle
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T3 : Tintic
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T4 : Tooele
.12 (items)
18 4 5.8.1.T5 : Toquerville
.3 (items)
18 4 5.8.1.T6 : Toronto's Cave
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T7 : Tub
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T8 : Trenton
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T9 : Tithing Hill
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.T10 : Tony's Grove
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.V1 : Vernal
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.V2 : Vernon
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.W1 : Woods Cross
.10 (items)
18 4 5.8.1.W2 : Walker's Flat Missing
0
18 4 5.8.1.W3 : Wellington
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.0 : Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
18 4 5.8.1.0.1 : Utah places named after the Swasey's
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.0.2 : Panguitch, Paragonah, Parowan
.1 (item)
18 4 5.8.1.0.3 : How did towns of area get their names?
.1 (item)
5.8.2: Other States
Box
Folder
18 5 5.8.2.1 : Alabama
Box
Folder
18 5 5.8.2.1.H1 : Horse Pen Forty
.1 (item)
18 6 5.8.2.2 : Alaska
Box
Folder
18 6 5.8.2.2.A1 : Anchorage
.1 (item)
18 6 5.8.2.2.K1 : Kachemac Bay
.1 (item)
18 7 5.8.2.3 : Arizona
Box
Folder
18 7 5.8.2.3.E1 : Elephant's Feet
.1 (item)
18 7 5.8.2.3.L1 : Lee's Ferry
.1 (item)
18 7 5.8.2.3.M1 : Marble Canyon
.1 (item)
18 7 5.8.2.3.P1 : Phoenix
.1 (item)
18 7 5.8.2.3.P2 : Pipe Springs
.3 (items)
18 7 5.8.2.3.S1 : Show Low
.3 (items)
18 7 5.8.2.3.S2 : Snowflake
.6 (items)
18 7 5.8.2.3.T1 : Tuba City
.1 (item)
18 8 5.8.2.4 : Arkansas
Box
Folder
18 8 5.8.2.4.C1 : Christmas Tree
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5 : California
Box
Folder
18 9 5.8.2.5.A1 : Azusa
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.E1 : Eagle Rock California
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.K1 : Keeler
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.L1 : Lover's Leap
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.M1 : Mount Diablo
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.O1 : Ono
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.R1 : Running Deer Mountain
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.S1 : Squaw Rock
.2 (items)
18 9 5.8.2.5.S2 : Suicide Rock
.1 (item)
18 9 5.8.2.5.V1 : Van Nuy
.1 (item)
18 10 5.8.2.6 : Colorado
Box
Folder
18 10 5.8.2.6.C1 : Cimmaron
.1 (item)
18 10 5.8.2.6.E1 : Elephant Rock
.1 (item)
18 10 5.8.2.6.S1 : Sleeping Ute Mountain (photos incl.)
.1 (item)
18 10 5.8.2.6.T1 : Telluride
.1 (item)
18 11 5.8.2.7 : Connecticut
Box
Folder
18 11 5.8.2.7.M1 : Moodus
.1 (item)
18 11 5.8.2.7.W1 : Wolfpit Road
.1 (item)
18 12 5.8.2.8 : Delaware
18 13 5.8.2.9 : Florida
18 14 5.8.2.10 : Georgia
Box
Folder
18 14 5.8.2.10.S1 : Savannah
.2 (items)
18 15 5.8.2.11 : Hawaii
Box
Folder
18 15 5.8.2.11.K1 : Kauai
.1 (item)
18 15 5.8.2.11.K2 : Kailua
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12 : Idaho
Box
Folder
18 16 5.8.2.12.B1 : Blackfoot
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.B2 : Bloomington
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.B3 : Bread Loaf Rock
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.B4 : Bone
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.B5 : Black Bear Corner
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.C1 : Clifton
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.C2 : Caribou
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.C3 : Cub River
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.D1 : Devil's Hand
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.D2 : Dirty Head
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.D3 : Dingle
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.G1 : Gooding Missing
0
18 16 5.8.2.12.G2 : Georgetown
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.G3 : Gentile Valley
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.G4 : Giraffe Hill
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.H1 : Horseshoe Canyon
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.I1 : Idaho Falls
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.I2 : Indian Woman Rock
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.J1 : Jack Ass Mine
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.L1 : Lost Cave
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.L2 : Lago
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.L3 : Lanes Grave
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.L4 : Little Butte Cemetery
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.M1 : Malad
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.M2 : Menan
.3 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.M3 : Mink Creek
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.M4 : Mound Valley
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.N1 : Nampa
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.O1 : Ovid
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.O2 : Oxford
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.O3 : Owyhee
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.P1 : Preston
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.P2 : Pocatello
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.P3 : Pinch Gut Lane
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.P4 : Peg Leg Slaugh
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.R1 : Rolling Thunder Mountain
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.S1 : Soda Springs
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.S2 : Suzie's Nipple
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.S3 : Strawberry Canyon
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.S4 : Squaw Leap
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.U1 : Ucon
.2 (items)
18 16 5.8.2.12.V1 : Victory Mountain
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.W1 : Willow Flat
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.0 : Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
18 16 5.8.2.12.0.1 : Dead Horse Cave, Teakettle Cave, etc
.1 (item)
18 16 5.8.2.12.0.2 : Idaho
.2 (items)
18 17 5.8.2.13: Illinois
Box
Folder
18 17 5.8.2.13.S1 : Salt Creek
.1 (item)
18 17 5.8.2.13.S2 : Starved Rock
.1 (item)
18 18 5.8.2.14: Indiana
Box
Folder
18 18 5.8.2.14.0 : Miscellaneous
.4 (items)
18 19 5.8.2.15: Iowa
18 20 5.8.2.16: Kansas
Box
Folder
18 20 5.8.2.16.U1 : Udall
.1 (item)
18 21 5.8.2.17: Kentucky
Box
Folder
18 21 5.8.2.17.0 : Miscellaneous
.1 (item)
18 22 5.8.2.18: Louisiana
Box
Folder
18 22 5.8.2.18.B1 : Baton Rouge
.1 (item)
18 23 5.8.2.19: Maine
Box
Folder
18 23 5.8.2.19.S1 : Skowhegan
.2 (items)
18 24 5.8.2.20: Maryland
Box
Folder
18 24 5.8.2.20.C1 : Cabin John
.1 (item)
18 24 5.8.2.20.S1 : Silver Spring
.1 (item)
18 25 5.8.2.21: Massachusetts
Box
Folder
18 25 5.8.2.21.0 : Miscellaneous
.1 (item)
18 26 5.8.2.22: Michigan
18 27 5.8.2.23: Minnesota
Box
Folder
18 27 5.8.2.23.A1 : Apple Valley
.1 (item)
18 27 5.8.2.23.W1 : Winona
.1 (item)
18 28 5.8.2.24: Mississippi
18 29 5.8.2.25: Missouri
Box
Folder
18 29 5.8.2.25.C1 : Creve Coeur
.1 (item)
18 29 5.8.2.25.P1 : Peculiar
.1 (item)
18 30 5.8.2.26: Montana
Box
Folder
18 30 5.8.2.26.B1 : Bearmouth
.1 (item)
18 30 5.8.2.26.C1 : Chief Mountain
.1 (item)
18 30 5.8.2.26.S1 : Song of the Singing Sirens
.1 (item)
18 31 5.8.2.27: Nebraska
Box
Folder
18 31 5.8.2.27.P1 : Plattsmouth
.1 (item)
18 32 5.8.2.28: Nevada
Box
Folder
18 32 5.8.2.28.D1 : Devil's Corral
.1 (item)
18 32 5.8.2.28.E1 : Elko
.1 (item)
18 32 5.8.2.28.T1 : Tonopah
.1 (item)
18 33 5.8.2.29: New Hampshire
18 34 5.8.2.30: New Jersey
Box
Folder
18 34 5.8.2.30.B1 : Basking Ridge
.1 (item)
18 34 5.8.2.30.B2 : Bare Hill
.1 (item)
18 34 5.8.2.30.N1 : New Providence
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31: New Mexico
Box
Folder
18 35 5.8.2.31.A1 : Array
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.B1 : Bathtub row
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.L1 : Las Cruces
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.M1 : Messilla Valley
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.M2 : Matlock Squeeze
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.S1 : Shiprock
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.T1 : Tucumcari
.1 (item)
18 35 5.8.2.31.W1 : Wichita Falls
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32: New York
Box
Folder
18 36 5.8.2.32.F1 : Freeport
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.H1 : Horse Stable Rock
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.H2 : Hoosick
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.M1 : Middletown
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.P1 : Pearl River
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.S1 : Spiten Dival [Devil]
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.S2 : Statton Island
.1 (item)
18 36 5.8.2.32.S3 : Sodus
.1 (item)
18 37 5.8.2.33: North Carolina
18 38 5.8.2.34: North Dakota
18 39 5.8.2.35: Ohio
Box
Folder
18 39 5.8.2.35.B1 : Blind Horse Turn
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36: Oklahoma
Box
Folder
18 40 5.8.2.36.A1 : Alfalfa
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36.A2 : Altus
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36.B1 : Broken Arrow
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36.B2 : Burbank
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36.G1 : Glenpool
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36.K1 : Keota
.1 (item)
18 40 5.8.2.36.N1 : Needmore
.1 (item)
18 41 5.8.2.37: Oregon
Box
Folder
18 41 5.8.2.37.G1 : Grande Rounde Valley
.1 (item)
18 41 5.8.2.37.G2 : Goat Island
.1 (item)
18 41 5.8.2.37.O1 : Oswego
.1 (item)
18 41 5.8.2.37.S1 : Sleepy Hollow
.1 (item)
18 41 5.8.2.37.T1 : Thief Valley Missing
0
18 42 5.8.2.38: Pennsylvania
Box
Folder
18 42 5.8.2.38.I1 : Intercourse
.1 (item)
18 42 5.8.2.38.P1 : Plumsock
.1 (item)
18 42 5.8.2.38.P2 : Prosperity
.1 (item)
18 43 5.8.2.39: Rhode Island
18 44 5.8.2.40: South Carolina
18 45 5.8.2.41: South Dakota
Box
Folder
18 45 5.8.2.41.D1 : Dead Cow
.1 (item)
18 46 5.8.2.42: Tennessee
18 47 5.8.2.43: Texas
Box
Folder
18 47 5.8.2.43.D1 : Deaf Smith County
.1 (item)
18 47 5.8.2.43.F1 : Friendswood
.1 (item)
18 48 5.8.2.44: Vermont
18 49 5.8.2.45: Virginia
Box
Folder
18 49 5.8.2.45.F1 : Forks of Buffalo
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46: Washington
Box
Folder
18 50 5.8.2.46.L1 : Lebam
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.L2 : Little Rock
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.M1 : Mount Rainier
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.P1 : Puyallup
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.S1 : Sumner
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.S2 : Seattle
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.W1 : Walla Walla
.1 (item)
18 50 5.8.2.46.Y1 : Yakima
.1 (item)
18 51 5.8.2.47: West Virginia
Box
Folder
18 51 5.8.2.47.B1 : Big Ugly
.1 (item)
18 51 5.8.2.47.S1 : Seneca
.1 (item)
18 52 5.8.2.48: Wisconsin
Box
Folder
18 52 5.8.2.48.S1 : Sheboygan
.3 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49: Wyoming
Box
Folder
18 53 5.8.2.49.A1 : Afton
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.A2 : Auburn
.5 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.B1 : Bedford
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.B2 : Blind Bull Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.C1 : Cokeville
.3 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.C2 : Cabin Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.C3 : Cedar Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.C4 : Coffee Pot Flat
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.C5 : Cody
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.C6 : Crowheart Butte
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.D1 : Dead Man Creek
.3 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.D2 : Devil's Gate
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.E1 : Etna
.2 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.F1 : Freedom
.7 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.F2 : Fairview
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.G1 : Grand Tetons
.2 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.I1 : Isa Lake
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.J1 : Jackson Hole
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.K1 : Kemmerer
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.O1 : Osmond
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.P1 : Prater
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.P2 : Poker Hollow
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S1 : Smoot
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S2 : Star Valley
.10 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S3 : Sweetwater
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S4 : Skull Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S5 : Squaw Creek/Squaw Flat
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S6 : Stewart
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S7 : Strawberry Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S8 : Sublette County
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.S9 : Screaming Woman Rock
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.T1 : Ten Sleep
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.T2 : Thomas Lee Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.T3 : Tincup Creek
.3 (items)
18 53 5.8.2.49.W1 : Willow Creek
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.W2 : Wailing Canyon
.1 (item)
18 53 5.8.2.49.Y1 : Yellowstone
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0: Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
18 54 5.8.2.0.A1 : Amesville
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.B1 : Bakersfield
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.B2 : Beef Canyon
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.C1 : Cut Foot Sioux
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.C2 : Christine's Run
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.D1 : Diana's Pool
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.D2 : Dover Lake
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.E1 : Eufaula
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.E2 : Eagle Pass
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.E3 : Everett's Peak
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.E4 : El Cajon
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.E5 : Estes Park
.2 (items)
18 54 5.8.2.0.F1 : Funk's Lake
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.H1 : Hell's Canyon
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.H2 : Hyenga, William (named after)
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.L1 : La mesa
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.L2 : Latitudes
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.L3 : Lost Hammer Canyon
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.L4 : Lucky Dog Silver Mine
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.M1 : Mary's Nipple
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.M2 : Monsey
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.M3 : Maria's Rock
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.N1 : Nigger Dan Hollow
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.P1 : Pomona
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.P2 : Pickett's Ridge
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.P3 : Pelican Pond
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.R1 : Rooster Rock
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.R2 : Robin
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.S1 : Sands Springs
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.S2 : Skiatook
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.S3 : Sloatsburg
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.S4 : Sawdust lane
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.S5 : Salley's Peak Hole
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.S6 : Snobakye
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.T1 : T’aa Buchiidii
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.T2 : Thief Valley
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.T3 : Terrace Canyon
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.T4 : Targhee Forest and Ski Resort
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.T5 : Tai taa
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.W1 : Workman Lake
.1 (item)
18 54 5.8.2.0.Y1 : Yahuarcocha
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3: Countries - Other than U.S.A
Box
Folder
18 55 5.8.3.A1 : Africa
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.A2: Argentina
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.C1: Canada
.2 (items)
18 55 5.8.3.E1: England
.2 (items)
18 55 5.8.3.G1: Germany
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.I1: Italy
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.J1: Japan
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.M1: Mexico
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.N1: New Zealand
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.S1: Switzerland
.1 (item)
18 55 5.8.3.T1: Tonga
.2 (items)
5.9: Other Names
Box
Folder
19 1 5.9.1: Family Names
Box
Folder
19 1 5.9.1.A1 : Applenaut
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.B1 : Barfus
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.B2 : Bilbao
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.C1 : Costello/Kastelic
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.D1 : Drabble
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.F1 : Fasselin
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.H1 : Hay
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.P1 : Price
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.P2 : Pugmire
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.P3 : Pinegar
.1 (item)
19 1 5.9.1.S1 : Sondereggar
.1 (item)
19 2 5.9.2: Street Names
Box
Folder
19 2 5.9.2.1 : Treasure Drive (Boise, Idaho)
.1 (item)
19 2 5.9.2.2 : Streets in Hyrum, Utah
.1 (item)
19 2 5.9.2.3 : Devil's Bridge (Zurich, Switzerland)
.1 (item)
19 3 5.9.3: Names of Institutions/Public Places
Box
Folder
19 3 5.9.3.1: Peteetneet School (Payson, Utah)
.1 (item)
19 3 5.9.3.2: Bluebird Restaurant (Logan, Utah)
.1 (item)
19 3 5.9.3.3: Chapel in Germany guilt by Prince as sign of remorse for killing his brother
.1 (item)
19 3 5.9.3.4: USU Anthropology Museum
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4: Nicknames
Box
Folder
19 4 5.9.4.1: Bora Bora
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.2: "School in the Swamp" (Spring Valley, New York)
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.3: "KKK" (Kankakee River, Illinois)
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.4: "River of No Return" (Salmon River)
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.5: Gringos
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.6: Bowlers
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.7: "Hotel California" is really Camarillo State Hospital
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.8: California Mule Deer
.1 (item)
19 4 5.9.4.9: Pasta Tara
.1 (item)
19 5 5.9.0: Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
19 5 5.9.0.1 : Bologna rocks named after tradition of warming pieces of bologna on them
.1 (item)
19 5 5.9.0.2 : The Lovin' Tree got name from numerous pieces of women's garments that are found hanging in tree
.1 (item)
19 5 5.9.0.3 : Porches named "widow walks" because sailors’ wives used to stand on them and wait for husbands who often never returned
.1 (item)
19 5 5.9.0.4 : Vaseline
.1 (item)
19 5 5.9.0.5 : Hush puppies
.1 (item)
19 5 5.9.0.6 : A cowardly person is "chicken"
.1 (item)
5.10: Origin of Products, Items, Objects
Box
Folder
19 6 5.10.1: Signs and Symbols
Box
Folder
19 6 5.10.1.1 : Flags
Box
Folder
19 6 5.10.1.1.1 : Swedish Flag
.1 (item)
19 6 5.10.1.1.2 : Danish Flag
.1 (item)
19 6 5.10.1.2: Watch for Falling Rock" signs were put up when an Indian named Falling Rock did not return to his tribe
.34 (items)
19 6 5.10.1.3 : Proctor and Gamble symbol
.1 (item)
19 6 5.10.1.4 : Knighthood of John Stark
.1 (item)
19 7 5.10.2: Works of Architecture
Box
Folder
19 7 5.10.2.1 : Extraordinary staircase of church in Santa Fe, New Mexico
.1 (item)
19 7 5.10.2.2 : Three legends explaining why tower of Kitziegen [Kitzingen] in German is crooked
.1 (item)
19 7 5.10.2.3 : Crosses on Lamoille Rock
.1 (item)
19 7 5.10.3: Decorations
Box
Folder
19 7 5.10.3.1: Tommy Mather table
.1 (item)
19 7 5.10.3.2: Schwibbogens Arch
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0: Miscellaneous
Box
Folder
19 8 5.10.0.1: Meat tenderizer
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.2: Origin of the Oquirrh bucket which is won by the in-state college basketball champion
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.3: Doughnuts
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.4: Filk music
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.5: Scooby-Doo
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.6: Old Bus of Creamy Hollow
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.7: Colors on a Map
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.8: Boy's and girl's shirts
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.9: Mother Goose
.6 (items)
19 8 5.10.0.10: Twin Falls reservoir
.1 (item)
19 8 5.10.0.11: Datsun automobile
.1 (item)

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Subjects

  • Folklore archives--Utah.
  • Folklore--West (U.S.)
  • Legends--United States.
  • Supernatural--Folklore.
  • Urban folklore--West (U.S.)
  • Utah State University. Folklore Program.  ( contributor)

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